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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
SAN FRANCISCO - An Asiana Airlines pilot told investigators that he noticed Flight 214 was coming in too low to San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, and tried to correct the plane's landing path just before it crashed, officials said Tuesday. When the plane was 500 feet above the runway, instructional pilot Lee Jung-min told pilot-in-training Lee Kang-kook to pull the plane up, National Transportation Safety Board Deborah A.P. Hersman said during a news conference. "They were trying to correct at that point," said Hersman, citing completed interviews with three of the four pilots.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- A martial arts academy owner and his family have described a long wait for medical help as they comforted four victims of Saturday's Asiana Airlines crash who were ejected from the rear of the craft after the tail sheared off. In an interview with NBC Bay Area, Elliott Stone, who runs Elite Martial Arts Academy in Scotts Valley near Santa Cruz said he was returning with his fiancee, brother and parents from a martial arts competition...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Faced with a race against time and tides, owners of a cluster of houses perched on a crumbling oceanfront bluff in Encinitas are expected to receive permission today from the state to take emergency steps to save their homes. Officials with the State Coastal Commission said they expect to grant the four homeowners in the 700 block of Neptune Avenue an emergency permit to build a seawall to help stabilize the bluff. "This is a painful situation for everyone involved," said Paul Webb, a coastal planner with the commission.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
This just in: Asiana Airlines Flight 214's pilots tell investigators that the plane's automatic throttle system failed to keep the doomed jetliner at the proper speed for landing. This also just in: In a historic first, the Navy's X-47B drone successfully takes off and lands on an aircraft carrier . Isn't technology great? Is this a wonderful age, or what? (For further proof, there's this: An Apple I computer, the first computer model sold by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in the 1970s -- original price $666 -- just sold for $387,750.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Broad Beach is home to the rich and famous, a secluded stretch of coastline where the houses seem to practically sit on the sea. But for those who don't live in the Malibu enclave, the public beach has been all but impossible to visit. For years, Broad Beach has been the epicenter of high-profile battles over public access, and now chains, locks and barricades that have blocked the only two entrances to the beach have revived that fight. The gates were locked last winter when residents got an emergency permit from the California Coastal Commission to build a 1.1-mile seawall to protect their multimillion-dollar homes from the advancing ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1985 | LIZ MULLEN \f7
The California Coastal Commission on Wednesday is expected to require that the Blue Lagoon Community Assn. allow public access to the beach at the site of Blue Lagoon's seawall. The association is asking the commission for a permanent permit for the 2,500-ton rock seawall the homeowners' group fortified in November, 1983.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1988
I am always amused by the idiocy of people who think they are stronger than the forces of nature. The outcome, of course, is predictable. So that second home owners, real estate developers and hotel operators can build along the shoreline, the public must suffer the costs. And just what are those costs? In Suffolk County, N.Y., it is $120 million. In Carolina and Kure Beach, S.C., it is $24 million. The list goes on. And, what for? To "stabilize" the beach! Any fool who has spent 30 seconds watching the waves move sand around the beach knows there is no seawall or structure that will hold back the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1995
In response to recent publicity about the dredging needed in Channel Islands Marina, I would like to say that although the situation at the corner of Victoria Avenue and Channel Islands Boulevard is very real, it is also very limited. Both the cities of Port Hueneme and Oxnard have storm drains that dump silt and trash into the water at the location. The problem is particularly bad now because of this year's heavy rainfall. The problem needs a preventive solution for the future because federal regulations have made dredging an expensive and slow process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SOLANA BEACH, Calif. - As befits its name, issues of sand and surf loom large in this seaside community north of San Diego. For more than three decades, controversy has surrounded the proliferation of privately built sea walls meant to protect bluff-top homeowners along the city's approximately 1.7 miles of oceanfront. Property owners say the walls are the only way to keep the pounding waves from inexorably undercutting the tall bluffs and imperiling their pricey homes. Environmentalists view the sea walls - built on public and private property - as abominations that shrink the beach and place private interests above the right of the public to enjoy the coast.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
This just in: Asiana Airlines Flight 214's pilots tell investigators that the plane's automatic throttle system failed to keep the doomed jetliner at the proper speed for landing. This also just in: In a historic first, the Navy's X-47B drone successfully takes off and lands on an aircraft carrier . Isn't technology great? Is this a wonderful age, or what? (For further proof, there's this: An Apple I computer, the first computer model sold by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in the 1970s -- original price $666 -- just sold for $387,750.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
