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Seaweed

BUSINESS
September 9, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Filipinos call it a "wonder powder"--a seaweed derivative that's being used as a substitute for fat in meat. It also binds the substances in toothpaste and shampoos. It gives body to dairy products, puddings and pie fillings. And now, boosters say, it may do wonders for the faltering economy of the Philippines. Carrageenan, as the product is officially known, is suddenly hot because of McDonald's Corp.'
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BUSINESS
August 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
When Hardee's announced a low-fat hamburger, along with an advertising campaign, they implied there's something fishy in the McDonald's lean entry. The fast-food chain recently unwrapped its "Real Lean Deluxe," and the accompanying media campaign poured hot grease on a McDonald's hamburger that uses a seaweed filler called carageenan to help hold the burger together.
FOOD
December 27, 1990 | CAROLE SUGARMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The world is divided between those who like the taste of grease and those who don't. Rick Asper likes it. Sherman Buchanan doesn't. At a McDonald's wedged between an Econo Lodge and a Maple Donuts off Interstate 83, the two patrons are on opposite poles when it comes to the chain's new Lean Deluxe hamburger. Buchanan likes it. Asper doesn't.
FOOD
November 29, 1990 | TONI TIPTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You may not know it, but you probably eat a lot of seaweed. It's found in puddings, in many commercial yogurts and ice creams, and in steak sauce and salad dressings. According to McDonald's, seaweed is the secret ingredient in the Lean Deluxe, the low-fat new hamburger they've been testing. But some people actually eat seaweed that looks like seaweed. Health food store shelves are brimming with products made from seaweed.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | AURORA MACKEY ARMSTRONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's part of our heritage, part of our tradition, that we Americans all came from somewhere else. For most of us, the immigrant was a parent, or a grandparent or a long-ago forebear. American traditions were adopted without too much thought. If our parents served up turkey and pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving--the holiday in remembrance of an earlier generation of new, grateful immigrants--that is what we now give our own children.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When breakfast cereals were put on the market in Japan 27 years ago, Japanese preferred to start the day with seaweed, raw eggs, rice, fish and vegetables. The few customers who bought the products of the two pioneers--Kellogg and a Japanese company called Cisco--thought cereals were best suited as snacks for children. So did grocery stores, which displayed cereal in the candy and snack section. Worse yet, older people mistook it for bird food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two giant kelp forests off San Miguel Island in Channel Islands National Park--among the last that are relatively unaffected by humans--should be preserved as a marine study area, park scientists say. Moreover, the way the California Department of Fish and Game regulates the harvest of kelp beds and fishes there and throughout the state should be restructured so that state waters are managed by zones, rather than on a species-by-species basis, the scientists believe.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | ANTON FERREIRA, REUTERS
If anyone survives the greenhouse effect, it could be due to Israeli efforts to grow nuts and seaweed in the flinty wilderness of the Negev desert. Prof. Yossi Mizrahi has searched the world for fruit and nut trees that are tolerant to heat and salt water and is growing them on test farms in the Negev to see which could be used as food crops.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER
While Mendocino County's seaweed farmers wrung $73,000 in sales from the ocean in 1989, San Diego-based Kelco was harvesting millions of dollars in giant kelp. Kelco, a division of pharmaceuticals giant Merck & Co., is the largest company of its kind in the world. It has three 140- to 180-foot ships, kelp cutters that mow the tops off the fastest-growing and tallest plants in the ocean. This seaweed, however, isn't harvested to be eaten.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vegetable farmers John Lewallen and his wife, Eleanor, harvest their crops in the intertidal waters of the Pacific Ocean at a picturesque, remote cove studded with rock outcroppings. Their briny farm yields wild sea vegetables--seaweed--handpicked in hard-to-reach coves and bays along a 40-mile stretch of rugged Northern California coast.
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