Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSeattle Wa Transportation
IN THE NEWS

Seattle Wa Transportation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A punishing winter storm that clamped down on Seattle with a foot of snow and gale winds Tuesday and Wednesday stranded tens of thousands of people, closed schools for the holidays three days early and turned commutes into five- and 10-hour ordeals. The mayhem left some residents wondering where the pollsters are now to ask about the delights of America's "most livable city"? Measurable snow typically can be expected only once or twice a year in the Puget Sound region.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 8, 1994 | DEBORAH ASBRAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jay Costa points to a corner of his cubicle. "I used to have two huge cabinets, four drawers each," he says. "Now I just have this one little white one." The cabinets--crammed with paperwork essential to managing bus building contracts for Costa's employer, the King County Department of Metropolitan Services in Seattle--and four others that occupied his boss's office once formed an information traffic jam.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After this week, buses will begin disappearing from downtown Seattle. They're going underground. While other West Coast cities--San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland--may see their transit future in rail systems, Seattle has cast its lot with the bus.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the state's No. 1 tourist attraction and a vital highway link for 33,000 commuters a day--but the fanciful ferry boats of Washington are rolling under the crush-weight of their popularity. One hour? Three hours? Five hours? Those are the unpleasant waits that some visitors will have to endure this summer just to drive onto a ferry for a 20-minute, seven-mile crossing of Puget Sound and for the longer journey to the San Juan Islands northwest of Seattle.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1994 | DEBORAH ASBRAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jay Costa points to a corner of his cubicle. "I used to have two huge cabinets, four drawers each," he says. "Now I just have this one little white one." The cabinets--crammed with paperwork essential to managing bus building contracts for Costa's employer, the King County Department of Metropolitan Services in Seattle--and four others that occupied his boss's office once formed an information traffic jam.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the state's No. 1 tourist attraction and a vital highway link for 33,000 commuters a day--but the fanciful ferry boats of Washington are rolling under the crush-weight of their popularity. One hour? Three hours? Five hours? Those are the unpleasant waits that some visitors will have to endure this summer just to drive onto a ferry for a 20-minute, seven-mile crossing of Puget Sound and for the longer journey to the San Juan Islands northwest of Seattle.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sinking of a landmark floating bridge served as a costly and unsettling reminder that the ever-proud, water-loving city of Seattle exists at the end of a thin and perilous ribbon of transportation. The Thanksgiving weekend loss of great chunks of the 1.5-mile-long Mercer Island Floating Bridge also delivered an embarrassing black eye.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A punishing winter storm that clamped down on Seattle with a foot of snow and gale winds Tuesday and Wednesday stranded tens of thousands of people, closed schools for the holidays three days early and turned commutes into five- and 10-hour ordeals. The mayhem left some residents wondering where the pollsters are now to ask about the delights of America's "most livable city"? Measurable snow typically can be expected only once or twice a year in the Puget Sound region.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sinking of a landmark floating bridge served as a costly and unsettling reminder that the ever-proud, water-loving city of Seattle exists at the end of a thin and perilous ribbon of transportation. The Thanksgiving weekend loss of great chunks of the 1.5-mile-long Mercer Island Floating Bridge also delivered an embarrassing black eye.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After this week, buses will begin disappearing from downtown Seattle. They're going underground. While other West Coast cities--San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland--may see their transit future in rail systems, Seattle has cast its lot with the bus.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|