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Seaver Center For Western History Research

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 19th century Los Angeles, county officials had a simple way to discourage ballot fraud. Handwritten logs gave physical descriptions of voters that often included scars and deformities from the era's rough frontier work. Laborer and Irish immigrant Richard Dwyer, for example, was missing his left foot, according to an inky entry in the leather-bound 1896 registration book.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 19th century Los Angeles, county officials had a simple way to discourage ballot fraud. Handwritten logs gave physical descriptions of voters that often included scars and deformities from the era's rough frontier work. Laborer and Irish immigrant Richard Dwyer, for example, was missing his left foot, according to an inky entry in the leather-bound 1896 registration book.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
The Spanish and Mexican contribution to early Los Angeles is well documented in everything from place names to plazas. Far less well known is the part played by 19th century French immigrants, among them Henri Penelon, the city's first professional artist. In fact, among all Los Angeles' French pioneer families--Vignes, Sainsevain and Viole--none was better known at the time and more quickly forgotten than Penelon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In a unique, powerful and now forgotten protest of one of America's worst social injustices, Ralph Lazo, a Latino teenager, joined his Japanese American friends from Bunker Hill when they were interned during World War II. When his friends and their families were ordered to Manzanar, an internment camp in the desert, Lazo followed them. He was the only non-Japanese in any of the internment camps.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2001
The 32 libraries and special collections that contributed material to the exhibit "The World From Here" are open to the public, although some are by appointment only or require advance application from researchers. Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, Margaret Herrick Library, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 247-3020. Books, clippings, screenplays, posters and periodicals documenting the history of film as an art and industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Fewer polling places and myriad candidates await California voters in the gubernatorial recall election, but for all the obstacles, voting may be less complicated than it was 100 years ago. Then, the official system for identifying voters relied on a logbook of their descriptions and deformities.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | WILLIAM S. MURPHY, Murphy is a Times photographer. and
Literary and pictorial treasures that the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History has been acquiring since its founding in 1913 are now housed in a recently completed storage and library facility at the museum in Exposition Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2001 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At some point in most everyone's childhood, someone--your mother, your third-grade teacher--revealed the secrets of the library. Maybe, to instill a sense of wonder, she said libraries hold books full of great ideas, magical stories and far-off places. The code to finding them: the card catalog, the Dewey Decimal System.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The case of the "lost" Ansel Adams negatives that purportedly are worth $200 million has turned into a public argument between Rick Norsigian , who found them at a Fresno garage sale 10 years ago, and the great photographer's family and former associates and leading art-photography dealers, who deny that Adams took them. The brouhaha might have been avoided had Norsigian, a wall-painter for the Fresno school district, taken the advice years ago of Adams biographer Jonathan Spaulding.
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