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Seat Belt Law

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985 | United Press International
A state Supreme Court judge has upheld the constitutionality of New York's seat belt law. The ruling by Justice Myron Tillman last week was the first state court review of the 11-month-old law, which requires front seat occupants and children under age 10 to wear safety belts and imposes fines of up to $50 on violators. The issue has not yet come before the state's highest court, the Court of Appeals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 15, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Americans are buckling up their seat belts at an all-time high rate, the Department of Transportation said Thursday. An annual survey by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that nationwide seat belt use has climbed to 86% this year from 84% last year and 58% back in 1994, when the agency first started studying seat belt use patterns. The adoption of seat belt laws in most states has increased seat belt use, the agency said. “Thanks to the ongoing work of our state and local partners and national efforts such as 'Click It or Ticket,' we've made steady gains in belt use in recent years,” said NHTSA Administrator David Strickland. “Moving forward, it will be critical to build on this success using a multi-faceted approach that combines good laws, effective enforcement, and public education and awareness.” Seat belt use increased the most in the South during the past year, up to 85% from 80%. The Western U.S. has the most seat belt use at 94% of occupants, up from 93% last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1986
The California seat belt law is reminiscent of George Orwell's novel, "1984," in which even the slightest details of our everyday lives are closely regulated and scrutinized by "Big Brother." There have been many attempts to justify this law, but there is only one concept involved here, and that is whatever measures an individual considers necessary or not necessary for his personal well-being should be entirely his own decision, and not the decision of anyone else.
OPINION
April 3, 2011
Another way to skirt the War Powers Act Re "Presidents can't declare war? Just watch them," Opinion, March 29 Michael Kinsley is correct that it is the function of Congress to declare war. However, the wars since World War II have not been wars. They have been "police actions. " The Constitution has nothing to say about those. Therefore, the president can declare these "police actions" without consulting Congress, God or the devil. The Korean War, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and now Libya have all been "police actions," not wars, even if millions of people have died in these little squabbles.
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | United Press International
The Israeli government on Sunday imposed a mandatory seat-belt law to try to curb the number of injuries from auto accidents in a nation where more people have died on the roads than in all five wars combined. Before Sunday, people in the front seat were only required to wear seat belts when traveling on highways outside cities. Under the new six-month, experimental rule, they will be required to wear the restraints at all times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1985
The Times was "right on" in its editorial (June 7), "Tighten Your Seat-Belt Law," recommending that the Legislature act on passing mandatory seat-belt laws. The Times' crisp, to-the-point evaluation and summary was in the public interest and in the interest of saving lives NOW! For your information, New York officials, according to recent reports, now estimate that as many as 500 lives may be saved by that state's mandatory seat-belt law. On behalf of the Los Angeles Motor Car Dealers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1992
Gov. Pete Wilson signed legislation Tuesday that allows police officers to pull over and cite motorists solely for failing to buckle their seat belts. Under current law, police cannot cite motorists for violating the state's mandatory seat belt law unless they have been stopped for a separate offense. Violators of the new law would pay a maximum $20 fine for the first offense and $50 for subsequent violations. The law extends to 1996, when it will be re-evaluated.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | Associated Press
A bill making Nevada the 28th state with a mandatory auto seat belt law was signed Monday by Gov. Dick Bryan, who said there is "compelling evidence" that such legislation saves lives and reduces injuries in accidents. The law taking effect July 1 allows courts to fine drivers or passengers $25 if they are caught without seat belts fastened. If a minor is not wearing a belt, the driver could be cited, but no more than one ticket can be given if neither driver nor minor is belted.
NEWS
March 1, 1986
The free ride is over today for motorists who may have ignored California's new seat belt law. Most police agencies throughout the state have observed a 60-day moratorium on issuing citations to drivers or passengers who do not fasten their seat belts while a vehicle is in motion. But the grace period ended Friday. Starting today, California Highway Patrol Commissioner James Smith said, "if you are not wearing a seat belt, you are risking a citation."
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | United Press International
The new law requiring California motorists and their passengers to wear seat belts is "living up to its promise" to save lives, the commissioner of the Highway Patrol said Tuesday. CHP Commissioner James Smith said motor vehicle deaths dropped by 11% during the first four months of this year and that the increased use of seat belts was a "major factor" in the decline. The seat belt law took effect Jan. 1. "We think California's seat belt law is living up to its promise," he said.
NEWS
January 3, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Good news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- seat belt use is up and crash deaths are down, according to information released Tuesday. The percentage of adults who always wear seat belts rose from 80% to 85% between 2002 and 2008, according to the CDC. Officials credit better and stricter laws on seat belt use for part of the rise: In 1982, before the first state law required seat belts to be used, only 11% of people strapped in. But as of 2010, 19 states populated by a quarter of adult Americans did not have a primary seat belt law, and 1 in 7 adults still don't wear their seat belts on every trip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2006 | Lynn Doan, Times Staff Writer
"Click it or ticket" -- unless you're a Los Angeles police officer. Those who regularly ticket drivers for not wearing their seat belts often commit the same offense, and that bothers supervisors in the Los Angeles Police Department. George Gascon, an LAPD assistant chief, said he was riding in a patrol car recently with an officer who remained unbuckled, despite the presence of a superior. Gascon said he subtly tried to get the officer to buckle up by playing around with his own seat belt.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
The frequency of seat belt use increased in 37 states this year, a fact that federal highway safety officials attribute to greater awareness and police enforcement. Arizona and Hawaii achieved seat belt use rates of more than 95%, the highest ever reported, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said. The national seat belt use rate in 2004 was 80%, also an all-time high. Mississippi improved its seat belt use rate by 1.6% but still had the lowest rate in the nation at 63.2%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two brothers on a Southern California freeway at 3:30 a.m. One is wearing a seat belt and the other isn't when the car slams into a guardrail. The one who isn't wearing a seat belt is ejected from the car and killed. The other one walks away with minor injuries. No one knows whether a seat belt would have saved the life of Andre Stewart, the Newport Harbor High School football star who died a week ago in a crash on the Pomona Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two brothers on a Southern California freeway at 3:30 a.m. One is wearing a seat belt and the other isn't when the car slams into a guardrail. The one who isn't wearing a seat belt is ejected from the car and killed. The other one walks away with minor injuries. No one knows whether a seat belt would have saved the life of Andre Stewart, the Newport Harbor High School football star who died a week ago in a crash on the Pomona Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An early-morning crash on the San Diego Freeway killed an 18-year-old Huntington Beach woman not wearing a safety belt, an incident that law enforcement said underscores a persistent problem: Many back-seat passengers don't bother to buckle up.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An early-morning crash on the San Diego Freeway killed an 18-year-old Huntington Beach woman not wearing a safety belt, an incident that authorities said underscores a persistent problem: Many back-seat passengers don't bother to buckle up.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | From Reuters
Federal traffic safety officials Tuesday urged state governments to toughen their seat belt laws, beef up enforcement and require children under 13 years old to sit in the back seats of cars. The nonbinding recommendations by the National Transportation Safety Board were among about two dozen points unanimously adopted by the agency in an effort to cut traffic fatalities by increasing Americans' use of seat belts and reassessing the way air bags are deployed in car crashes.
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