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Sean O Toole

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BUSINESS
June 8, 2008 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
When Sean O'Toole decided to make his fortune in foreclosures, he figured he would have five "partners": death, disease, divorce, drugs and denial. The "five Ds of foreclosure," as O'Toole calls them, refers to the life crises that had typically triggered the lender's repossession of a home. If a household's main breadwinner dies, for example, the surviving spouse may not be able to keep up the mortgage payments and thus may be forced to give up the house.
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BUSINESS
December 19, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Sean O'Toole, 43, founded website ForeclosureRadar in 2006, just as the real estate bubble was getting ready to pop. His company tracks foreclosure auctions in California, Nevada, Arizona, Oregon and Washington. An early technophile: "My parents bought my first computer for me when I was 10. It was the first Apple II, and that really defines my life thereafter. By the age of 12, I could program in three programming languages, and I dropped out of college at 18 to form my first software company.
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BUSINESS
December 19, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Sean O'Toole, 43, founded website ForeclosureRadar in 2006, just as the real estate bubble was getting ready to pop. His company tracks foreclosure auctions in California, Nevada, Arizona, Oregon and Washington. An early technophile: "My parents bought my first computer for me when I was 10. It was the first Apple II, and that really defines my life thereafter. By the age of 12, I could program in three programming languages, and I dropped out of college at 18 to form my first software company.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2008 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
When Sean O'Toole decided to make his fortune in foreclosures, he figured he would have five "partners": death, disease, divorce, drugs and denial. The "five Ds of foreclosure," as O'Toole calls them, refers to the life crises that had typically triggered the lender's repossession of a home. If a household's main breadwinner dies, for example, the surviving spouse may not be able to keep up the mortgage payments and thus may be forced to give up the house.
SPORTS
October 23, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
If there's any doubts about the Huntington Beach baseball team's abilities for this spring, just go talk to college recruiters. The Oilers are expected to have at least seven players on their roster signed or committed to colleges. The latest commitment is senior shortstop Jessie Kuet to Stanford. Junior pitcher Noah Davis has committed to UC Santa Barbara. Sophomore infielder Logan Pouelsen and freshman catcher Hagen Danner are committed to UCLA. Senior first baseman Jake Brodt is committed to Santa Clara.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
Southern California's housing market ended the year with sharp gains, rounding out the first solid year of sustained improvement after nearly five years of real estate malaise - and helping set up further improvement in 2013. The region's median home price registered a sizable 19.6% pop in December compared with the same month last year to hit $323,000, real estate firm DataQuick reported Tuesday. A record level of cash buyers flooded into the market and more move-up homes sold last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1994
A 25-year-old Kansas woman was killed when she was thrown from her car early Saturday morning after a collision with another vehicle at an intersection, police said. Shanna Seasel was southbound on North Main Street when she slammed into a car headed east on West Taft Avenue about 2:30 a.m., Orange Detective Sean O'Toole said. Seasel was ejected from her 1993 Geo when the car overturned, he said. Seasel was taken to UCI Medical Center but died of her injuries on the way, O'Toole said.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo
Foreclosure activity in California took a steep dive in December, a report shows, but the decline had more to do with holiday forbearance than economic improvement. Notices of default dropped 17.5% compared with November, according to the report by ForeclosureRadar.com. The number of homes seized by lenders dropped 12%, and the number of homes sold to third parties declined 28.9%. The drop in foreclosures appears to reflect an easing in activity by banks and other lenders hoping to avoid delivering disheartening news to troubled buyers and shutting people out of their homes during the holiday season, the website said.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2008 | Peter Viles
Banks and lenders have now foreclosed on $100 billion worth of California homes over the last two years and are foreclosing at the rate of 1,300 houses every business day, according to a new report from ForeclosureRadar.com. The report, which covers foreclosure activity in California in July, says that new mortgage defaults are declining but foreclosures are continuing to rise sharply. "It is clear that far fewer homeowners are finding a way out of foreclosure," the company reports.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo
Foreclosure activity in the first quarter in the U.S. fell to its lowest level in more than four years despite predictions that a new wave of distressed homes would flood the market this year. Foreclosure filings in the first quarter were down 2% from the fourth quarter of 2011 and 16% from the same period last year. An estimated 572,928 properties received foreclosure filings during the quarter, the lowest total since the fourth quarter of 2007 , according to Irvine data firm RealtyTrac.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2008 | Peter Viles, Times Staff Writer
A new state law requiring lenders to contact homeowners before foreclosure filings led to a dramatic drop in foreclosure activity in California in September, according to the website ForeclosureRadar.com. The effect of the state law is so dramatic, the website says, that it will make monthly foreclosure statistics worthless as barometers of housing market conditions. ForeclosureRadar reports that the number of notices of default filed in September dropped 61.8% from August levels, and the number of notices of trustee sale filings -- which mark the end of the foreclosure process -- dropped 47.3% in a month.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2008 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
I did not set out to buy a foreclosed house. Earlier this year, I wrote about selling my condominium unit in 2005 to rent, rejecting the hyped promise of an always-rising real estate market. Now I've purchased a foreclosed home -- but that doesn't mean I've bought into the new wave of hype in real estate, the idea that cheap, repossessed houses are a sure bet. There's usually good reason many foreclosed houses languish with no buyers.
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