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Seashells

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
James McLean stood by Thursday as 10 red, yellow and orange "slit shells," shaped in spirals like toy spinning tops--and very rare--were taken from display at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. "It was one of the better shell displays we had," the mollusk curator said sadly. "They come from very deep water on rocky slopes, none any shallower than about 400 feet, outside the range of scuba divers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
August 23, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
JUST south of Santa Barbara, Lillie Avenue in Summerland has long been a must-pull-over design destination off U.S. 101. This summer, the street boasts some new additions to its mix of Continental galleries, such as Summerhill Antiques, and beach house emporia, including the Consignment Collection. Just Folk is the new tin-roofed kid on the block, housed in a barn-meets-loft space designed by Santa Barbara architect Brian Cearnal.
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NEWS
April 1, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
All along the dazzling white sand beaches embracing this 14-mile-long, 2-mile-wide southwest Florida island, men and women, boys and girls are bent over picking up seashells. From dawn to dusk, all one sees dotting the beaches are derrieres. They call it the "Sanibel stoop." This island is a mecca for seashell collectors, the seashell capital of America.
HOME & GARDEN
May 18, 2006
SEVERAL shell-encrusted items are pictured in the beautiful home of Cameron Brunner ["Shabby Chic, All Grown Up," May 11]. I have noticed in catalogs and home stores that seashells (and the remains of sea creatures such as sea stars and urchins) are widely available in many forms: crafted into candles, adorning mirrors, and even overlaying entire pieces of furniture such as dressers and tables. The shells are also sold by the bag at craft stores, import emporiums and discount stores. This leads me to wonder from where these treasures are being harvested and if the creatures or their environment are being harmed in the process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1991 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Ferguson of Wilmington is a living tongue twister: He sells seashells by the seashore. His decades-old business less than a mile from the Port of Los Angeles is a shrine to the mollusk. And Ferguson, a portly 60-year-old fond of seashell print shirts, is a sheller extraordinaire.
HOME & GARDEN
August 23, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
JUST south of Santa Barbara, Lillie Avenue in Summerland has long been a must-pull-over design destination off U.S. 101. This summer, the street boasts some new additions to its mix of Continental galleries, such as Summerhill Antiques, and beach house emporia, including the Consignment Collection. Just Folk is the new tin-roofed kid on the block, housed in a barn-meets-loft space designed by Santa Barbara architect Brian Cearnal.
HOME & GARDEN
May 18, 2006
SEVERAL shell-encrusted items are pictured in the beautiful home of Cameron Brunner ["Shabby Chic, All Grown Up," May 11]. I have noticed in catalogs and home stores that seashells (and the remains of sea creatures such as sea stars and urchins) are widely available in many forms: crafted into candles, adorning mirrors, and even overlaying entire pieces of furniture such as dressers and tables. The shells are also sold by the bag at craft stores, import emporiums and discount stores. This leads me to wonder from where these treasures are being harvested and if the creatures or their environment are being harmed in the process.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | THOMAS J. SHEERAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Pentagon is trying to find out what makes reindeer antlers and seashells so tough but light. The answer could mean better protection for soldiers and pilots, as well as stronger cars, medical implants and bowling balls. "We need very lightweight, thin, high-strength materials," said Wilbur C. Simmons of the Army Research Office near Durham, N.C., which commissioned the $2-million study. Researchers at three universities are involved in the five-year project.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Miscellaneous Instruments category in Down Beat's annual polls has always been a kind of catchall grouping. This year, typically, it encompassed Toots Thielemans' harmonica (which won), Bela Fleck's banjo, Howard Johnson's tuba and Erik Friedlander's cello. But it's unlikely that there has ever been a more unusual entry than Steve Turre's conch shells.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | Associated Press
The knobbed whelk will take its place beside the live oak, the brown thrasher and the Cherokee rose as an official state object under legislation approved Wednesday by the Georgia House. The resolution, sent to the Senate, designates the knobbed whelk as the official state seashell.
TRAVEL
December 1, 2002 | By Susan Spano
Sanibel Island, Fla. -- Seen on the beach here: Florida fighting conchs, sand dollars, tapering lightning whelks, calico scallops, spiky murexes, kitten's paws, all abundant and free for the taking, assuming the little critters these shells once housed have moved on. Shells may be hard to find on other beaches, but they wash ashore in piles on Sanibel and Captiva, two slender barrier islands connected by a bridge off the west coast of Florida....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Miscellaneous Instruments category in Down Beat's annual polls has always been a kind of catchall grouping. This year, typically, it encompassed Toots Thielemans' harmonica (which won), Bela Fleck's banjo, Howard Johnson's tuba and Erik Friedlander's cello. But it's unlikely that there has ever been a more unusual entry than Steve Turre's conch shells.
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
Impatiens. They are perhaps the most loved, and hated, of flowers. Non-gardeners adore the No. 1 selling bedding plant because it is so easy to grow and always in bloom--so constant it seems extruded from plastic. Some serious gardeners wouldn't plant one if their horticultural life depended on it because they're so common. But while the common impatiens are being praised or pilloried, growers have been busy developing and discovering new kinds.
TRAVEL
February 21, 1999 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
Florida The 37th Annual Conch Shell Blowing Contest, March 20 at Sunset Pier in Key West, draws hundreds of spectators and dozens of contestants. "Musicians" blow their best renditions of popular and classical music. The conch (pronounced "konk") shell has a long history in the Keys; it was used by the Calusa Indians to communicate over long distances, and today boat captains toot them to signal departures. The contest begins at 10 a.m. with trophies awarded in five age categories.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | TIM SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Henry Galiano walks through the maze of basement rooms that make up his work area, waving offhandedly at the human skeletons, fist-sized insects and desiccated lizards. "We sell everything," says Galiano, a self-taught paleontologist who took a passion for dead things and a decade of experience at the American Museum of Natural History and began a retail career in the bone business. "Everything I like."
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Max Jacobson reviews restaurants every Friday in Valley Life!
Good news for finicky eaters with no time to cook: More and more upscale restaurants are starting takeout spinoffs. Bistro Garden at Coldwater recently launched a takeout operation, and now Dieter Wantig and Christian Desmet have opened The Foodshell, a takeout kitchen on the other side of Ventura Boulevard from their well-known Seashell. At this rate, some day the San Fernando Valley's more complacent Chinese restaurants may wake up and wonder where all the phone orders went.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | Associated Press
The knobbed whelk, a cylindrical shell distinguished by a knob on top, has become Georgia's official seashell. The state Senate voted Wednesday in favor of the resolution, which already had passed in the House. It does not require the approval of Gov. Joe Frank Harris.
SPORTS
November 30, 1987 | SCOTT OSTLER
My mail tends to be horribly boring. A lot of weekly team press releases, invitations to press conferences to unveil plans for big bass-fishing tournaments, desperate queries from the expense-account department, occasional critical letters from readers, mostly in crayon. The other day, though, I got an interesting and disturbing letter from a woman in Texas who is very angry at me if I'm the person she thinks I might be, which I am not.
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