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Searle

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NEWS
July 18, 1985 | Associated Press
G. D. Searle & Co., a pharmaceutical company, and Monsanto Co., a chemical company, announced today that they have agreed to merge in a deal valued at $2.7 billion.
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NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke
A shallow magnitude 3.8 earthquake was reported Tuesday afternoon 14 miles from Searles Valley, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 2:49 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 3.7 miles. According to the USGS, the epicenter was 31 miles from Ridgecrest, and 74 miles from Barstow. In the past 10 days, there have been no earthquakes magnitude 3.0 and greater centered nearby.
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BUSINESS
October 10, 1985
In its suit, Genex Corp., which supplies a raw material to G. D. Searl for making the sweetener Aspartame, alleges that Searle fraudulently induced Genex to gear up its L-phenylalanine production plants and that Searle failed to disclose plans to build its own L-phenylalanine plant in Augusta, Ga. In 1984, 58% of Genex's $34.8 million in revenue was from sales to Searle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2012
Joe Clarke Youth basketball icon in Los Angeles Joe Clarke, 75 , a youth basketball icon in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years who founded the Watts Magicians travel team and helped dozens of boys and girls try to reach their basketball dreams on and off the court, died Thursday at Lakewood Regional Medical Center after an illness, according to family friend Ronald Scipio. Born in Panama on Jan. 11, 1936, Clarke teamed with Willie Naulls to create the South-Central L.A. Athletic Club, which evolved into the Watts Magicians travel team.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
G. D. Searle & Co. has agreed to settle all claims and lawsuits over alleged injury from the use of its Copper-7 contraceptive device that were brought by a law firm representing more than 100 such clients, a company spokeswoman said Thursday. Searle spokeswoman Kay Bruno said the agreement, which still requires approval from clients represented by the Minneapolis law firm of Robins, Kaplan, Miller and Ciresi of Minneapolis, bars disclosure of the settlement's terms and conditions, including the number of claims settled.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1989 | From Times wire services
A federal jury today rejected a woman's claims that she was injured by an intrauterine copper contraceptive made by G. D. Searle & Co.--the 15th such victory for the Chicago pharmaceuticals maker in 19 prosecutions. The jury in U.S. District Judge Rya Zobel's court concluded that the Cu-7 device was not responsible for any alleged injury of the plaintiff, Cindy Nickerson. The jury also found in favor of the other defendant, Ortho Pharmaceuticals, manufacturer of the Lippes Loop intrauterine contraceptive.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
It's like waiting to take a picture of something not happening. Late in January, G. D. Searle & Co. notified doctors that because of the fear of liability suits, it was withdrawing from the market and requesting voluntary return of two of the most common, best-known intrauterine devices. The decision followed the disastrous experience of A. H. Robins Co.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Is there value to be found anywhere in today's perilous stock market? Well, everything's risky, but a lot of the smart money is investing in Monsanto Co., the St. Louis-based chemical company that owns the sugar substitute NutraSweet. The Bessemer Trust, for example, owns almost 1 million shares, says Stanley Nabi, the trust's executive vice president for investment. Bessemer invests old family money, chiefly that of the Phipps family, which made its fortune founding the American steel industry.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1986 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
The timing couldn't have been worse when Alza Corp. introduced its Progestasert intrauterine birth control device a decade ago. It arrived just after A. H. Robins Co. pulled its Dalkon Shield IUD off the market amid allegations that it caused sterility and even death. And Alza's $18 device was twice as expensive as other makes. What's more, women had to replace Alza's IUD annually. Competitors' products lasted three times longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000
Thanks for your feature on UC Berkeley philosophy professor John Searle ("No Limits Hinder UC Thinker," Dec. 28). People sometimes look on the University of California (and other universities) only as prestigious paths to better income populated by stereotyped ivory-tower professors out of touch with "reality." The article on Searle shows the real reason why UC and other universities of its caliber are important. They offer opportunities for people to spend their lives thinking, developing and arguing about ideas that define us as human beings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Astronomer Leonard Searle, a former director of the Carnegie Observatories whose observations provided crucial information in determining the conditions of the Big Bang that created the universe and helped explain how heavy elements are produced in stars, has died. He was 79. Searle died July 2 at his home in Pasadena, according to the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. No cause of death was released. Searle also played a crucial role in the construction of the twin 6.5-meter (255-inch)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | Jim Ruland, Ruland is the author of the story collection "Big Lonesome."
