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OPINION
April 9, 2003
Re "Desalination Seen as a Solution to Water Shortage," April 6: Let me see if I have this straight. "The Simi Valley brine line will take the salt extracted from ground water and creek water and dump it into the Pacific Ocean or coastal wetlands." Brine generally runs to 70 parts per thousand dissolved salt. That is nearly three times saltier than seawater. Isn't anyone asking questions about what that brine is going to do to wetlands life and habitat? What about the effect on marine life at the ocean outfall?
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OPINION
February 7, 2014 | By David Helvarg
Californians used to call it earthquake weather, the unseasonably warm, dry, blue-sky days that pushed deep into this year's rainy season. Now we just call it drought. Unfortunately, the state's water resources are at critically low levels (12% of normal Sierra Nevada snowpack for this time of year) and the crisis is unlikely to go away soon or for long. A report by the U.S. Geological Survey predicts that with changing patterns of rain and snow we will see more frequent and intense droughts and flash flooding in California's future.
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WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Radiation has been detected in seawater in areas surrounding the earthquake and tsunami-ravaged Fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern Japan, creating one more cause for concern after radiation was found in food items and tap water. Officials stressed that the levels -- which they said would have minuscule impact on the human body even if the seawater were ingested daily over a year -- were not cause for alarm. Tokyo Electric Power Company, which owns the plant, said it detected radioactive iodine-131 more than 125 times higher than the legal limit in a sample of ocean water found about 0.2 miles south of the Fukushima Daiichi plant on Monday, Kyodo News Agency reported.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Ocean acidification could alter the behavior of fish and make them more anxious, a new study says. The finding came in an experiment by researchers interested in the neurological effects of the shift in the chemistry of seawater that is happening as the ocean takes up carbon dioxide that has built up in the Earth's atmosphere from human activity. In a laboratory, scientists put one group of young rockfish , a common species along the California coast, in normal seawater and put another group of the fish in water with the lower pH the ocean is predicted to reach in about 100 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt
The State Water Resources Control Board unanimously approved a resolution Tuesday to spend roughly $2 million over the next two fiscal years to test ocean water for harmful bacteria. The action was taken at Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's request after he eliminated state funding for the program in his September budget cuts. Without the money, some coastal counties would have had to reduce or halt analysis of seawater to ensure its safety for beachgoers. -- Susannah Rosenblatt
SCIENCE
March 13, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Japanese officials have begun pumping seawater into a second nuclear reactor at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant 140 miles north of Tokyo to cool the reactor core in a last-ditch effort to stave off a core meltdown. The action indicates that the reactor's normal backup cooling system has failed and is no longer able to supply fresh water to the core. Officials at Tokyo Electric Power Co., which owns the plant, have been struggling to keep six shut-down nuclear reactors cooled because seawater from the tsunami that followed Friday's magnitude 9.0 earthquake damaged the diesel generators that power the circulating pumps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2006 | By Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
As she stared down into a wide-mouthed plastic jar aboard the R/V Discoverer, Victoria Fabry peered into the future. The marine snails she was studying - graceful creatures with wing-like feet that help them glide through the water - had started to dissolve. Fabry was taken aback. The button-sized snails, called pteropods, are hardy animals that swirl in dense patches in some of the world's coldest seas. In 20 years of studying the snails, a vital ingredient in the polar food supply, the marine biologist from Cal State San Marcos had never seen such damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
A proposed seawater desalination plant in Huntington Beach could significantly harm parts of the Southern California ocean environment unless substantial changes are made in its design and operation, according to the staff of the state Coastal Commission. A staff report prepared for this week's commission vote on the project highlights the potential downside of large-scale efforts to turn the salty water of the Pacific Ocean into drinking supplies for coastal California. "There are ways to do desal in a fairly environmentally benign way," said Tom Luster, an environmental scientist with the commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
The city of Los Angeles has launched an aggressive lobbying campaign to roll back tough new state regulations meant to limit the environmental damage that power plants inflict on the oceans. Officials are pushing a last-minute bill in the Legislature that would delay by up to 11 years a new state mandate requiring that the city's municipal utility overhaul three coastal power plants to reduce their use of seawater for cooling. The current deadlines for meeting the seawater restrictions would cost $2.3 billion more than city officials planned because it would force them to modernize power plants ahead of schedule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000
Re: "Consultants to Try Cleaning Up Most Polluted Beach," July 9. I suggest adding enough clean material--in this case, seawater--to the polluted area (Kiddie Beach) until "safe" designated levels are reached and maintained. Radical as it may seem, large pumps could be brought in to supply millions of gallons of relatively clean seawater to this lagoon--hence, the dilution solution. If it works, kids will again be able to use the beach, which is the main goal isn't it? MATT LANDRY Oak Park
SCIENCE
November 22, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
