Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSearch And Seizure
IN THE NEWS

Search And Seizure

NEWS
June 15, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that police may set up roadblocks on highways and routinely stop motorists to see if they are sober. In balancing a state's interest in catching drunk drivers against a motorist's right to privacy, the high court said that public safety clearly should prevail. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said that a 30-second stop at a police checkpoint is a small price to pay for combatting the carnage caused by drunk drivers.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | KENNETH J. FANUCCHI, Times Staff Writer
The district attorney's office said this week it will file criminal charges within a month against leaders of a Santa Monica church-run day-care center. The announcement follows the court-ordered release Monday of documents seized during a Jan. 14 inspection of the Santa Monica Foursquare Church's Weekday Sunday School. Deputy Dist. Atty. Lee Harris said charges will include violations of state health, safety and licensing laws governing child day-care centers.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
When postal workers in Santa Ana began re-wrapping the soggy, first-class parcel with the Hawaiian postmark, they found more than rotting fruit inside. Hitchhiking in the 20 decaying soursops (which taste like a mix of mangoes and pineapples) were five live Mediterranean fruit fly larvae--infant versions of the crop-killing pest that in the early 1980s cost California $200 million in crop losses and eradication expenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2004 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Stepping into a long-running Simi Valley dispute, the U.S. Supreme Court today will examine the extent to which police can detain and question individuals while serving search warrants. The case stems from a 1998 search by Simi Valley police for weapons at a suspected gang safe house after a drive-by shooting. With guns drawn, nearly two dozen officers swarmed the Patricia Avenue home at dawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Thursday reversed the dismissal of a civil rights case filed by a former Los Angeles police officer who claimed fellow officers illegally searched her home looking for evidence that she had had improper sexual relations with a teen-age boy. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ordered that Kathleen Oborn, 34, be granted a new trial, overruling a 1989 decision by U.S. District Judge Jesse W. Curtis, who has since retired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Times reporter was cited for contempt and jailed for several hours Wednesday after she refused to answer a question in Long Beach Municipal Court concerning an arrest she witnessed while preparing a story on a police task force. Roxana Kopetman, a reporter in The Times' Long Beach bureau, spent about six hours in a courthouse lockup before she was released on a writ of habeas corpus.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-five years ago this week, the Supreme Court in an opinion by then Chief Justice Earl Warren ruled that police may stop and frisk a crime suspect on the streets to check for weapons. However, the officer may not go beyond this "protective search" to also look for evidence of a crime unless he obtains a search warrant from a magistrate. According to Warren, this dual approach protected the safety of the police while protecting citizens against body searches by overzealous officers.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Are the passengers in a car that has been stopped by the police "seized" by the authorities, or are they free to walk away? The Supreme Court took up that question Monday in a California case that could decide whether passengers are protected from "unreasonable searches and seizures" when officers pull over the vehicle in which they are riding.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California Court of Appeal on Thursday upheld the power of state liquor-control agents to conduct warrantless searches of bars when they suspect illegal drug activity. The three-member panel unanimously rejected a claim that such searches were unconstitutional, ruling that investigators have broad latitude to inspect closely regulated commercial businesses, where there is less expectation of privacy than in a home.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a dramatic response to concerns about crime, an Administration task force will propose to President Clinton more aggressive frisking of people suspected of carrying weapons in and around public housing projects, officials said Tuesday. The call for police to stop and frisk more people in streets and other common areas is a central element of an Administration plan to increase security in public housing projects.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|