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Search And Seizure

NATIONAL
May 22, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Mistakes sometimes happen when police conduct home searches, the Supreme Court said Monday in throwing out a lawsuit brought by a white couple in Southern California who were rousted from bed and held naked at gunpoint by deputies looking for several black suspects. The search of Max Rettele and his girlfriend, Judy Sadler, in their bedroom may have been an error, and it was certainly embarrassing to them, the justices said.
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WORLD
May 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Colombian navy said a buried cache of cocaine found along the Pacific Coast was much smaller than initially believed and not the largest drug haul in the nation's history, as officials first claimed. It said the amount totaled 14.5 tons, attributing the discrepancy to miscalculations from an initial sight count. The revised figure still makes the seizure the largest by Colombian authorities this year. In May 2005 officials found 16.5 tons of cocaine in an underground chamber.
WORLD
May 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombia's navy made the largest drug seizure in the nation's history when it uncovered more than 24 tons of cocaine buried along the Pacific coast, the defense minister said. The cocaine, with a wholesale value of more than $500 million, was found Sunday near Pizarro, 250 miles west of Bogota. No arrests had been made.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Are the passengers in a car that has been stopped by the police "seized" by the authorities, or are they free to walk away? The Supreme Court took up that question Monday in a California case that could decide whether passengers are protected from "unreasonable searches and seizures" when officers pull over the vehicle in which they are riding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2007 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
A former Los Angeles deputy police chief who admitted to a sexual relationship with a subordinate while he oversaw internal affairs has been sued by the police union. The suit alleges that Michael Berkow ordered an improper search of the work spaces of homicide detectives, including those investigating the killing of rapper Biggie Smalls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2007 | Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
In a move that could deal a serious blow to Italy's prosecution of its former prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, a federal judge in Los Angeles has ruled that authorities cannot use evidence recently seized from the home and office of a longtime Hollywood producer and co-defendant. The extraordinary action by U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson was requested by attorneys for producer Frank Agrama and agreed to by the U.S.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The American Civil Liberties Union asked a federal court Friday to unseal secret documents filed by the Bush administration in support of its warrantless domestic surveillance program. The administration announced last week that it was suspending the electronic surveillance program and says the ACLU case challenging its constitutionality should therefore be dismissed. It has filed some of its arguments under seal, preventing the ACLU from seeing them.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2007 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
A Texas teenager has a bullet in the middle of his forehead -- and some prosecutors would love to have a look at it. But the lawyer for the teen -- who could face life in prison if convicted of attempted capital murder for his alleged role in a burglary and shootout last year -- is refusing to allow surgeons to remove the potential evidence in the case, which is lodged 2 inches above his client's eyes.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A signing statement attached to postal legislation by President Bush last month may have opened the way for the government to open mail without a warrant. The White House denies any change in policy. The law requires government agents to get warrants to open first-class letters.
WORLD
December 16, 2006 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Mexican President Felipe Calderon didn't wait long to challenge the violent drug traffickers that control parts of Michoacan, his home state. But Operation Michoacan United, announced Monday, so far looks like a bust -- and not the kind Calderon had in mind. A week after taking the oath of office, Calderon ordered more than 6,000 soldiers, sailors and federal police to swarm towns where warring drug smugglers are believed responsible for as many as 500 killings this year.
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