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Sean Nelson

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994 | Ty Tagami
Sean Nelson had just turned 13 when he took on the role of Fresh, the street-smart, drug-running teen in the current movie of the same name. But besides living in New York City and liking "X-Men" comics, Nelson and the character he plays have little in common. Nelson lives with his parents, six siblings and a menagerie of birds, rabbits and fish in an apartment in the Bronx. Now 14, he has just started ninth grade at Manhattan's Professional Performing Arts School.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994 | Ty Tagami
Sean Nelson had just turned 13 when he took on the role of Fresh, the street-smart, drug-running teen in the current movie of the same name. But besides living in New York City and liking "X-Men" comics, Nelson and the character he plays have little in common. Nelson lives with his parents, six siblings and a menagerie of birds, rabbits and fish in an apartment in the Bronx. Now 14, he has just started ninth grade at Manhattan's Professional Performing Arts School.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1995 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Pulp Fiction" picked up four winged trophies at the 10th annual Independent Spirit Awards Saturday--for best feature, best male lead (Samuel L. Jackson), best director (Quentin Tarantino) and best screenplay (also Tarantino). Multiple citations also went to David O. Russell's "Spanking the Monkey" (best first screenplay and best first feature), and "Bullets Over Broadway," which walked off with both supporting male and female acting prizes for Chazz Palmintieri and Dianne Wiest.
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | Kevin Bronson
Riding back to the Danger zone Six years ago, Harvey Danger was playing the KROQ Weenie Roast, with the Seattle foursome's bouncy "Flagpole Sitta" reaching No. 1 that summer on the modern rock giant. This week, frontman Sean Nelson is fretting that nobody will show up Saturday night when the group plays the Troubadour. "The moment we were newsworthy seems like a long time ago," he concedes.
SPORTS
November 20, 1998 | ADAM HOLT
Narbonne High's two-point conversion pass fell short in the final minute, enabling Reseda High to escape with a 21-19 victory in a first-round City Division playoff game Thursday at Narbonne. Jonathan Smith scored on a 37-yard pass play from Sean Nelson with 47 seconds left. But Nelson's conversion pass intended for Smith fell incomplete. "We gave them a chance there at the end," Reseda Coach Joel Schaeffer said. "They were smelling blood."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Fresh" isn't. Glibly shocking, it would like you to think it deals with the hard realities of urban life, but in fact it uses its patina of social consciousness as a come-on for the most conventional kind of violent commercial filmmaking.
SPORTS
October 2, 1999
A look at selected Friday games INTERSECTIONAL SCORE: Narbonne: 10, Lynwood: 0 SYNOPSIS: Sean Nelson scored on a one-yard run in the first quarter and Bobby Rosales kicked a 29-yard field goal in the third quarter for the Gauchos (4-0). * SCORE: Manual Arts: 41, Malibu: 39 SYNOPSIS: Marco Aceituno passed for 405 yards and four touchdowns for the Toilers (3-1), who overcame a 39-13 deficit late in the third quarter at Malibu.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Despite their tough talk and rough characters, David Mamet's plays are surprisingly delicate creations. On stage and film, his con men, lowlifes and shysters need to be expertly handled or their effectiveness evaporates. Which is what has happened in director Michael Corrente's glum and unsatisfactory version of "American Buffalo."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When several years ago a friend told aspiring filmmaker Rick Famuyiwa that he was getting married, the two of them started reminiscing about growing up in the African American middle-class neighborhood of Inglewood (now becoming increasingly Latino). Famuyiwa, a 1996 USC film school graduate, came away hours later with the idea for his fresh and funny first feature,"The Wood," which he adapted from a story he wrote with one of his former USC professors, Todd Boyd.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2005 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
"Miracle's Boys," the well-done miniseries that starts at 8 tonight on the N (Noggin's nighttime network for adolescents), is everything a parent could ask for in children's TV. It's based on a thoughtful, award-winning novel for young adult readers. The great Spike Lee directed its first and last installments. The plot revolves around family values. It's wholesome enough to be marketed as a Black History Month feature. In other words, lie to your kids.
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