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Seattle Supersonics Basketball Team

SPORTS
May 8, 1998 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corie Blount wants to come back next season and ride the bench some more. The desire isn't actually to be a reserve, as far down the depth chart at power forward as third string, but the lure of the affiliation is greater than the lure of an increased role, so Blount has accepted that the bench will be his destiny as a Laker. If it is his destiny to remain a Laker. He's hoping to, preferring the victories and playing in his hometown over the possibility of at least double the minutes elsewhere.
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SPORTS
May 8, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
As the NBA playoffs return to the Great Western Forum tonight, a tad more muddled than when they departed 11 days ago, one notion has become clear. For the Lakers to continually play well as one team, they must continually remember they are two. There is Shaquille O'Neal, at this minute the league's most valuable player. Then there is everyone else. "My guys," he calls them. The most important guys.
SPORTS
May 7, 1998 | J.A. ADANDE
More than five minutes remained in Game 2 on Wednesday night and the Seattle fans were heading up the KeyArena aisles in such great numbers it was as if they'd heard there were half-priced double lattes at the concession stands. Giving up so soon, SuperSonics fans? They shouldn't. And you shouldn't count them out yet either, Laker lovers, even after that convincing 92-68 victory that evened the best-of-seven series at one game apiece. These are the SuperSonics, this is what they do.
SPORTS
May 7, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
This is why, prepared to bury the Lakers, your heart screaming for their heads, you wait. You always wait. You wait one more play. One more quarter. One more game. You wait because you know that on the other side of darkness, there could always be wondrous nights like Wednesday's. One whisker from facing third down and impossible, the most talented and tormented team in basketball sneaked up on a hostile room and did what it does best.
SPORTS
May 7, 1998 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Karl, the apron he brought to KeyArena having remained in the garment bag, was forced to endure this one without benefit of a cover, not even for his eyes. His running banter with Shaquille O'Neal was replaced Wednesday night by an actual feud against all the Lakers, who crushed Karl's Seattle SuperSonics, 92-68, to tie the Western Conference semifinals at 1-1 and take homecourt advantage as the best-of-seven series moves to the Great Western Forum for games Friday and Sunday.
SPORTS
May 7, 1998 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER
Eddie Jones accomplished one of his season-long goals, and the Lakers gained what they felt was a long-overdue measure of respect, as the NBA on Wednesday announced the all-defensive teams. Jones got the fourth-most votes at guard in balloting among head coaches, earning a spot on the second team with Mookie Blaylock as Michael Jordan and Gary Payton were again the top vote getters in the backcourt.
SPORTS
May 6, 1998 | J.A. ADANDE
Three-point shots are supposed to be the weapon of choice for the scrappy little team hoping to pull an upset, a slingshot to fell Goliath on the way to an NCAA championship. A team with serious intentions of winning an NBA title does not pursue it by relying on such a finicky gimmick. Only a team as crazy as the Seattle SuperSonics, who feature a point guard who posts up and a center who shoots three-point shots, would dare think about it. Only the SuperSonics could get away with it.
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