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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1992 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Gerard Schwarz doesn't exactly set the place on fire. Trouble is, much of the music he conducts is supposed to. After Friday night's Seattle Symphony concert at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, one got the idea that Schwarz might make "The Rite of Spring" sound sane and luxuriant. It's not that the much-admired 45-year-old conductor lacks enthusiasm or commitment or ideas. His interpretations Friday were carefully crafted, well played and never--well, almost never--dull.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Pity the middle-aged. Youth and longevity conspire to steal our attention, especially when both are present. This weekend a Simone and a Simon, separated by 75 years, will perform at concerts, separated by a few miles and less than 24 hours apart.  On Saturday, Simone Porter, a 17-year-old violin prodigy studying at the Colburn School, will make her debut with the Pasadena Symphony as soloist in Bruch's Violin Concerto. Also making his Pasadena debut is conductor Andrew Grams, music director of the Elgin Symphony in Illinois.  Porter, who hails from Seattle and whose professional debut with the Seattle Symphony was seven years ago when she was 10, will then, with remarkable speed, go on to make more SoCal debuts as soloist with the Pacific Symphony next month and, this summer, with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1988 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Gerard Schwarz has always tended to think big. When he was music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, from 1978 to 1986, he constantly stretched the repertory in the direction of symphonic grandeur. Now, as conductor of the Seattle Symphony, he has acquired a legitimate outlet for his heroic inclinations, and he seems to be basking in the luxury.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
A little good news from Seattle. The Seattle Symphony, Seattle Opera and the union representing those musicians (the SSOPO) have agreed to extend their collective bargaining agreement through Jan. 31, 2013, allowing more time to work out a new contract. Talks have been going on since the summer. David Sabee, acting chair of the SSOPO, said in a statement Monday that he was optimistic that a new pact could be reached without interrupting any scheduled concerts. Over the weekend, he said, the symphony musicians performed Beethoven's “Fidelio” and Gabriel Prokofiev's “Concerto for Turntable and Orchestra.” "The Seattle Symphony is now playing on a national stage,” Sabee wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Milton Katims, the music conductor who transformed the Seattle Symphony Orchestra from a part-time symphony with a mix of amateur and professional musicians into a respected regional orchestra, died Monday. He was 96. Katims, who was also an accomplished violist, died at Richmond Beach Rehabilitation Center in Shoreline, a suburb of Seattle, his daughter Pamela Katims Steele said. The cause was heart failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1989 | HERBERT GLASS
As the old, established American symphony orchestras become increasingly intent on pricing themselves out of the recording market, a few of what were once considered provincial orchestras are being actively courted. Not by the old, established labels but by the nouveau likes of Los Angeles-based Delos, whose existence is centered on the Seattle Symphony Orchestra under music director Gerard Schwarz.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Once stationed at Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Gerard Schwarz is piling on the years with the Seattle Symphony as the longest-serving music director (since 1985) of any major U.S. orchestra. He has put the ensemble in the national spotlight much the way he did LACO -- via recordings, lots of them, often swimming against the current by championing American composers who were out of fashion and needed advocacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
More musicians are in the midst of a labor dispute and a strike is threatened, this time in Seattle. The union that represents the musicians of the Seattle Symphony and Seattle Opera is playing hardball after the management of both groups proposed on Oct. 10 that the musicians  take a 15% reduction in overall compensation for the 2012-13 season.  The Seattle Symphony and Opera Players' Organization on Monday approved a “strike authorization” for...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
A little good news from Seattle. The Seattle Symphony, Seattle Opera and the union representing those musicians (the SSOPO) have agreed to extend their collective bargaining agreement through Jan. 31, 2013, allowing more time to work out a new contract. Talks have been going on since the summer. David Sabee, acting chair of the SSOPO, said in a statement Monday that he was optimistic that a new pact could be reached without interrupting any scheduled concerts. Over the weekend, he said, the symphony musicians performed Beethoven's “Fidelio” and Gabriel Prokofiev's “Concerto for Turntable and Orchestra.” "The Seattle Symphony is now playing on a national stage,” Sabee wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
More musicians are in the midst of a labor dispute and a strike is threatened, this time in Seattle. The union that represents the musicians of the Seattle Symphony and Seattle Opera is playing hardball after the management of both groups proposed on Oct. 10 that the musicians  take a 15% reduction in overall compensation for the 2012-13 season.  The Seattle Symphony and Opera Players' Organization on Monday approved a “strike authorization” for...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Once stationed at Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Gerard Schwarz is piling on the years with the Seattle Symphony as the longest-serving music director (since 1985) of any major U.S. orchestra. He has put the ensemble in the national spotlight much the way he did LACO -- via recordings, lots of them, often swimming against the current by championing American composers who were out of fashion and needed advocacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Milton Katims, the music conductor who transformed the Seattle Symphony Orchestra from a part-time symphony with a mix of amateur and professional musicians into a respected regional orchestra, died Monday. He was 96. Katims, who was also an accomplished violist, died at Richmond Beach Rehabilitation Center in Shoreline, a suburb of Seattle, his daughter Pamela Katims Steele said. The cause was heart failure.
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
Paul Meecham, general manager of the New York Philharmonic, has been chosen to succeed Deborah Card as executive director of the Seattle Symphony, causing some discord among musicians. Patricia Isacson Sabee has been interim director since Card left last summer to take the top administrative post at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Priscilla "Patsy" Bullitt Collins, a conservationist and philanthropist, died Wednesday at her Seattle home after a long battle with lung cancer. She was 82. A descendant of Seattle pioneers, Collins was the middle child of Dorothy and Scott Bullitt. Dorothy Bullitt founded King Broadcasting, which was sold in 1991 for about $300 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
A new concert hall is always exciting. Colorful banners dot the landscape. Shop windows, from dry cleaners to department stores, display symphony themes. Newspapers publish special supplements. Politicians jump on the arts bandwagon. Socialites go into high party gear. A city beams with pride. Saturday it was Seattle's turn, and this contented, famously livable, latte-driven town seemed entirely prepared for nothing less than greatness with the opening of Benaroya Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Seattle Symphony is on its way to becoming the first major American orchestra to secede from the American Federation of Musicians--which represents most working musicians in the United States. A majority of the 90-member orchestra recently voted to leave the 200,000-member federation and join a newly established collective bargaining group located in Seattle--the International Guild of Symphony, Opera and Ballet Musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a pure concept, the idea of building a first-class symphony hall on top of a train tunnel and a bus transit line, and at one of the busiest downtown intersections, makes sense only if you like the rumbling of the Burlington Northern underneath the bass line, with honking taxis on top of the horns. Then again, what an intersection! Right across the street from the Seattle Art Museum, with a view down to the ferries on Elliott Bay.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1995 | Daniel Cariaga
The Seattle Symphony will move into a new, $109-million, 2,500-seat downtown auditorium, to be called Benaroya Hall, in the fall of 1998. This will be the first move in 33 years for the 92-year-old orchestra, led for the past decade by Music Director Gerard Schwarz, and resident since 1962 in the Opera House built for the World's Fair of that year.
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