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NEWS
November 14, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An initiative asking the Seattle school board to halt busing of students to achieve racial balance was declared approved, by a margin of 50.4% to 49.6%, after absentee ballots were counted. The unofficial count in last Tuesday's election had it losing by 70 votes. The school board must vote on whether to implement the initiative. If it does, schools will receive about $4.5 million a year from sales taxes for "magnet" school programs designed to achieve voluntary integration.
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NEWS
May 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
Angered by state education plans, teachers in Seattle and three suburban districts staged a one-day walkout Tuesday, shutting classes for 70,000 students. "We're doing this because, every day, our students are being shortchanged," said John Dunn, president of the Seattle Education Assn., which represents 4,800 teachers and staff. The union said 5,000 teachers walked out to protest the amount of money set aside for education in state budget proposals.
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NEWS
March 6, 1995 | Associated Press
A bus drivers' strike had parents scrambling to figure out how to get their children to school today. Teamsters Local 763 voted Saturday to strike Laidlaw Transit Inc. The lack of a pension plan is the biggest issue. The walkout by about 300 drivers affects about 12,000 students. The district will issue bus tokens to middle- and high-school students but not to those in grade school because of safety concerns, spokeswoman Dorothy Dubia said.
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general arrives to review his troops, and they are giggling behind their fists. The corridors of power are lined with wall lockers, and John Stanford strides by like a stiff breeze, grabbing outstretched adolescent hands and stooping to pick up potato chip bags along the way. There's one question he has for many of these young soldiers: "Do you have a hall pass?" This is the retired major general, a friend of Colin L.
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general arrives to review his troops, and they are giggling behind their fists. The corridors of power are lined with wall lockers, and John Stanford strides by like a stiff breeze, grabbing outstretched adolescent hands and stooping to pick up potato chip bags along the way. There's one question he has for many of these young soldiers: "Do you have a hall pass?" This is the retired major general, a friend of Colin L.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
Angered by state education plans, teachers in Seattle and three suburban districts staged a one-day walkout Tuesday, shutting classes for 70,000 students. "We're doing this because, every day, our students are being shortchanged," said John Dunn, president of the Seattle Education Assn., which represents 4,800 teachers and staff. The union said 5,000 teachers walked out to protest the amount of money set aside for education in state budget proposals.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | BILL DIETRICH, Special to The Times
School officials have a name for the new racial busing plan that went into effect last month: controlled choice. Some unhappy parents have another name for it: controlled chaos. Either way, the attempt to revive a faltering 12-year effort at school racial integration is being quickly tested before facing a non-binding referendum of the electorate in November. Seattle is now the biggest school district in the nation to try controlled choice. The busing plan was first designed by Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | Associated Press
A bus drivers' strike had parents scrambling to figure out how to get their children to school today. Teamsters Local 763 voted Saturday to strike Laidlaw Transit Inc. The lack of a pension plan is the biggest issue. The walkout by about 300 drivers affects about 12,000 students. The district will issue bus tokens to middle- and high-school students but not to those in grade school because of safety concerns, spokeswoman Dorothy Dubia said.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An initiative asking the Seattle school board to halt busing of students to achieve racial balance was declared approved, by a margin of 50.4% to 49.6%, after absentee ballots were counted. The unofficial count in last Tuesday's election had it losing by 70 votes. The school board must vote on whether to implement the initiative. If it does, schools will receive about $4.5 million a year from sales taxes for "magnet" school programs designed to achieve voluntary integration.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | BILL DIETRICH, Special to The Times
School officials have a name for the new racial busing plan that went into effect last month: controlled choice. Some unhappy parents have another name for it: controlled chaos. Either way, the attempt to revive a faltering 12-year effort at school racial integration is being quickly tested before facing a non-binding referendum of the electorate in November. Seattle is now the biggest school district in the nation to try controlled choice. The busing plan was first designed by Cambridge, Mass.
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