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NEWS
January 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Newspaper workers began voting on a contract offer from the Seattle Times that could end their 48-day-old strike. Union leaders recommended that their members vote in favor of the settlement reached last week, saying it wasn't everything they wanted but was the best they could do. The pact offers $3.30 an hour in raises over its six-year span. Members of the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild, which represents about 870 workers at the state's largest daily, had until 5 p.m. today to vote.
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NATIONAL
April 17, 2007 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
This city will remain a two-newspaper town -- for now -- under a deal reached Monday by the Blethen family, which controls the Seattle Times, and the Hearst Corp., publishers of the smaller Seattle Post-Intelligencer. But even as Times publisher Frank Blethen announced a settlement in a bitter 4-year-old legal dispute over the papers' joint operating agreement, he said he doubted the deal would be a permanent solution to keep both papers operating.
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NEWS
January 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Seattle Times workers have voted to end their seven-week strike. Editorial, advertising and circulation workers of the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild voted to approve the latest contract proposal, a spokesman said. It includes raises of $3.30 an hour over six years and guarantees that all workers laid off as a result of the strike can return to work within six months. Striking Seattle Post-Intelligencer employees approved their contract offer and returned to work Jan. 2.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2003 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
This city for now will continue to be a two-newspaper town. A Superior Court judge ruled Thursday that the Seattle Times could not use financial losses in 2000, brought on by a 49-day strike, to dissolve its business relationship with its cross-town rival, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Striking workers at the Seattle Times rejected the newspaper's latest contract offer, saying they weren't willing to accept layoffs that could last as long as a year. The vote, coming in the sixth week of the strike, was 348 to 87, according to the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild. Union leaders had recommended that their members reject the offer. Employees at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, who also went on strike Nov. 21, voted Thursday to accept their paper's contract proposal.
NEWS
December 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Union leaders are recommending that employees of the Seattle Times reject a contract offer intended to settle a strike that began more than five weeks ago. Meanwhile, employees of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer agreed to return to work next week after approving their contract. Back-to-work details for Times employees remained among the biggest sticking points in ending the strike by the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild, said Ron Judd, a union spokesman. Times President H.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, one of the city's two strike-hit newspapers, ended a 38-day strike by approving a new contract, but wrangling over who could return to work, and when, threatened resolution of the walkout at the Seattle Times. The P-I contract offers a smaller hourly wage increase than the guild had wanted but increases company contributions to health plans. The hang-up at the Times is over back-to-work provisions.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2003 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
This city for now will continue to be a two-newspaper town. A Superior Court judge ruled Thursday that the Seattle Times could not use financial losses in 2000, brought on by a 49-day strike, to dissolve its business relationship with its cross-town rival, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, editors at the Seattle Times were instituting a "pay-for-performance" salary system when they discovered what they thought was a troubling disparity--many minority staffers generally appeared to be paid less than their white colleagues. Most editors--most executives in any business--would probably have concealed that data or, perhaps, tried to quietly correct the situation.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A top Nordstrom Inc. executive called a Seattle newspaper's coverage of the retailer's labor problems "horrible," but he said the company's decision to cut advertising in the paper wasn't meant as retaliation. Co-chairman Jim Nordstrom said the company was only taking a closer look at the effectiveness of its advertising. Nordstrom spokeswoman Megan McKenzie said the company told The Seattle Times and Seattle Post-Intelligencer on Friday that it was cutting back on its ads.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Seattle Times workers have voted to end their seven-week strike. Editorial, advertising and circulation workers of the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild voted to approve the latest contract proposal, a spokesman said. It includes raises of $3.30 an hour over six years and guarantees that all workers laid off as a result of the strike can return to work within six months. Striking Seattle Post-Intelligencer employees approved their contract offer and returned to work Jan. 2.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Newspaper workers began voting on a contract offer from the Seattle Times that could end their 48-day-old strike. Union leaders recommended that their members vote in favor of the settlement reached last week, saying it wasn't everything they wanted but was the best they could do. The pact offers $3.30 an hour in raises over its six-year span. Members of the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild, which represents about 870 workers at the state's largest daily, had until 5 p.m. today to vote.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Striking workers at the Seattle Times rejected the newspaper's latest contract offer, saying they weren't willing to accept layoffs that could last as long as a year. The vote, coming in the sixth week of the strike, was 348 to 87, according to the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild. Union leaders had recommended that their members reject the offer. Employees at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, who also went on strike Nov. 21, voted Thursday to accept their paper's contract proposal.
NEWS
December 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Union leaders are recommending that employees of the Seattle Times reject a contract offer intended to settle a strike that began more than five weeks ago. Meanwhile, employees of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer agreed to return to work next week after approving their contract. Back-to-work details for Times employees remained among the biggest sticking points in ending the strike by the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Guild, said Ron Judd, a union spokesman. Times President H.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, one of the city's two strike-hit newspapers, ended a 38-day strike by approving a new contract, but wrangling over who could return to work, and when, threatened resolution of the walkout at the Seattle Times. The P-I contract offers a smaller hourly wage increase than the guild had wanted but increases company contributions to health plans. The hang-up at the Times is over back-to-work provisions.
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New Orleans Times-Picayune, which had never before won a Pulitzer Prize, won two on Monday, including the most prestigious, the gold medal for public service, for a series of articles examining threats to the world's supply of fish. Walt Handelsman of the Times-Picayune won a Pulitzer for editorial cartooning. The Seattle Times also won two Pulitzers.
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New Orleans Times-Picayune, which had never before won a Pulitzer Prize, won two on Monday, including the most prestigious, the gold medal for public service, for a series of articles examining threats to the world's supply of fish. Walt Handelsman of the Times-Picayune won a Pulitzer for editorial cartooning. The Seattle Times also won two Pulitzers.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2007 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
This city will remain a two-newspaper town -- for now -- under a deal reached Monday by the Blethen family, which controls the Seattle Times, and the Hearst Corp., publishers of the smaller Seattle Post-Intelligencer. But even as Times publisher Frank Blethen announced a settlement in a bitter 4-year-old legal dispute over the papers' joint operating agreement, he said he doubted the deal would be a permanent solution to keep both papers operating.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, editors at the Seattle Times were instituting a "pay-for-performance" salary system when they discovered what they thought was a troubling disparity--many minority staffers generally appeared to be paid less than their white colleagues. Most editors--most executives in any business--would probably have concealed that data or, perhaps, tried to quietly correct the situation.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A top Nordstrom Inc. executive called a Seattle newspaper's coverage of the retailer's labor problems "horrible," but he said the company's decision to cut advertising in the paper wasn't meant as retaliation. Co-chairman Jim Nordstrom said the company was only taking a closer look at the effectiveness of its advertising. Nordstrom spokeswoman Megan McKenzie said the company told The Seattle Times and Seattle Post-Intelligencer on Friday that it was cutting back on its ads.
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