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Seasonal Affective Disorder

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NATIONAL
March 3, 2010 | By Megan Twohey
Since she was hired two years ago as a medical assistant, Jennifer Simonsis has come to an agreement with her employer: During the winter, she gets time off to see her doctor, frequent breaks and help in setting up a light-therapy lamp at her desk. Simonsis gets workplace accommodations for seasonal affective disorder, or SAD -- depression triggered by limited daylight in winter. Pointing to a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against the disabled, some SAD sufferers say they are entitled to schedule changes, access to windows and other modifications.
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NATIONAL
December 19, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Karyn Anastasio would have preferred staying in bed, ignoring the early onset of cold and darkness as she huddled in her apartment and watched TV. Instead, Anastasio and her friend, Christina Kaelberer, who also dreads winter, were walking through the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and listening to a tiny woman rave about the surroundings and emphasize how lovely they would be when ice covered the ponds, when white coated the ground, when the...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1997 | KEN WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When people set their clocks forward this weekend for daylight saving time, more is at stake than that lost hour of sleep. For the millions who suffer from seasonal affective disorder, the time change brings some relief from the depression of the winter months. "In October, when the clocks are rolled back, people find it depressing because there is less daylight" in their waking day, said Suzanne Kline, an Anaheim psychologist who treats depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Chris Barton
The greatest of all holiday specials, " A Charlie Brown Christmas ," is on ABC at 8 tonight [Thursday]. (It's also available to stream free via Hulu.) Last year, I wrote about its music, which is some of my favorite music of all time. Unable to restate it any better, I offer the story again here. It's here. The holiday season. And with it, an ever-creeping onslaught of music stuffed with enough synthetic cheer to weave a polyester overcoat for Dodger Stadium. Hearing such tidings of great joy seems innocent enough, but repeated exposure could very well cause outbreaks of seasonal affective disorder on sunny days.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | ELLEN UZELAC, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Martha Roderick has never been much of a morning person, and living in Anchorage, where she had to get up one recent Sunday long before the sun finally rose at 9:13, it's sometimes difficult for her to do much more than snarl. Here in Alaska--where length of residency is measured in terms of winters rather than years--the long nights that plunge much of the state into darkness for weeks can manipulate moods and alter body clocks. Alaska winters certainly let Roderick know who is master.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Karyn Anastasio would have preferred staying in bed, ignoring the early onset of cold and darkness as she huddled in her apartment and watched TV. Instead, Anastasio and her friend, Christina Kaelberer, who also dreads winter, were walking through the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and listening to a tiny woman rave about the surroundings and emphasize how lovely they would be when ice covered the ponds, when white coated the ground, when the...
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
If you’re feeling just a little depressed and lethargic  this time of year, go ahead and blame the universe – specifically the sun. The cause may be seasonal affective disorder, which ties the blahs to waning winter sunlight. SAD, as it's called, usually affects people who live in northern states where days are short and darker during winter months. This HealthKey article lists symptoms as: "… Oversleeping, daytime fatigue, carbohydrate craving and weight gain as signs of SAD, as well as symptoms of generalized depression, such as decreased sexual interest, lethargy, hopelessness, suicidal thoughts and loss of interest in your normal activities.
HEALTH
March 5, 2007 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Daylight saving time begins three weeks earlier this year and lasts one week longer -- welcome news for people who relish the extra afternoon light to garden, ride a bicycle, walk the dog or just take out the trash when they can still see the curb. But the extension, which begins Sunday, could actually make millions of Americans feel less sunny.