At a recent state Coastal Commission hearing on a proposed seawater desalination plant in Huntington Beach, the debate was not about the merits of using the Pacific Ocean as a water source. A parade of local elected officials and representatives of Orange County congressmen urged approval of the project last week, saying it could play an important role in diversifying Southern California's water supply. Even most opponents of Poseidon Resources' proposal said they were not opposed to any desalination on the California coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
A proposed seawater desalination plant in Huntington Beach could significantly harm parts of the Southern California ocean environment unless substantial changes are made in its design and operation, according to the staff of the state Coastal Commission. A staff report prepared for this week's commission vote on the project highlights the potential downside of large-scale efforts to turn the salty water of the Pacific Ocean into drinking supplies for coastal California. "There are ways to do desal in a fairly environmentally benign way," said Tom Luster, an environmental scientist with the commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
CARLSBAD, Calif. - Dreamers have long looked to the Pacific Ocean as the ultimate answer to California's water needs: an inexhaustible, drought-proof reservoir in the state's backyard. In the last decade, proposals for about 20 desalting plants have been discussed up and down the coast. But even with construction about to begin on the nation's largest seawater desalination facility, 35 miles north of San Diego, experts say it is doubtful that dream will ever be fully realized. "While this Poseidon adventure may work out, I don't look for a lot of that," said Henry Vaux Jr., a UC Berkeley professor emeritus of resource economics who contributed to a 2008 National Research Council report on desalination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Strange, jellyfish-like creatures swarming a coastal nuclear power plant: It might sound like the premise of a cult horror flick, but the invasion has prompted officials at the Diablo Canyon facility in San Luis Obispo to curtail operations for at least a few days. The plant's operator, Pacific Gas & Electric, cut power generation from one of the plant's two reactors to 25% of its capacity, spokesman Tom Cuddy said Wednesday. The other reactor was shut down this week for what PG&E described as routine refueling and maintenance, a procedure that could take about a month.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2011 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Earl Billiot guides his boat down a quiet bayou and explains how it used to be, when the water that runs as wide as a two-lane highway was so narrow you could reach out and touch the land. Branches heavy with Spanish moss draped over the bayou, and forests covered marshes that are bare now except for the skeletons of dead cypress trees. Eighty miles away, tourists and locals gather atop a levee in New Orleans to gape at the magnificent Mississippi River, swollen by floods and higher than most have ever seen it. They relax in the afternoon sun with plastic cups of daiquiris and beer, certain that the structure they sit on will keep the water back.
WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Radiation has been detected in seawater in areas surrounding the earthquake and tsunami-ravaged Fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern Japan, creating one more cause for concern after radiation was found in food items and tap water. Officials stressed that the levels -- which they said would have minuscule impact on the human body even if the seawater were ingested daily over a year -- were not cause for alarm. Tokyo Electric Power Company, which owns the plant, said it detected radioactive iodine-131 more than 125 times higher than the legal limit in a sample of ocean water found about 0.2 miles south of the Fukushima Daiichi plant on Monday, Kyodo News Agency reported.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Ocean acidification could alter the behavior of fish and make them more anxious, a new study says. The finding came in an experiment by researchers interested in the neurological effects of the shift in the chemistry of seawater that is happening as the ocean takes up carbon dioxide that has built up in the Earth's atmosphere from human activity. In a laboratory, scientists put one group of young rockfish , a common species along the California coast, in normal seawater and put another group of the fish in water with the lower pH the ocean is predicted to reach in about 100 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1987 | HECTOR GUTIERREZ, Times Staff Writer
Ground was broken Thursday on a $3.95-million pier that will replace the deteriorating and storm-beaten Scripps Pier. About 65 descendants of the Scripps family, joined by officials from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, local and state government officials, watched Ellen Revelle, the grandniece of Ellen Browning Scripps, use a gold oceanographic coring device in the official ground-breaking ceremony on the beach in La Jolla.
SCIENCE
March 19, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Working overnight into Sunday, engineers have successfully restored power to cooling pumps in two reactors at the disabled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the first genuinely hopeful sign in the week-long battle to prevent a full-scale meltdown at any of the six reactors at the site. Although power has so far been restored only at reactor buildings 5 and 6, which were not considered a particular threat, that success suggests that workers are finally beginning to make some headway in their effort to prevent more radiation from escaping the plant.
SCIENCE
March 18, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, W.J. Hennigan and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Workers struggling to contain radioactive releases from the Fukushima power plant face two critical tasks to avoid turning a nuclear disaster into a catastrophe: preventing a runaway chain reaction into the nuclear fuel and maintaining a massive flow of seawater through the damaged pools and reactor vessels. There are few options, none of them good. "The most imaginative engineers in the world couldn't have dreamed up a situation like this," said Najmedin Meshkati, a USC professor and nuclear power expert.
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