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NEWS
December 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Union leaders are recommending that employees of the Seattle Times reject a contract offer intended to settle a strike that began more than five weeks ago. Meanwhile, employees of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer agreed to return to work next week after approving their contract. Back-to-work details for Times employees remained among the biggest sticking points in ending the strike by the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild, said Ron Judd, a union spokesman. Times President H.
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NEWS
December 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Union leaders are recommending that employees of the Seattle Times reject a contract offer intended to settle a strike that began more than five weeks ago. Meanwhile, employees of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer agreed to return to work next week after approving their contract. Back-to-work details for Times employees remained among the biggest sticking points in ending the strike by the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild, said Ron Judd, a union spokesman. Times President H.
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NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, one of the city's two strike-hit newspapers, ended a 38-day strike by approving a new contract, but wrangling over who could return to work, and when, threatened resolution of the walkout at the Seattle Times. The P-I contract offers a smaller hourly wage increase than the guild had wanted but increases company contributions to health plans. The hang-up at the Times is over back-to-work provisions.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, one of the city's two strike-hit newspapers, ended a 38-day strike by approving a new contract, but wrangling over who could return to work, and when, threatened resolution of the walkout at the Seattle Times. The P-I contract offers a smaller hourly wage increase than the guild had wanted but increases company contributions to health plans. The hang-up at the Times is over back-to-work provisions.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1999 | James F. Peltz
Alaska Airlines said it was "outraged and offended" by a report in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer asserting that the carrier "has avoided some major [safety] fines" because certain senior government inspectors have given the airline favorable treatment. The newspaper said some inspectors who allegedly found problems at Seattle-based Alaska Airlines received "heat rather than praise from their bosses," which let the airline sidestep penalties.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A top Nordstrom Inc. executive called a Seattle newspaper's coverage of the retailer's labor problems "horrible," but he said the company's decision to cut advertising in the paper wasn't meant as retaliation. Co-chairman Jim Nordstrom said the company was only taking a closer look at the effectiveness of its advertising. Nordstrom spokeswoman Megan McKenzie said the company told The Seattle Times and Seattle Post-Intelligencer on Friday that it was cutting back on its ads.
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ken Griffey, who made major league baseball history by playing on the same team with his son last season, signed a one-year contract with the Seattle Mariners. Griffey, 40, will receive about $700,000 in base salary plus games-played incentives that could boost his salary to nearly $1 million, according to the Seattle Post Intelligencer. The newspaper also said that Ken Griffey Jr.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1996 | From Associated Press
Because of a rising number of purchase orders, aircraft maker Boeing Co. reportedly plans to add 5,000 jobs this year. It would be Boeing's first work force increase in five years. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper reported the staffing plans over the weekend, citing unidentified sources. Company representatives would not confirm the report. The Seattle-based company's work force shrank from about 161,000 to 105,000 over the last five years.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2002 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities said Tuesday that they have arrested a Muslim activist who has been identified in a law enforcement document as a possible Al Qaeda operative with ties to a radical London cleric, the Taliban and a terrorist training camp in Oregon. James Ujaama, 36, was arrested in Denver on Monday on a material witness warrant, in connection with a federal grand jury investigation in northern Virginia into terrorist activity in the United States, a federal law enforcement official said.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Washington State posed a health alert this month against eating too many fish from behind the famous Grand Coulee Dam. The reason: Dioxin contamination from upriver in British Columbia. Politicians representing coastal Washington are fuming over spending millions of dollars to upgrade sewage treatment plants along Puget Sound. The reason: The capitol of British Columbia, Victoria, is dumping its sewage into the cold blue waters of the sound untreated.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1999 | James F. Peltz
Alaska Airlines said it was "outraged and offended" by a report in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer asserting that the carrier "has avoided some major [safety] fines" because certain senior government inspectors have given the airline favorable treatment. The newspaper said some inspectors who allegedly found problems at Seattle-based Alaska Airlines received "heat rather than praise from their bosses," which let the airline sidestep penalties.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A top Nordstrom Inc. executive called a Seattle newspaper's coverage of the retailer's labor problems "horrible," but he said the company's decision to cut advertising in the paper wasn't meant as retaliation. Co-chairman Jim Nordstrom said the company was only taking a closer look at the effectiveness of its advertising. Nordstrom spokeswoman Megan McKenzie said the company told The Seattle Times and Seattle Post-Intelligencer on Friday that it was cutting back on its ads.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the help of the U.S. Supreme Court, freelance writers have successfully wrestled the New York Times and other publishers to the mat, forcing them either to pay up for past work or to delete it from online archives. But if freelance writers now have powerful publishers in a literary half-Nelson, it is the unassuming news librarians who are taking a chair to the head. Now that the Constitution has been safeguarded and lofty copyright principles upheld anew, the real work begins.
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