NEWS
November 17, 1997
Gray skies make grumpy people, experts on seasonal affective disorder confirm. "Less hours of sunlight affect the balance of the neurochemistry of the brain," said assistant psychology professor Sheila Grant of Cal State Northridge. And with weather demon El Nino purportedly on the way, Grant and her colleagues anticipate more SAD cases. * EATING, SLEEPING: Symptoms of the disorder, which afflicts an estimated 3% of Americans, are midnight runs to the fridge, moodiness and alienation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Chris Barton
The greatest of all holiday specials, " A Charlie Brown Christmas ," is on ABC at 8 tonight [Thursday]. (It's also available to stream free via Hulu.) Last year, I wrote about its music, which is some of my favorite music of all time. Unable to restate it any better, I offer the story again here. It's here. The holiday season. And with it, an ever-creeping onslaught of music stuffed with enough synthetic cheer to weave a polyester overcoat for Dodger Stadium. Hearing such tidings of great joy seems innocent enough, but repeated exposure could very well cause outbreaks of seasonal affective disorder on sunny days.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
In the category of “high-class problems,” having a show whose return is anticipated so feverishly that it's inevitably going to be something of a letdown is pretty near the top of the list, but that's the cross that Matt Weiner, creator of “Mad Men,” has to bear after Sunday's slow-moving, two-hour-plus season premiere, "The Doorway. " Things almost always get off to a slow start on this show, as if Weiner knows our brains might explode if too much happens right out of the gate, but even by those standards “The Doorway” was, until the last few minutes, a notably and, I think, willfully uneventful episode.
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
If you’re feeling just a little depressed and lethargic  this time of year, go ahead and blame the universe – specifically the sun. The cause may be seasonal affective disorder, which ties the blahs to waning winter sunlight. SAD, as it's called, usually affects people who live in northern states where days are short and darker during winter months. This HealthKey article lists symptoms as: "… Oversleeping, daytime fatigue, carbohydrate craving and weight gain as signs of SAD, as well as symptoms of generalized depression, such as decreased sexual interest, lethargy, hopelessness, suicidal thoughts and loss of interest in your normal activities.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2010 | By Megan Twohey
Since she was hired two years ago as a medical assistant, Jennifer Simonsis has come to an agreement with her employer: During the winter, she gets time off to see her doctor, frequent breaks and help in setting up a light-therapy lamp at her desk. Simonsis gets workplace accommodations for seasonal affective disorder, or SAD -- depression triggered by limited daylight in winter. Pointing to a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against the disabled, some SAD sufferers say they are entitled to schedule changes, access to windows and other modifications.
HEALTH
May 28, 2007 | By Victoria Clayton, Special to The Times
SUNSHINE and warm weather aren't for everyone. Take 30-year-old Saskia Smith, an illustrator who works part time in the billing department of a legal firm. She spent most of last summer's dog days prone in bed with the velvet drapes in her Mid-City apartment pulled tightly shut. "Other times of year, I'm basically an upbeat person," Smith says. "But when summer hits, it's like I'm operating on a low battery. Last summer, I had no desire to eat, I lost 15 pounds, I had anxiety attacks and I stopped seeing any of my friends.
HEALTH
March 5, 2007 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Daylight saving time begins three weeks earlier this year and lasts one week longer -- welcome news for people who relish the extra afternoon light to garden, ride a bicycle, walk the dog or just take out the trash when they can still see the curb. But the extension, which begins Sunday, could actually make millions of Americans feel less sunny.
NEWS
December 18, 2005 | Rachel D'Oro, Associated Press Writer
Lloyd Leavitt shrugs off the subzero freeze that blankets the Arctic town of Barrow each winter. It's the weeks of endless night that get to him, filling him with insatiable cravings for carbs, sleep and natural light. "There comes a time when you don't know if it's morning or evening. You get confused," said Leavitt, who has lived all his 49 years in the nation's highest-latitude community. Leavitt has plenty of company when it comes to dealing with Alaska's dark side.
HEALTH
May 28, 2007 | By Victoria Clayton, Special to The Times
SUNSHINE and warm weather aren't for everyone. Take 30-year-old Saskia Smith, an illustrator who works part time in the billing department of a legal firm. She spent most of last summer's dog days prone in bed with the velvet drapes in her Mid-City apartment pulled tightly shut. "Other times of year, I'm basically an upbeat person," Smith says. "But when summer hits, it's like I'm operating on a low battery. Last summer, I had no desire to eat, I lost 15 pounds, I had anxiety attacks and I stopped seeing any of my friends.
HEALTH
January 15, 2001 | RAY HOGAN, STAMFORD ADVOCATE
It's the middle of the afternoon, you've been at work for more than five hours and you can't seem to stay awake, let alone stop yawning or focus on your current task. For many Americans, the scenario is all too familiar. The reasons for such afternoon lulls range from the scientific to the obvious, from clinically diagnosed conditions to simply not having had enough sleep. For whatever reasons, these symptoms also seem more pronounced in the winter. They also can be overcome.
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