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BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
If you turn to Google before turning to a doctor when you're feeling icky, you're not alone. Last year, 1 in 3 Americans typed their symptoms into search engines and medical websites before seeing their physician, according to a Pew Research Center study released this week. And with the flu epidemic making its way steadily west, now seems like a good time to talk about the best way to search for health information online. Searching for medical advice online can never replace a visit to a living, breathing doctor, but there are ways to help you weed through the online clutter and get reliable information.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grass-roots effort to harness the power of the masses has recently emerged to solve one of the most intractable problems of the Internet--indexing the vastness of the Web. The Open Directory project has mushroomed in the last year, suddenly becoming a credible competitor to the dominance of search leader Yahoo.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2006 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. on Monday unveiled a radically new approach to online searches, offering a free service that lets a website operator create a tailored search engine to scour an index of handpicked sites. Anyone who has used Web search engines knows the frustration of trying to find the desired information embedded in pages of results. Google's Custom Search Engine adds human intelligence to the company's hyper-efficient automated process, presumably increasing the relevance to the user.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2004 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. is expected to release a new Internet search website today that borrows heavily from the two big rivals it's designed to compete against. The new MSN site will employ Yahoo Inc.'s search technology and echo the simple design pioneered by Google Inc. Search engines such as Google have become a launching pad for consumers on the Internet, and advertisers eager to reach those consumers have made the sites big moneymakers.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Internet powerhouse Yahoo Inc. is setting out to build a vast online library of copyrighted books that pleases publishers -- something that rival Google Inc. hasn't been able to achieve. The Open Content Alliance, a project that Yahoo is backing with several other partners, plans to provide digital versions of books, academic papers, video and audio.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011 | By Richard Verrier and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Film director Penelope Spheeris' new comedy, "Balls to the Wall," had barely premiered in Europe when bootleg copies started popping up on the Internet, throwing its U.S. release into jeopardy. A Spheeris assistant sent out as many as 30 cease-and-desist notices a day in a desperate, but failed, attempt to halt the piracy. "It's like putting out a forest fire with your bare feet," she said. That helps explain why Spheeris and other filmmakers are backing tough new legislation making its way through Congress that would give the Justice Department broad powers to shut down websites that host pirated material and would open the door for movie studios, music companies and other copyright holders to seek court injunctions against Internet companies they believe are aiding in copyright theft, which amounts to $58 billion a year.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2004 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
The thing that made Google Inc. famous isn't what's making it rich. Google became a household name by delivering Internet search results, and many observers thought it was making a lot of money by licensing that technology to others. But as it revealed this week in registration papers for its hotly anticipated initial public stock offering, 95% of Google's nearly $1 billion in sales last year came from advertising. In many ways, Google is becoming the advertising agency for the Internet.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2007 | Alex Pham and Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writers
Google Inc.'s memory is getting a little shorter. Just not short enough for some. The company adjusted its policies Wednesday to answer complaints that it never forgets what users have looked for. Google said it would continue to collect and maintain a vast internal database of search-engine queries -- as diverse as "digital camera" and "bomb making instructions" -- tied to the unique addresses of the computers on which they were entered.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2007 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
Sam Zell, who agreed to a takeover this week of Tribune Co., came to the heart of Silicon Valley on Thursday evening and said there needed to be "a new deal and new formulas" between newspapers and Internet companies. Journalists produce the news that search engines such as Yahoo Inc. and Google Inc. seamlessly and freely make available to anyone with a computer, Zell said during a presentation on corporate governance at Stanford University.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Kim Kardashian. Hurricane Sandy. Jeremy Lin. Big Bird. These timely phrases are not the most searched for terms of 2012.  After analyzing the top 1,000 search terms across 60 search engines, Experian Marketing Services found that the most searched for term of 2012 was ... Facebook. And not because of the IPO. Facebook was also the most searched for phrase of 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008. Why were people searching for Facebook? Presumably because they were too lazy to go to their browser's URL bar and type in facebook.com.
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