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TRAVEL
December 20, 2009 | From The Los Angeles Times
MEXICO Seaside gem We discovered a jewel just an hour's drive northeast of Cabo. This seaside villa offers outstanding snorkeling, hiking, fishing. El Encanto del Cabo Pulmo , Cabo Pulmo; (619) 822-2192, www.encantopulmo.com. E-mail is recommended: info@encantopulmo.com . Rooms from $90. -- Lori Gray, Malibu
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TRAVEL
February 21, 2014 | By Ryan Ritchie
With a population of about 1,500, the 2-square-mile town of Summerland, Calif., epitomizes the cliché "Blink and you'll miss it. " Do your best not to blink as you drive through because this sleepy beach community six miles from Santa Barbara is home to an array of mom-and-pop antiques shops, a handful of local eateries and the sorts of views that make you want to do the good kind of nothing all day. The tab: a king bed at the Inn on Summer Hill begins...
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TRAVEL
February 21, 2014 | By Ryan Ritchie
With a population of about 1,500, the 2-square-mile town of Summerland, Calif., epitomizes the cliché "Blink and you'll miss it. " Do your best not to blink as you drive through because this sleepy beach community six miles from Santa Barbara is home to an array of mom-and-pop antiques shops, a handful of local eateries and the sorts of views that make you want to do the good kind of nothing all day. The tab: a king bed at the Inn on Summer Hill begins...
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013
Ah - this was a Travel section [Sept. 29] that could be applied to the lives of ordinary middle-class SoCal readers. Regarding "Fairer Approach to Ticket Changes" by Catharine Hamm [On the Spot]: Rebooking fees are the bane of the average person; hey, I have to work hard for $100. I just rebooked two canceled round-trip tickets on Alaska Air at $100 per ticket. Why had we canceled? Because my brother-in-law was dying when we were supposed to travel. No sympathy from the airline; rebooking fees applied.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | From Times wire services
A Turkish-Cypriot court today sentenced a West Berlin mother and daughter to prison for killing a rapist who attacked them in a lonely seaside camping site. Uthe Loh, 48, got four years in prison. Her daughter Melani, 20, got three years. The court said that by the time of his death Ozmen Tulga, 20, was weakened by his struggles with the two tourists and no longer posed a threat to them. It also said the women had failed to run away. The women, who came to Cyprus on vacation in March, sat impassively in the dock.
TRAVEL
July 23, 2000
Recently I spent a few days in Northumberland and heartily endorse everything Nancy J. Baird wrote about this part of northeastern England ("Rambles in Castle Country," July 16). I strongly recommend Northumberland to anyone who likes to get away from the more usual tourist areas. However, I am sorry that Baird did not mention one gastronomic delight prepared in the seaside village of Craster: kippers. The odor emanating from the smokehouse will long remain in my memory, as will my enjoyment of the pair of buttered kippers that I had for breakfast the next morning.
TRAVEL
April 9, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers
Until George Bush began strolling through his hometown as a presidential candidate, about the last thing of note that had happened here was the Historical Society's recovery of the old fog bell from Goat Island lighthouse a few miles offshore in the Atlantic. If you include being totally wiped out by Indians in 1689, Kennebunkport has been home to a few historic events since its founding in 1653. Yet during its 300-plus years it has hardly been a Lexington or Concord. Farming, fishing and sawmills along inland streams and the Kennebunk River were the first economic activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1989
I live on the Balboa peninsula, a residential community now in its third year under siege by the out-of-town adolescent scofflaws known as "cruisers." They swarm through our neighborhoods, creating chaos and gridlock with impunity. Our homes are rocked by the outlandish din of their thundering stereos, blaring horns, roaring engines, snarling motorcycles, screeching brakes, piercing whistles and maniacal shrieks, screams and howls. Our city authorities, who welcomed the vanguard of the youthful invaders in the spring of 1986 with assurances that they wanted "everybody to have a good time" and wouldn't "rain on anyone's parade," have steadfastly refused to take any effective action to discourage the "cruisers" and restore order.