SAN FRANCISCO - An Asiana Airlines pilot told investigators that he noticed Flight 214 was coming in too low to San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, and tried to correct the plane's landing path just before it crashed, officials said Tuesday. When the plane was 500 feet above the runway, instructional pilot Lee Jung-min told pilot-in-training Lee Kang-kook to pull the plane up, National Transportation Safety Board Deborah A.P. Hersman said during a news conference. "They were trying to correct at that point," said Hersman, citing completed interviews with three of the four pilots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SOLANA BEACH, Calif. - As befits its name, issues of sand and surf loom large in this seaside community north of San Diego. For more than three decades, controversy has surrounded the proliferation of privately built sea walls meant to protect bluff-top homeowners along the city's approximately 1.7 miles of oceanfront. Property owners say the walls are the only way to keep the pounding waves from inexorably undercutting the tall bluffs and imperiling their pricey homes. Environmentalists view the sea walls - built on public and private property - as abominations that shrink the beach and place private interests above the right of the public to enjoy the coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2011 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
As people stroll Balboa Island's picturesque waterfront, some wonder how much one of those cozy cottages costs. City officials think about another price tag: how much it will take to defend those homes against rising sea levels. City engineers revealed last month that it could cost about $60 million to replace Balboa Island's aging seawalls; otherwise, residents could risk more high tides washing into their streets and homes. The island, 4 to 8 feet above sea level, represents only a small portion of coastal communities' looming problems from climate change.
TRAVEL
March 8, 2011 | By John Henderson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'm walking along a stretch of the Adriatic Sea that reminds me of another time, another hemisphere. It's not the forest of pine trees that offers shade along the seawall on a poster-perfect 70-degree day. It's not the little docked boats bobbing up and down or the donkey braying in the distance, competing with birds for the lone sound in the air. No, it's the water. At this spot on the Adriatic, where the sea starts to run out of room and the curvature of Eastern and Central Europe begins, it's turquoise, more brilliant than the cloudless sky above.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Cities along California's coastline that for years have dismissed reports of climate change or lagged in preparing for rising sea levels are now making plans to fortify their beaches, harbors and waterfronts. Communities up and down the coast have begun drafting plans to build up wetlands as buffers against rising tides, to construct levees and seawalls to keep the waters at bay or to retreat from the shoreline by moving structures inland. Among them is Newport Beach, a politically conservative city where a council member once professed to not believe in global warming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Broad Beach is home to the rich and famous, a secluded stretch of coastline where the houses seem to practically sit on the sea. But for those who don't live in the Malibu enclave, the public beach has been all but impossible to visit. For years, Broad Beach has been the epicenter of high-profile battles over public access, and now chains, locks and barricades that have blocked the only two entrances to the beach have revived that fight. The gates were locked last winter when residents got an emergency permit from the California Coastal Commission to build a 1.1-mile seawall to protect their multimillion-dollar homes from the advancing ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1987
Fletcher Cove became the official name of the controversial "Pillbox Beach" on Monday by a 3-1 vote of the Solana Beach City Council despite opposition by Councilman Richard Hendlin. Hendlin said the beach's new name, which will be posted on a sign, was inappropriate because Ed Fletcher, the man who formerly owned the land surrounding the beach and cleared bluffs to make it accessible to the public, had placed conditions on his property in 1928 that it not be sold or leased to non-whites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- A martial arts academy owner and his family have described a long wait for medical help as they comforted four victims of Saturday's Asiana Airlines crash who were ejected from the rear of the craft after the tail sheared off. In an interview with NBC Bay Area, Elliott Stone, who runs Elite Martial Arts Academy in Scotts Valley near Santa Cruz said he was returning with his fiancee, brother and parents from a martial arts competition...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
The gradual erosion of Southern California's majestic coastal bluffs contribute a far greater amount of beach sand than previously thought, according to a university study that may arm environmentalists with a weapon in fighting oceanfront development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
City officials are asking the California Coastal Commission for permission to make permanent last winter's emergency seawall repairs. There was extensive damage to the seawalls in January and February, according to public works director Jim Cullem. Waves dislodged some stones, damaged several vertical walls and exposed foundations that had been undermined during storms in 1995 and 1998, he said.
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