Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSeattle Wa
IN THE NEWS

Seattle Wa

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 4, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Since Google launched Photo Sphere late last year, numerous users have contributed panoramic photos to Google Maps. Photo Sphere is a special camera mode available on some Android smartphones that allows users to quickly and easily take 360-degree Street View-style images. The mode can be used in any part of the world, and if users choose to share their photo with Google Maps, the panorama will show up when others search Google Maps for that location -- even if it's one where Street View has not yet launched.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 4, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Since Google launched Photo Sphere late last year, numerous users have contributed panoramic photos to Google Maps. Photo Sphere is a special camera mode available on some Android smartphones that allows users to quickly and easily take 360-degree Street View-style images. The mode can be used in any part of the world, and if users choose to share their photo with Google Maps, the panorama will show up when others search Google Maps for that location -- even if it's one where Street View has not yet launched.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
October 29, 2006 | Eric Lucas, Special to The Times
IT'S housed in a 24-story building indistinguishable from dozens of other Condo Towers That Ate Seattle. But an elegant, soothing rain-forest ethos greets you when you enter Hotel 1000, the city's newest upscale property and one of its most distinctive. The lobby floor is leaf-patterned marble from Brazil; muted leaf, bark and wood colors repeat everywhere; and a subtle bamboo motif culminates in a floor-vase "bouquet" of 6-foot bamboo canes in each of the 120 guest rooms.
NATIONAL
December 31, 2007 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
It's the kind of house that a year or two ago would have been snapped up in days: a refurbished rambler in a woodsy residential neighborhood minutes from downtown. The asking price: $559,000. But after seven weeks, Kristen and Al Dittmaier have not received a single offer on their Wedgwood home. "I really believed there would be no problem selling," Kristen Dittmaier said. "But the whole feel of the market has changed. We might have to drop the price."
TRAVEL
November 19, 2000 | ROB McKEOWN, Rob McKeown is a writer based in Boston
It's 4:40 on a Sunday afternoon, and I'm grazing at Le Pichet, a French bistro, slathering pork rillettes--an unctuous French cousin of pa^te--on crusty bread and sipping an Alsatian Pinot Blanc. The bartender keeps me in sight as he readies for the dinner rush, his manager writing the evening specials on a chalkboard. Next I order a plate of chevre from the Loire Valley.
NEWS
December 4, 1999 | KIM MURPHY and NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Mike Miller and Sylver Pondolfino, the real work started months ago, long before the World Trade Organization talks opened this week. It started on the warehouse floor, on coffee breaks, at lunch. Did their fellow United Parcel Service workers know about how an American baby food company was undermining pro-breast-feeding laws in Guatemala, they wanted to know? The two Teamsters Union representatives found the baby food argument their easiest sell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2001 | MELANTHIA MITCHELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kakuta Hamisi knows the ivory container and the slim wooden earrings in the Seattle Art Museum's African collection came from his Kenyan homeland. But their history ends there. "I wish I could go back and find who those belong to: I'd give everything back," said Hamisi, who has spent the last two years helping the museum catalog some 2,000 Maasai objects--among them wigs, necklaces and household items--from southern Kenya and northern Tanzania.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | Associated Press
Critics of the besieged Seattle Police Department nearly upstaged a rally by supporters at a downtown park Saturday. The police are under fire for their handling of protests during the recent World Trade Organization meetings. "Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Police brutality has got to go!" demonstrators chanted as city and law enforcement officials took the podium to thank more than 400 citizens packed into Westlake Park.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1999 | Evelyn Iritani
The 133-member World Trade Organization will launch its next round of global trade negotiations Nov. 30 through Dec. 3 in Seattle. The home of Boeing Co. beat out San Diego, Honolulu and Dallas to host the WTO ministerial meeting, which is expected to draw between 5,000 and 7,000 trade officials, employees and journalists. Geneva-based WTO holds ministerial meetings annually but has not launched new trade talks since 1986, when the so-called Uruguay Round was started. U.S. Trade Rep.
