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Sean O Keefe

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NEWS
July 8, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday named Sean O'Keefe, the Pentagon's top financial officer and a confidant of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, to be acting secretary of the Navy, placing him at the helm as the service struggles to recover from the Tailhook sex-harassment scandal.
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NATIONAL
August 11, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Ted Stevens, the gruff and bullishly determined longtime former U.S. senator from Alaska, died in Monday's crash of a small plane near a small fishing town on Alaska's Bristol Bay, a family spokesman confirmed Tuesday. "The family has just been notified that he did not survive," said Mitch Rose, former chief of staff for Stevens, 86, who served 41 years in the Senate before being convicted on corruption charges and losing his seat in 2008. The charges were later dismissed because of prosecutorial misconduct.
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NEWS
November 15, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday nominated Sean O'Keefe, an outspoken critic of NASA's budget-busting, to take the helm of the space agency as it struggles to fulfill its mission and meet demands for stricter accounting and tougher management. The appointment of O'Keefe, 45, an experienced government belt-tightener who is deputy director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, will likely mean more cost-cutting and upheaval at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
SCIENCE
December 14, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Sean O'Keefe, whose three roller-coaster years as NASA administrator saw the tragedy of the Columbia space shuttle disaster and the glory of the Mars rover and Cassini expeditions, resigned from the agency Monday. O'Keefe, a self-professed "bean counter" brought in by President Bush to bring NASA's spiraling budget under control, represented a sharp departure from previous administrators: He had no background in astronautics.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
Following a scathing report on the lapses that led to the loss of the space shuttle Columbia, Republican and Democratic senators on Wednesday pressed the NASA administrator to find those responsible for the disaster and hold them accountable. But Sean O'Keefe, NASA chief, refused to assign blame during his congressional testimony or in a subsequent meeting with reporters.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | Reuters
Sean O'Keefe was sworn in as Navy secretary on Wednesday, shortly after President Bush named him to the post he has held on an acting basis since July.
NATIONAL
December 13, 2004 | From Associated Press
NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe will resign this week, a government official said Sunday, and a spokesman for Louisiana State University said O'Keefe was a leading candidate to become the school's chancellor. The LSU committee looking for a candidate to fill the $500,000-a-year job running the Baton Rouge campus will meet Thursday, and O'Keefe will make his case for the job, said Joel Tohline, head of the search team.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | Reuters
President Bush will nominate Acting Navy Secretary Sean O'Keefe to become Navy secretary, replacing H. Lawrence Garrett, who resigned over the Tailhook sex harassment scandal, the White House announced Friday. Bush will send O'Keefe's nomination to the Senate for approval. O'Keefe, 36, was named acting secretary in July after Garrett resigned.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | Associated Press
Sean O'Keefe, the Pentagon's comptroller and close associate of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, is expected to be nominated as the next secretary of the Navy as the service seeks to recover from a sexual-abuse scandal, Pentagon and congressional sources said Monday. The sources said the selection of O'Keefe, 36, to head the Navy would be announced today. The nomination must be approved by the full Senate. O'Keefe would succeed H.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy Secretary Sean O'Keefe said Wednesday that the Navy should permit women to fly combat aircraft missions and to serve aboard all Navy ships, including submarines and amphibious vessels. While O'Keefe's comment during his final days in office are not binding, they do signal a changing attitude among top Navy officials, indicating that efforts to expand the role of Navy women probably will not meet with the same opposition that they have in the past.
NATIONAL
December 13, 2004 | From Associated Press
NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe will resign this week, a government official said Sunday, and a spokesman for Louisiana State University said O'Keefe was a leading candidate to become the school's chancellor. The LSU committee looking for a candidate to fill the $500,000-a-year job running the Baton Rouge campus will meet Thursday, and O'Keefe will make his case for the job, said Joel Tohline, head of the search team.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
Following a scathing report on the lapses that led to the loss of the space shuttle Columbia, Republican and Democratic senators on Wednesday pressed the NASA administrator to find those responsible for the disaster and hold them accountable. But Sean O'Keefe, NASA chief, refused to assign blame during his congressional testimony or in a subsequent meeting with reporters.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2003 | Peter Pae and Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writers
NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, responding to a scathing report that blamed the Columbia accident on a broken safety culture, vowed Wednesday to make sweeping changes that would "reinvigorate" the beleaguered space agency. But the immediate task of getting the shuttle to fly again -- perhaps as early as next spring -- could cost "hundreds of millions of dollars," and complying with all the recommendations could cost immeasurably more, O'Keefe said in an interview.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
In December 2001, a senator asked the man in line to become the next chief of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to give his vision for an agency formed to reach for the moon, planets and stars. Sean O'Keefe replied in his confirmation hearing that he wanted to bring an "entrepreneurial spirit" and "prudent management principles" to NASA.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newly appointed chief of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has inherited a financial quagmire at the space agency, which is facing massive cost overruns that may even prevent it from sending a full crew to the space station to carry out scientific research.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday nominated Sean O'Keefe, an outspoken critic of NASA's budget-busting, to take the helm of the space agency as it struggles to fulfill its mission and meet demands for stricter accounting and tougher management. The appointment of O'Keefe, 45, an experienced government belt-tightener who is deputy director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, will likely mean more cost-cutting and upheaval at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
NEWS
February 1, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
LOTSA QUID, LITTLE QUO: Several labor unions chipped in up to $100,000 when aides to President Clinton hit them up for loans to finance various inaugural events. Now union leaders are squawking about the small number of top posts they've landed in the new Administration. "On paper, it's not a hell of a lot," said one lobbyist. . . . So far, unions have only two of their own in key jobs.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The Navy's acting secretary said Wednesday that a "handful of junior officers" had sexually abused women at the Tailhook convention and that too many people "have been tarred with a brush they really don't deserve." Sean O'Keefe, in his first extensive comments on the scandal, said the service's morale "has been battered" as a result of the incidents at the 1991 aviators' convention in Las Vegas. "The issue that disturbs me is . . .
NEWS
February 1, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
LOTSA QUID, LITTLE QUO: Several labor unions chipped in up to $100,000 when aides to President Clinton hit them up for loans to finance various inaugural events. Now union leaders are squawking about the small number of top posts they've landed in the new Administration. "On paper, it's not a hell of a lot," said one lobbyist. . . . So far, unions have only two of their own in key jobs.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy Secretary Sean O'Keefe said Wednesday that the Navy should permit women to fly combat aircraft missions and to serve aboard all Navy ships, including submarines and amphibious vessels. While O'Keefe's comment during his final days in office are not binding, they do signal a changing attitude among top Navy officials, indicating that efforts to expand the role of Navy women probably will not meet with the same opposition that they have in the past.
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