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Sean O Brien Strub

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NEWS
January 30, 1995 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lighting momentarily on a cushioned banquette at a West Hollywood cafe, his back to the wet blur of Sunset Boulevard, Sean O'Brien Strub, pub lisher and executive editor of POZ magazine, has placed his New York Times (one lifeline home) on the cherrywood table, then poured himself another cup of herb tea. In town on business, Strub has had a long day, one of many. This morning at the Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
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NEWS
January 30, 1995 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lighting momentarily on a cushioned banquette at a West Hollywood cafe, his back to the wet blur of Sunset Boulevard, Sean O'Brien Strub, pub lisher and executive editor of POZ magazine, has placed his New York Times (one lifeline home) on the cherrywood table, then poured himself another cup of herb tea. In town on business, Strub has had a long day, one of many. This morning at the Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2000
Stephen Gendin, 34, East Coast AIDS activist and writer who founded a national mail order pharmacy service for HIV patients. A former National Explorer Scout of the Year and one of the first openly gay activist teenagers in the country, Gendin pursued theology for a few years after graduating from Brown University in 1989. He became an activist when he was diagnosed as HIV-positive during his freshman year at Brown.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Political novice Sharon Pratt Dixon scored an upset victory Tuesday in the Democratic primary to nominate a successor to Mayor Marion Barry, and Jesse Jackson gained the party's backing to become a "shadow senator" for the nation's capital. "It looks wonderful," Dixon told supporters. With all 140 precincts reporting, Dixon defeated John Ray, the front-runner through much of the campaign, and mayoral hopefuls Charlene Drew Jarvis, David A. Clarke and Walter E. Fauntroy. Former D.C.
BOOKS
February 8, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Maybe Sid Fleischman should take more showers. "There's a call from Chicago," his wife, Betty, told him while he was sudsing away the week before last. "I don't know anybody in Chicago," he called back. After he had dried off, the Santa Monica writer called back and learned the telephonic missive had not been a plea to speak at some conference or convention. ("Children's writers are called on a great deal for speeches," Fleischman explained.) Instead, it was the American Library Assn.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD
Every year around this time, journalism professor Samir A. Husni steps forward to announce how many new magazines vied for space on the crowded newsstands during the previous year. In 1993, the University of Mississippi mag maven says, there were 789 new books--the largest number he's seen in nine years of monitoring the industry.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | DANIEL Q. HANEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The first time Dr. Joel Gallant laid eyes on Michael Willis, he was struck by how truly awful his new patient looked. "A skinny little emaciated creature" is what the doctor remembers. Willis was in the full grip of AIDS, covered with eczema, partially paralyzed by a herpes infection of the spine, 140 pounds and falling. Death within a year seemed almost certain. That was 2 1/2 years ago. Now Willis, at 37, exudes energy.
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