NEWS
September 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Mayor Paul Schell, hoping to avoid being the first Seattle mayor voted out of office since 1956, trailed his top two rivals in early primary returns Tuesday. With about 22,000 absentee ballots counted, City Atty. Mark Sidran had garnered 38% of the vote, to County Councilman Greg Nickels' 25% and Schell's 22%. The absentee ballots that have been counted so far represented 7% of registered voters in the city, said election supervisor Julie Anne Kempf.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2007 | Stuart Glascock, Times Staff Writer
As has happened in other states, cash-strapped schools in Washington are dropping librarians to save money: This year, Federal Way cut 20 librarian positions. Spokane reduced 10 librarians to half-time. Darrington cut two librarians. A school in Marysville eliminated its half-time librarian. Libraries are open less, their programs minimized, jobs combined. In many cases, part- timers with little formal library training are replacing skilled veterans.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2007 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
America's mayors, responding to a growing sense of urgency over climate change, are rapidly stepping up programs to weatherize buildings, capture methane gas from landfills, switch municipal fleets to hybrids, promote mass transit and buy cleaner electricity. But changing the carbon footprint of their cities is turning out to be harder than they thought.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2007 | Lynn Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Just across the street from the historic produce stalls of Pike Place Market sits a gunmetal gray cylindrical pod with shiny silver doors, a structure that would look right at home on the bridge of the starship Enterprise. It is the public restroom of the future. But its heyday here may soon be in the past. After three years in operation, Seattle is considering pulling the plug on these space-age restrooms, which cost the city $6.6 million.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Amazon.com Inc. has started offering delivery of fresh produce in the Seattle area. Amazon Fresh offers next-day delivery of thousands of produce items, the Seattle-based company said on its website. Amazon in May 2006 began selling 15,000 nonperishable grocery items such as rice, diapers and detergent in bulk. Adding product categories such as jewelry and automotive parts allowed it to boost revenue by 26% last year.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2007 | Tomas Alex Tizon and Lynn Marshall, Times Staff Writers
Her struggle for composure lost, parent Kathleen Brose wept Thursday over the Supreme Court's decision Thursday vindicating her claim that the local school district's racial-diversity practices discriminated against her daughter. "I don't want any parent to go through what we went through," Brose told a group of reporters. "It shouldn't matter what color any kid is. Everyone should have access to great schools." After seven years of legal wrangling, Brose said, "I'm glad it's over."
NATIONAL
May 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Seattle hospital acknowledged breaking state law when doctors performed a hysterectomy on a severely developmentally disabled girl whose parents have pursued medical treatments to stunt her growth, making her easier to care for. Sterilization surgeries must not be performed on children without a court order, Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center said Tuesday after an investigation by Washington Protection and Advocacy System.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First there were the World Trade Organization protests. Then the ditching of the city's millennium celebration under terrorist threat. Then the Mardi Gras riots, an earthquake, a drought, a controversial police shooting. That took this city up through Tuesday, when Boeing Co. announced it was laying off as many as 30,000 aerospace workers--most of them in the Puget Sound area. It was election day, and Seattle voters gave Mayor Paul Schell the boot.
NATIONAL
June 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Seattle had a right to block off part of downtown when World Trade Organization protests turned violent in 1999, a federal appeals court panel ruled, but the city might have gone too far in targeting only anti-WTO protesters within the restricted zone. The ruling partially overturned a 2001 decision by U.S. District Judge Barbara Rothstein, and it means that some demonstrators can pursue a class-action claim that the city violated their constitutional rights.
TRAVEL
April 8, 2007 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
Celebrate the reopening and $85-million expansion of the Seattle Art Museum with a special lodging-and-tickets package at the nearby Mayflower Park Hotel. The museum, which is adding gallery space and increasing the size of its restaurant and store, has been closed for more than 16 months. It is scheduled to reopen May 5. The deal: $209 per room, per night, May 5 through June 30. Included are two tickets to the museum and valet parking.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2007 | Catharine Hamm
Sticker shock: I just booked a rental car from the airport in Seattle for July. Our $100 rental car will actually be $160 with taxes and fees. This is highly immoral and unethical. Unfortunately, I booked our air tickets before finding out. Otherwise, I would not be visiting Seattle. What can we do? -- Ken Gerken Thousand Oaks Answer: WWAGD? Al Gore would ditch the car, that's what he would do. And maybe you should too, even if it's only to save your pocketbook and not the planet.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|