What do Andre Gide, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Yasushi Inoue, Vladimir Nabokov and Tommaso Landolfi have in common? They are authors whose work inspired the five stories in Damion Searls' debut collection, "What We Were Doing and Where We Were Going." For each story, Searls draws from a specific work in each writer's oeuvre: For example, "The Cubicles" is based on Hawthorne's "The Custom-House"; "A Guide to San Francisco" is drawn from Nabokov's "A Guide to Berlin."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Daniel C. Searle, 81, a fourth-generation leader of his family's drug and research company known for the medications Dramamine and Metamucil, died Oct. 30 of complications from emphysema while traveling in Scotland, his son Gideon said. Searle was named president in 1966 and chief executive in 1970, then turned over the chief executive's job to Donald Rumsfeld in 1977, eight years before G.D. Searle & Co. was sold to Monsanto for $2.7 billion. G.D. Searle & Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000
Thanks for your feature on UC Berkeley philosophy professor John Searle ("No Limits Hinder UC Thinker," Dec. 28). People sometimes look on the University of California (and other universities) only as prestigious paths to better income populated by stereotyped ivory-tower professors out of touch with "reality." The article on Searle shows the real reason why UC and other universities of its caliber are important. They offer opportunities for people to spend their lives thinking, developing and arguing about ideas that define us as human beings.
NEWS
December 28, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the photograph that dominates the lobby of Sproul Hall at the University of California, a throng of students marches through Sather Gate, the university's southern entrance. The students carry a banner proclaiming "Free Speech." They are en route to a Board of Regents meeting to demand just that and they are blessed.
BOOKS
March 15, 1998 | ROBERT C. BERWICK, Robert C. Berwick is co-director of MIT's Center for Biological and Computational Learning and MIT professor of computer science. His most recent book is "Cartesian Computation."
Questions about the mind, brain and consciousness engage us like no others--as simple as any but not simple-minded, the preoccupation of philosophers and scientists since Plato. Does a pinprick feel the same to you and me? Do we mean the same thing when we talk about the color gray-green? Or about Picasso's gray-green portrait of Dora Maar? If we could wire up your brain in a vat, would you retain your personality, your experiences, your consciousness?
BUSINESS
March 26, 1985 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
G. D. Searle & Co., maker of the popular NutraSweet sugar substitute, said Monday that it had ended its search for a possible buyer of all or part of the company and would remain independent. The Skokie, Ill.-based pharmaceutical company announced last September that it was exploring a sale at the request of the Searle family, which wanted to diversify its 34% stake. Among the firms that expressed interest in Searle were Pfizer Inc., Monsanto and Angus Chemical Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2012
Joe Clarke Youth basketball icon in Los Angeles Joe Clarke, 75 , a youth basketball icon in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years who founded the Watts Magicians travel team and helped dozens of boys and girls try to reach their basketball dreams on and off the court, died Thursday at Lakewood Regional Medical Center after an illness, according to family friend Ronald Scipio. Born in Panama on Jan. 11, 1936, Clarke teamed with Willie Naulls to create the South-Central L.A. Athletic Club, which evolved into the Watts Magicians travel team.
NEWS
February 8, 1996
Lloyd V. Searle, 83, ergonomics pioneer who developed systems for the military including the first sophisticated pilot training module. A native of Craig City, Okla., Searle was educated at UC Berkeley and Tufts University. He was the author of about 50 professional articles and was widely known for adapting complex military systems for practical, comfortable use by enlisted personnel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the awards she won from Cal Lutheran University last week, graduating senior Karen Searle was most effusive about the pen set. * "I tried it out," Searle told a friend Saturday morning as they gathered with other black-robed classmates for a photo before commencement began. "It really works." Of the 433 undergraduate students who received their degrees Saturday, Searle, who majored in computer-information systems, is one of the least traditional and most successful.
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