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Sean Patrick Thomas

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2001 | RITA KEMPLEY, WASHINGTON POST
Sean Patrick Thomas won't do the Hollywood shuffle. You won't catch this rising star driving Miss Daisy or schlepping Matt Damon's golf bag. "The roles I feel more comfortable with were written for white guys. Writers attribute characteristics to African American men that really don't have anything to do with being black," says Thomas, who encountered special challenges in his first major movie role as the hip-hopping hero of the new teen romance "Save the Last Dance."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2001 | RITA KEMPLEY, WASHINGTON POST
Sean Patrick Thomas won't do the Hollywood shuffle. You won't catch this rising star driving Miss Daisy or schlepping Matt Damon's golf bag. "The roles I feel more comfortable with were written for white guys. Writers attribute characteristics to African American men that really don't have anything to do with being black," says Thomas, who encountered special challenges in his first major movie role as the hip-hopping hero of the new teen romance "Save the Last Dance."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2002 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood, controversy rarely hurts the bottom line, so it came as no surprise when MGM over the weekend disclosed plans for a sequel to "Barbershop," the breakout comedy about life in a Chicago barbershop, which has earned more than $65 million at the box office. The studio is already in talks to bring back star Ice Cube, although the script does not yet exist. "We're still flushing it out.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Barbershop" is as warm as it is wise, deftly setting off uproarious humor with an underlying seriousness that sneaks up on the viewer, providing an experience that is richer than anticipated. A lively and endearing cast is headed by Ice Cube, in an impressively understated performance as Calvin, the hard-pressed proprietor of a Chicago barbershop. From his late father, Calvin inherited the barbershop that his grandfather opened in 1958.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When we meet Julia Stiles' Sara in the skillfully made heart-tugger "Save the Last Dance," she's a small-town, 17-year-old ballet student anxiously awaiting her Juilliard audition. Her mother, a busy florist, in rushing to be with her daughter at this all-important occasion, is killed in a car crash. By the time the opening credits are over, Sara is on her way to Chicago to live with her father, Roy (Terry Kinney), a jazz trumpeter she barely knows.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Barbershop 2: Back in Business" is that rare sequel -- one worthy of its original. "Barbershop," set in a vintage Chicago South Side tonsorial parlor, was a hilarious and ingratiating hit last year, its box office no doubt helped by a flap over Cedric the Entertainer, as the shop's senior barber, making some outrageously politically incorrect remarks about such African American icons as Rosa Parks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2002 | KEVIN CRUST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not easy being a middle-aged serial killer in the movies. The bones begin to creak, the muscles ache, and someone's always trying to reinvent your genre. The "Friday the 13th" folks blasted poor Jason, hockey mask and all, into outer space for "Jason X," and now, in "Halloween: Resurrection," Michael Myers is turned loose in cyberspace.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The inspirational football drama "Remember the Titans" and the urban hospital TV drama "City of Angels," canceled by CBS late last year because of poor ratings, were key winners Saturday at the 32nd annual NAACP Image Awards. A non-show-business figure, however, stole the spotlight at the glitzy Hollywood event honoring the best in black entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2003 | Janice Rhoshalle Littlejohn, Special to The Times
Four hundred extras in police dress blues lined the street in front of Second Baptist Church in Los Angeles a couple of weeks ago, saluting Ella Farmer's rose-laced casket carried by actors Sean Patrick Thomas and Jonathan LaPaglia. Elizabeth Marvel, Roger Aaron Brown and Craig T. Nelson looked on with tears. It was a stirring made-for-television spectacle shot for tonight's closing scene of "The District." But the tears were real.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
What's New Bread and Roses (2001). England's Ken Loach brings his usual deft mix of the personal and the political to Los Angeles for his American debut film, which depicts a much-abused and deprived cleaning crew at a downtown high-rise gradually aroused to protest by an irrepressible labor organizer (Adrien Brody) and one of the workers, a naive and idealistic newcomer from Mexico (Pilar Padilla). Studio Home Entertainment: no list price; DVD: $24.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The question: Can producer Neal H. Moritz take a couple of his stars from his teen horror hit "I Know What You Did Last Summer" and successfully transport them to yet another screen version of "Les Liaisons Dangereuses"? The answer: an unequivocal "yes." In his feature film debut, writer-director Roger Kumble honors the spirit of the 1782 Choderlos de Laclos novel with admirable fidelity.
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