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September 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Goodwill Games organizers are in imminent danger of going broke, a Carlsbad, Calif., company contended in documents filed shortly before settling a lawsuit seeking $800,000 for work at the Olympic-style event. The settlement was reached Thursday night, hours after lawyers for International Events Management Ltd. released documents that contended the Seattle Organizing Committee had underestimated its debt by more than $1.18 million. Terms of the settlement were withheld.
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SPORTS
September 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Goodwill Games organizers are in imminent danger of going broke, a Carlsbad, Calif., company contended in documents filed shortly before settling a lawsuit seeking $800,000 for work at the Olympic-style event. The settlement was reached Thursday night, hours after lawyers for International Events Management Ltd. released documents that contended the Seattle Organizing Committee had underestimated its debt by more than $1.18 million. Terms of the settlement were withheld.
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SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Organizers of the Goodwill Games said today after a White House meeting that there is a good chance President Bush and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev will visit the competition this summer in Seattle. "The feeling at the White House is very favorable," said the Rev. William J. Sullivan, chairman of the board of directors for the Seattle Organizing Committee. "It is my own personal judgment that if President Bush decides to come, I think Mr. Gorbachev in all probability would come too."
SPORTS
July 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Three Soviet planes have arrived in Seattle for the Goodwill Games, but not before surprising the U.S. Air Force, which was expecting them a day later and had to scramble jets to intercept them over Alaska. An Ilyushin-62 passenger plane carrying Goodwill Games visitors and alternative Soviet art, accompanied by two SU-27 military jet fighters, left the Soviet Union today.
SPORTS
July 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Three Soviet planes have arrived in Seattle for the Goodwill Games, but not before surprising the U.S. Air Force, which was expecting them a day later and had to scramble jets to intercept them over Alaska. An Ilyushin-62 passenger plane carrying Goodwill Games visitors and alternative Soviet art, accompanied by two SU-27 military jet fighters, left the Soviet Union Friday.
SPORTS
October 28, 1988 | Tracy Dodds
The 44 United States swimmers who competed in the Olympics at Seoul were accompanied and advised by a contingent of 17 coaches, including Richard Quick, the designated head coach. Quick, as coach of the outstanding University of Texas women's team, had several of his Longhorn swimmers on the U.S. team. He was responsible for coaching them all the way through, as well as making the decisions about which swimmers would swim which legs of relays.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
When members of the Seattle Organizing Committee sat down to plan the 1990 Goodwill Games here, they felt swimming, figure skating and gymnastics were just a start. They wanted Ted Turner's huge international sporting event to have a cultural side too. The result? The Goodwill Games themselves don't start until July 20, but beginning Monday is the Goodwill Arts Festival, four weeks of world-class productions and mini-festivals. Budgeted at $12.
SPORTS
August 6, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Ted Turner gets his way, which he usually does, the Goodwill Games, like Rocky movies, will continue long after critics contend they have outlived their usefulness. But at least Sylvester Stallone could claim after the first two Rocky movies that his creation was a financial and perhaps even an artistic success. Upon conclusion Sunday of Goodwill Games II, Turner can make only half that statement. "The athletic competition was first rate," he said at a news conference Saturday.
SPORTS
July 20, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1986, the first Goodwill Games in the Soviet Union had one star. R.E. (Ted) Turner was creator, bankroller, broadcaster, promoter and philosopher. "Those aren't Communist dogs," he said one day while watching two strays cross a Moscow boulevard and making a point about equality among men. "Those are just dogs."
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