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Seawolf Submarine

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NEWS
March 26, 1995 | Reuters
The Navy has awarded $99 million to General Dynamics' Electric Boat Division to buy parts for a controversial third Seawolf submarine. The submarine was originally designed for warfare with the former Soviet Union, and opponents say the third one should be killed as a relic of the Cold War that the United States can no longer afford. But the Clinton Administration has requested $1.
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NEWS
July 1, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Armed Services Committee voted Friday to give the Pentagon $7 billion more in spending authority than President Clinton had requested for the coming fiscal year but followed his recommendation to kill the controversial B-2 bomber program.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seawolf Contract Invalidation Is Appealed: The Justice Department is asking a federal appeals court in Richmond, Va., to overturn a ruling that threw out the awarding of the Navy's second Seawolf submarine contract to General Dynamics Corp. General Dynamics, which is building the first Seawolf, won the contract for the second submarine in May, beating out Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. U.S.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | Reuters
The Navy has awarded $99 million to General Dynamics' Electric Boat Division to buy parts for a controversial third Seawolf submarine. The submarine was originally designed for warfare with the former Soviet Union, and opponents say the third one should be killed as a relic of the Cold War that the United States can no longer afford. But the Clinton Administration has requested $1.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
UP PERISCOPE! General Dynamics Corp. is pulling out all stops in its campaign to save the $2 billion-a-copy Seawolf submarine. . . . It has hired the high-powered Washington PR firm Powell Tate and is relentlessly lobbying to keep the sub program alive. It brought executives from GD's Electric Boat Division, which builds the sub, to Washington for interviews and then trotted out former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Carlisle A. H. Trost. . . .
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
General Dynamics to Lay Off 4,000: General Dynamics said the first of up to 4,000 layoffs resulting from the cancellation of the Seawolf submarine program will begin this month at its Groton, Conn., plant. The firm's Electric Boat division said last month that it anticipated laying off 10,000 of its 17,000 Groton employees by 1997. The plant, Connecticut's second-largest private employer, relied largely on Navy submarine pacts.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
The House overwhelmingly approved legislation on Thursday that would trim $5.8 billion from this year's budget while preserving one of two planned Seawolf submarines that President Bush wants scrapped. The measure, approved on a 412-2 tally, could lead the way to a compromise between Bush and Congress in their fight over the sophisticated attack submarines. The Senate passed a bill Wednesday that would allow both craft to be built, prompting a veto threat from Bush.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Armed Services Committee voted Friday to give the Pentagon $7 billion more in spending authority than President Clinton had requested for the coming fiscal year but followed his recommendation to kill the controversial B-2 bomber program.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Wednesday unveiled a 1993 defense budget that scales back or cancels several weapon systems, including the B-2 bomber and the Seawolf submarine, while seeking more funds for development of "Star Wars" missile defenses and holding the line on personnel cuts. At the same time, Cheney warned that U.S.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Layoffs at General Dynamics: General Dynamics said it has given layoff notices to 1,888 employees of its Electric Boat Division due to the proposed cancellation of the Seawolf nuclear submarine program. The company had earlier announced plans to lay off about 2,200 of the division's 20,000 workers. The difference is due to attrition, said a spokesman.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
The House overwhelmingly approved legislation on Thursday that would trim $5.8 billion from this year's budget while preserving one of two planned Seawolf submarines that President Bush wants scrapped. The measure, approved on a 412-2 tally, could lead the way to a compromise between Bush and Congress in their fight over the sophisticated attack submarines. The Senate passed a bill Wednesday that would allow both craft to be built, prompting a veto threat from Bush.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
UP PERISCOPE! General Dynamics Corp. is pulling out all stops in its campaign to save the $2 billion-a-copy Seawolf submarine. . . . It has hired the high-powered Washington PR firm Powell Tate and is relentlessly lobbying to keep the sub program alive. It brought executives from GD's Electric Boat Division, which builds the sub, to Washington for interviews and then trotted out former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Carlisle A. H. Trost. . . .
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
General Dynamics to Lay Off 4,000: General Dynamics said the first of up to 4,000 layoffs resulting from the cancellation of the Seawolf submarine program will begin this month at its Groton, Conn., plant. The firm's Electric Boat division said last month that it anticipated laying off 10,000 of its 17,000 Groton employees by 1997. The plant, Connecticut's second-largest private employer, relied largely on Navy submarine pacts.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Wednesday unveiled a 1993 defense budget that scales back or cancels several weapon systems, including the B-2 bomber and the Seawolf submarine, while seeking more funds for development of "Star Wars" missile defenses and holding the line on personnel cuts. At the same time, Cheney warned that U.S.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seawolf Contract Invalidation Is Appealed: The Justice Department is asking a federal appeals court in Richmond, Va., to overturn a ruling that threw out the awarding of the Navy's second Seawolf submarine contract to General Dynamics Corp. General Dynamics, which is building the first Seawolf, won the contract for the second submarine in May, beating out Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. U.S.
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