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NEWS
March 24, 1987 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
By sunset, the down-and-outer was already settled into his usual spot under the antique iron pergola, his feet tucked into a drawstring plastic trash bag. Here, along Yesler Way--the nation's original "Skid Row"--it was the cocktail hour. The man on the bench drank his from a bottle in a paper sack; the well-heeled people strolling by would take theirs from handsome crystal in Pioneer Square's charmingly restored bistros a few dozen yards away.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1997 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Slouched in a squat cardboard armchair in his Santa Monica office, Frank Gehry is peering into his own future. Across the room, a colleague tapes sheet after sheet of gold paper onto an enormous, unwieldly model as the 68-year-old architect ponders his work. For Gehry, it is a familiar process. Despite the intrusion of ever-more sophisticated computer software, Gehry still shapes things with his hands. But if his methods are fixed, the work is not.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Minoru Arakawa went to New York 12 years ago to set up the U.S. headquarters for his father-in-law's booming video game business, folks in the great city of Gotham quickly welcomed him to urban hell. A parking garage locked up his car at 6 p.m. sharp one evening, and by morning someone had stolen it. He recalls having to dodge bricks thrown from windows as he walked down the street. No one would cash his company checks.
MAGAZINE
May 5, 1996 | Kim Murphy
It was a talent Norm Rice always had, the ability to talk like he had his head in a bucket of water. He could do a mean John F. Kennedy imitation. And the clincher, for the mayor of a city that fairly struts its environmental conscience, was when he told how the Seattle Mariners pick up trash tossed onto the field by New York fans and sort it for recycling. * Rice was named America's funniest mayor in an HBO-sponsored contest last year.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BILL DIETRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents of this city have finally found a group that irritates them more than the recent wave of immigrants from Southern California. New Yorkers. More specifically, a New York-based real estate firm called the Urban Group. Seattle has been shocked this winter to learn that local officials, starting in 1981, quietly sold or leased to the company 11 buildings making up 90% of the city's famed Pike Place Market.
MAGAZINE
May 5, 1996 | Kim Murphy
It was a talent Norm Rice always had, the ability to talk like he had his head in a bucket of water. He could do a mean John F. Kennedy imitation. And the clincher, for the mayor of a city that fairly struts its environmental conscience, was when he told how the Seattle Mariners pick up trash tossed onto the field by New York fans and sort it for recycling. * Rice was named America's funniest mayor in an HBO-sponsored contest last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1997 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Slouched in a squat cardboard armchair in his Santa Monica office, Frank Gehry is peering into his own future. Across the room, a colleague tapes sheet after sheet of gold paper onto an enormous, unwieldly model as the 68-year-old architect ponders his work. For Gehry, it is a familiar process. Despite the intrusion of ever-more sophisticated computer software, Gehry still shapes things with his hands. But if his methods are fixed, the work is not.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | ANN JAPENGA
Mt. Rainier wears a permanent skirt of smog. Developers are turning the Seattle suburbs into a replica of Orange County. And every time there's a multivehicle smashup on the Evergreen floating bridge, commuters trapped in their cars reach the same silent conclusion: It's the Californians! The natives have held their tongues about these matters until recently, because Seattle residents are famous for their good manners.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Minoru Arakawa went to New York 12 years ago to set up the U.S. headquarters for his father-in-law's booming video game business, folks in the great city of Gotham quickly welcomed him to urban hell. A parking garage locked up his car at 6 p.m. sharp one evening, and by morning someone had stolen it. He recalls having to dodge bricks thrown from windows as he walked down the street. No one would cash his company checks.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BILL DIETRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents of this city have finally found a group that irritates them more than the recent wave of immigrants from Southern California. New Yorkers. More specifically, a New York-based real estate firm called the Urban Group. Seattle has been shocked this winter to learn that local officials, starting in 1981, quietly sold or leased to the company 11 buildings making up 90% of the city's famed Pike Place Market.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | ANN JAPENGA
Mt. Rainier wears a permanent skirt of smog. Developers are turning the Seattle suburbs into a replica of Orange County. And every time there's a multivehicle smashup on the Evergreen floating bridge, commuters trapped in their cars reach the same silent conclusion: It's the Californians! The natives have held their tongues about these matters until recently, because Seattle residents are famous for their good manners.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
By sunset, the down-and-outer was already settled into his usual spot under the antique iron pergola, his feet tucked into a drawstring plastic trash bag. Here, along Yesler Way--the nation's original "Skid Row"--it was the cocktail hour. The man on the bench drank his from a bottle in a paper sack; the well-heeled people strolling by would take theirs from handsome crystal in Pioneer Square's charmingly restored bistros a few dozen yards away.
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