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Search And Seizure

WORLD
August 16, 2006 | Zakeus Chibaya and Robyn Dixon, Special to The Times
Highways are clogged by roadblocks as police conduct lengthy searches for currency before a revaluation of the Zimbabwean dollar aimed at reining in the country's hyperinflation. Mourners say they have been forced to open coffins, and some women say they have had to submit to body cavity searches. The Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe lopped three zeroes off the currency more than two weeks ago and gave people until Monday to exchange their old notes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police searching for clues about a missing woman have investigated the files of a church computer used by her ex-husband. Debbie Hawk, 46, was discovered missing from her ransacked home in June, police said. Her former spouse, Dave Hawk, volunteered at the Lemoore Presbyterian Church and used its computers, the Rev. Sandy Brown said. Hanford police made copies of three hard drives and took a printed copy of the church directory last week, Brown said. No suspects have been named.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2006 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
The San Gabriel Valley Transit Authority -- the tiny bus firm with its own police force that became part of the criminal probe into the crash of a rare Ferrari in Malibu -- appears to have made its last stop. But not before a final strange ride.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Latino and African American motorists in most areas of Los Angeles are significantly more likely than whites to be asked during police stops to leave their vehicles and submit to searches, according to the latest study ordered by the city. However, the study group said its detailed analysis of the data cannot determine whether the different treatment is a sign of racial profiling by officers.
NATIONAL
July 11, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge held Monday that an FBI search of the Capitol Hill office of Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.) was lawfully conducted, ruling that members of Congress who are under criminal investigation generally deserve no more protection under the law than ordinary citizens. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan was a blow both to Jefferson, the focus of a federal bribery probe, and to the House leadership, a bipartisan group that had supported his protest of the search.
WORLD
July 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A car bomb targeting Iranian pilgrims struck this morning near a Shiite shrine in the holy city of Kufa, killing at least 12 people and wounding 37, police said. The bomb exploded near the shrine of Maitham al-Tamar and yards from the Kufa mosque. Attacks on houses of worship have stoked tensions between Shiite and Sunni Muslims. Elsewhere, hundreds of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2006 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
Police officers can stop and search a parolee even if he has done little or nothing to arouse suspicion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 6-3 decision upholds a California law that allows the spot search of known parolees by law enforcement officers without reasonable suspicion of a crime -- the standard required in most other states.
NATIONAL
June 16, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
A divided Supreme Court ruled Thursday that police armed with a search warrant may rush into a house without giving a required warning to the occupants and may use the evidence they find there. In a 5-4 decision, the court said it would be rash to bar evidence in a criminal trial simply because police did not wait long enough before entering, a technical violation of the "knock and announce" rule.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
A congressional advisory panel has asked a federal judge to return to Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.) the files that the FBI seized from his office in a nighttime raid on Capitol Hill. The Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group, in a 43-page motion, said that the FBI's search of Jefferson's office and its seizure of files and computer disks was not only illegal and unconstitutional, but a "grave threat to the separation of powers principle that is the very foundation of our governmental structure."
NATIONAL
May 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
In a break with his counterparts in the House, the Senate's leader said Sunday that the FBI was within its rights to search the office of a congressman under investigation in a bribery case. "No House member, no senator, nobody in government should be above the law of the land, period," Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist said. The Tennessee Republican was responding to the search conducted May 20 in the office of Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.).
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