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BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri
Shamu plans to soak Wall Street with a greater splash than previously thought. SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. - the company known for its performing killer whale - could raise $540 million in an initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange. That's $440 million more than its initial filing in December showed, and $40 million larger than a filing Monday. Now, the theme park company said it plans to offer 20 million shares priced between $24 and $27, according to a Tuesday filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
PARK CITY, Utah - It was Samantha Berg's dream job: swimming with orcas. But with only a bachelor's degree in animal science from Cornell University and no hands-on experience with whales, the then-22-year-old assumed she was not qualified to perform stunts in a SeaWorld pool with the powerful 8,000-pound animals. Still, she decided to send her résumé to marine parks nationwide in the hopes that she might land a low-level gig and learn more about sea life. To her surprise, she was called in for an audition at SeaWorld's Orlando park, which asked her to prove her physical acumen by diving 25 feet underwater, picking up a weight, returning to the surface, carrying heavy fish buckets and then jumping up on stage even as she was struggling for breath.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
There is something fishy about this IPO. SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. and its killer whales are going public, filing for an initial public offering that could raise $100 million. The theme park company, famous for using the orca Shamu as a performer, said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it hopes to trade under the ticker symbol SEAS. But it didn't say much else - not what exchange would host its stock, how many shares will be up for grabs, the expected share price or when they'll be offered.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. and its killer whales are going public, filing for an initial public offering that could raise $100 million. The theme park company, famous for using the orca Shamu as a performer, said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it hopes to trade under the SEAS ticker. But it didn't say much else - not what exchange will host its stock, or how many shares will be up for grabs, how those shares will be priced or when they'll be offered.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
After an incident in which an 8-year-old girl was bitten by a dolphin, officials at SeaWorld in Orlando said they responded quickly to treat Jillian Thomas of Georgia. "A member of our health services team ... quickly responded and treated the young girl," read a statement from the Florida theme park. Jillian's parents weren't quite so impressed with the park's reaction. They told KTLA-TV Channel 5 that there were no warnings of possible infection, no manager was sent over, and "'we had to ask for a Band-Aid," said Jillian's mom, Amy Thomas.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
SeaWorld's Aquatica will introduce an innovative hybrid concept to San Diego on June 1 that combines a marine park with a water park, allowing visitors to interact with animals like dolphins, stingrays and flamingos as they zip down water slides. > Photos: SeaWorld San Diego's Aquatica water park SeaWorld San Diego purchased Knott's Soak City in Chula Vista from the parent company of Knott's Berry Farm for $15 million and plans an extensive renovation of the separate-admission water park about 20 miles south of the marine park.
NATIONAL
July 6, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The two Alaskan fishermen had stopped to examine a bald eagle when they noticed something sleek and gray in the Bristol Bay surf: a baby beluga whale in the shallows, faintly whistling and clicking. The whale, already dehydrated and disoriented, soon swam away, but then circled back to shore. The fishermen began making phone calls. In almost no time, marine specialists raced in. The Alaska SeaLife Center - a research and rehabilitation organization - grounded local flights, then settled the whale calf on an air mattress, draped him in wet towels and airlifted him toward safety.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
The smooth, quick and quiet Manta family coaster that debuted over Memorial Day  weekend at SeaWorld San Diego is just the type of thrilling ride the marine park sorely needs. PHOTOS: Manta roller coaster at SeaWorld San Diego The knock on the sea life show-heavy park has always been that it doesn't have enough rides. Over the past few years, SeaWorld has added a number of kiddie rides, but this summer the park finally got around to satisfying the tween set. For a 30-foot-tall family coaster with a top speed of 43 mph, the $35-million Manta manages to pack a lot of surprises into its modest proportions while even delivering a pair of firsts for a U.S. coaster.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Not everything is bigger in Texas. The new Aquatica water park at SeaWorld San Antonio will be one-third the size and cost half as much as the innovative Aquatica water park at SeaWorld Orlando . PHOTOS: Aquatica water park at SeaWorld San Antonio Debuting May 19, the Aquatica park in Texas will feature 18 water slides on 20 acres at a cost of more than $24 million. That's considerably smaller than Florida's $50-million-plus Aquatica which debuted in 2008 with 36 slides on 60 acres as the new high-water mark for water parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
David W. Kenney, SeaWorld's first veterinarian, who played a key role in bringing the original Shamu to the San Diego amusement park as well as a gray whale believed to be the first raised by humans, died Feb. 14 in Montrose, Colo. He was 77. The cause was cancer, said his sister, Meredith Maler. Kenney was hired by the park a few weeks before its 1964 opening and over the next several years displayed an ingenuity and dedication that helped the fledgling tourist attraction build and maintain an impressive collection of marine animals.
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