NEWS
October 20, 1985
The Times article about Wilmington's woes (Oct. 6) was excellent and applies to San Pedro as well. Both of these port cities generate millions of dollars in port usage and rental fees and yet these communities never benefit from this revenue. San Pedro and Wilmington residents must put up with increased noise, traffic, wear and tear of streets and increased lights at night. We who live here know that the city of Los Angeles does not care about our quality of life. All one needs to do is drive through Wilmington and San Pedro and witness the decay in the parks, roads, schools and business districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 400 San Pedro residents applauded, booed and cheered at a public hearing this week of the San Pedro Community Plan Advisory Committee, which is considering restrictions on apartment and condominium construction in the seaside community. After the meeting, members of the committee--appointed earlier this year by Councilwoman Joan Milke Flores--split on how restrictive they should make an interim control ordinance that would halt development while new zoning regulations are considered.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The massive fire that destroyed several blocks of the beloved Seaside Park boardwalk in New Jersey last week was caused by faulty electrical wiring, officials announced Tuesday. A task force of investigators that included state and local fire marshals, county prosecutors, and local police made the determination after examining debris, mapping electric currents at the time of the fire, and examining possible financial motives. “This was not an intentional fire,” Ocean County prosecutor Joseph D. Coronato said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
In Edwidge Danticat's fiercely beautiful new novel, "Claire of the Sea Light," a rose comes to life on the edge of the water. Ville Rose is a fictional seaside town in Haiti, home to 11,000 people some 20 miles outside the country's teeming capital city, Port-au-Prince. Seen from the mountains that rise above it, the town's shape is that of a flower, "like the unfurling petals of a massive tropical rose," Danticat writes. The main road in Ville Rose is Avenue Pied Rose, or Stem Rose Avenue, and the many alleys are called épines , or thorns, an apt metaphor for the complex relationships among the town's residents.
TRAVEL
June 9, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
Way back in the 20th century when life was simple, my wife, Mary Frances, and I lived in Carpinteria, swooping in and out of Santa Barbara without a second thought. Nowadays, returning as Angelenos with a 9-year-old, we have second and third thoughts, as we consider cost, balance kid stuff and adult stuff, and consult the school calendar. But we managed a great visit a few months ago, thanks to a hotel that gave us creature comforts and walking access to great food, historic atmosphere and the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2013 | By Lee Romney and Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Two Santa Cruz police officers were killed in a shootout and a suspect was fatally wounded Tuesday afternoon in a burst of violence that rocked the eclectic seaside community. The shootings began about 3:30 p.m., when a man opened fire on two Santa Cruz Police Department officers conducting a follow-up criminal investigation at a home, law enforcement authorities said. Both officers were fatally wounded and the gunman fled. PHOTOS: Killing of 2 Santa Cruz police officers Late Tuesday, the slain officers were identified as 10-year veteran Elizabeth Butler, originally from Torrance, and Loren "Butch" Baker, a 28-year veteran.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
On ltsukushima island, off the coast of Hiroshima in Japan, Steve Kato photographed the torii that stands in front of 12 th century ltsukushima Shinto Shrine. At high tide, water surrounds the vermillion gate, which stands about 52 feet high. Kato and his wife, Kathleen, visited ltsukushima in spring 2011, just in time to see its cherry blossoms in full bloom. The San Gabriel resident used a Nikon D60. To submit your photos, visit our reader photo gallery . When you upload your photos, tell us where they were taken and when.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Harry Lawrence, the globe-trotting former owner of an Asian art and antiques import shop in Laguna Beach whose contributions to civic improvements over the decades earned him the nickname Mr. Laguna, has died. He was 97. Lawrence died Sunday of kidney failure in Mission Hospital Laguna Beach, said his wife, Zahide. A resident of Laguna since 1947 — after he and his late first wife, Maxine, bought Warren Imports on South Coast Highway — Lawrence spent the ensuing decades as a major civic force in the picturesque seaside community.
NEWS
October 19, 2002
The Ocean Institute in Dana Point has its grand opening today. The $16.5-million renovation quadrupled the size of the complex. Students will use a variety of hands-on equipment to learn about marine science in the complex's six buildings.
NEWS
July 10, 1997
Jazz and gazpacho can be a lyrical--and palatable--combo, especially when served atop a 150-foot bluff overlooking the Pacific. More than 650 guests of the Ritz-Carlton in Dana Point were treated Sunday to alfresco dining and jazz-pop-soul-funk-driven rhythms.
WORLD
May 16, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Futoshi Toba arrived at the hillside Buddhist temple just after dawn, hours before the other mourners, on the April day he bid farewell to his wife, Yumi. He found the small urn containing her ashes among a solemn sea of containers for the 1,500 residents of Rikuzentakata who died in Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami. Toba, 46, laid a white chrysanthemum next to his wife's remains. He said a brief prayer, and made her a promise. Holding back tears, he vowed to raise the couple's two young sons to become good men. "I swore I would do the best job I could in rebuilding this town," he said later, "but I said this place would never be the same without her. " Toba is mayor of the town of 23,000 in northern Japan, a job he took barely a month before an unstoppable wall of water turned the seaside community into a wasteland of shattered lives and scattered wreckage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
Staff Sgt. Vincent W. Ashlock put in nearly 10 years in the active-duty Army as a young man. After he left, his yearning to get back in uniform never waned. Three years ago, he signed up with the California Army National Guard and found himself, at age 42, staffing dangerous checkpoints south of Baghdad. "Getting back into the service was his mission in life," said his mother, Margot Stengel. "When he went to Iraq, he said: 'I finally feel like a man.' He just felt good about what he was doing.
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