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Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence Project

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NEWS
July 13, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not easy listening to the universe. For one thing, there's the problem of office space. Consider Kent Cullers, for instance. A big, paper-stuffed box labeled "Ice-Packed Sweet Corn" offers cardboard evidence of his latest office move at NASA's Ames Research Center here. Still stored away, too, is a special "camera" that allows Cullers to read on the tip of a finger--one letter at a time--projections of documents, equations and other data unavailable in Braille or via his talking computer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alive today is the first generation of scientists to interrogate the darkness. Conceivably it might also be the last generation before contact is made--and this the last moment before we discover that someone in the darkness is calling out to us. --Carl Sagan [from "Pale Blue Dot," p. 352] * Every day, every few seconds, some of the world's most powerful radio telescopes scan millions of channels in outer space in an effort to detect signs of extraterrestrial communication.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alive today is the first generation of scientists to interrogate the darkness. Conceivably it might also be the last generation before contact is made--and this the last moment before we discover that someone in the darkness is calling out to us. --Carl Sagan [from "Pale Blue Dot," p. 352] * Every day, every few seconds, some of the world's most powerful radio telescopes scan millions of channels in outer space in an effort to detect signs of extraterrestrial communication.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not easy listening to the universe. For one thing, there's the problem of office space. Consider Kent Cullers, for instance. A big, paper-stuffed box labeled "Ice-Packed Sweet Corn" offers cardboard evidence of his latest office move at NASA's Ames Research Center here. Still stored away, too, is a special "camera" that allows Cullers to read on the tip of a finger--one letter at a time--projections of documents, equations and other data unavailable in Braille or via his talking computer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Microsoft Corp. co-founder Paul G. Allen is giving $13.5 million for research that includes looking for intelligent life in outer space, bringing his total donations to the radio astronomy project to $25 million. Allen, the world's fifth-richest person, announced his latest gift in a groundbreaking ceremony Thursday for the Allen Telescope Array in Palo Alto.
REAL ESTATE
February 21, 1988
Albert A. Dorman, president and chairman of Ashland Technology Corp., Los Angeles, has been named Engineer of the Year by the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering. He will receive the institute's George Washington Award at Friday's Honors and Awards Banquet at the Almansor Court restaurant in Alhambra. Dorman also serves as chairman of three of Ashland Technology's seven subsidiary firms, including Daniel, Mann, Johnson, & Mendenhall, Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1997 | BRETT ANTHONY COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A memorial service will be held today for Babak Sadr, a UCLA instructor, author and innovative electrical engineer. Sadr died Jan. 23 of lymphatic cancer at Westlake Village Selic House Cancer Institute. He was 33. Raised in Tehran, Iran, Sadr was a whiz kid whose family arrived in the United States in 1977. They settled in Agoura Hills two years later. At age 19, Sadr worked at the NASA research center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence project.
BOOKS
November 22, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
IS ANYONE OUT THERE?: The Scientific Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence by Frank Drake with Dava Sobel (Delacorte Press: $22; 288 pp.). "Forty years as an astronomer," Frank Drake begins in these pages, "have not quelled my enthusiasm for lying outside after dark, staring at the stars." We have come to expect such youthful wonder from astronomers ever since Carl Sagan marveled at "billions and billions of stars," and in this wise, candid and clearly written book, Drake delivers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Half a century ago, British novelist, scientist and civil servant C.P. Snow expressed his concern over the separateness of the "two cultures": the humanities on the one hand and the sciences on the other. Trained in both areas, he was alarmed by the extent to which people proficient in the one often lacked any real knowledge of the other.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in a month, the night sky over Monterey Park was relatively clear. In the darkness of the city's Garvey Ranch Observatory, Gary Fine bent to look into a telescope eyepiece. The view skyward extended far beyond the eucalyptus trees of Garvey Ranch Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1999
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized tests. Here are home-viewing tips: * Today--"Delta Jews" (KCET 10-11 p.m.) With remarkable candor, this documentary about immigrant Jews who settled in the Mississippi Delta in the last century explores the challenges of assimilation and anti-Semitism, plus the relationship between African -Americans and Jews. Alfred Uhry narrates.
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