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Sebastian Barry

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By David Ng
The 2013 season at the Mark Taper Forum will feature plays by Bruce Norris and Sebastian Barry, as well as revivals of classics by August Wilson and Joe Orton. Actor Brian Dennehy will be featured in Barry's "The Steward of Christendom. "  In all, the new season, which will begin in February, will offer five productions, down from six in the current season. "Tribes," by Nina Raine, will kick off the season (Feb. 27-April 14) in a production directed by David Cromer. The staging comes from New York's Barrow Street Theatre, where the comedy currently is running.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Whatever form Irish novelist and playwright Sebastian Barry happens to be working in, you can be sure that he will be drunk with language. Words make him swoon. He loves the way they sound and slide off each other, the singsong rhythms they fall into under his wand, their echo in time. This devotion to verbal patterning is both his signal strength and conspicuous weakness as a dramatist. In "The Steward of Christendom," Barry's 1995 play now being revived at the Mark Taper Forum as a star vehicle for Brian Dennehy, retrospective prose substitutes for dramatic action.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Whatever form Irish novelist and playwright Sebastian Barry happens to be working in, you can be sure that he will be drunk with language. Words make him swoon. He loves the way they sound and slide off each other, the singsong rhythms they fall into under his wand, their echo in time. This devotion to verbal patterning is both his signal strength and conspicuous weakness as a dramatist. In "The Steward of Christendom," Barry's 1995 play now being revived at the Mark Taper Forum as a star vehicle for Brian Dennehy, retrospective prose substitutes for dramatic action.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Brian Dennehy sat cross-legged on a stool and bent to rub his aching right knee and shin. His day of rehearsing "The Steward of Christendom" would soon be done. But the physical nicks and dings that the former Columbia University football lineman and ex-Marine copes with at age 75 weren't his main concern. He was more worried about getting his head around the part he'd handpicked for himself to play at the Mark Taper Forum, knowing full well that it's a forbidding green monster. Green because it's Irish, Dennehy's favorite flavor by birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Brian Dennehy sat cross-legged on a stool and bent to rub his aching right knee and shin. His day of rehearsing "The Steward of Christendom" would soon be done. But the physical nicks and dings that the former Columbia University football lineman and ex-Marine copes with at age 75 weren't his main concern. He was more worried about getting his head around the part he'd handpicked for himself to play at the Mark Taper Forum, knowing full well that it's a forbidding green monster. Green because it's Irish, Dennehy's favorite flavor by birth.
BOOKS
March 13, 2005 | Richard Zimler, Richard Zimler is the author of, most recently, "Hunting Midnight," which has been nominated for the International Dublin IMPAC Literary Award, and the forthcoming novel "Guardian of the Dawn."
Up until the last few decades, history books tended to reflect only the interests and judgments of those who won the battles and elections, and to systematically exclude the viewpoints of those who lost. Therein lies one of the most exciting motivations for the writing of historical fiction: to allow men and women omitted from official accounts of events -- or even slandered -- to describe their experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Two first-time novelists are among six finalists for the prestigious Man Booker prize for fiction. Indian novelist Aravind Adiga was nominated Tuesday for his debut, "The White Tiger," which tells the story of a man's dreams of escaping poor village life for success in the big city. Australia's Steve Toltz, another first-time novelist, writes about a father-son relationship in "A Fraction of the Whole." Ireland's Sebastian Barry, a finalist with "The Secret Scripture," was previously nominated in 2005 for "A Long Long Way."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Six finalists were named in London on Thursday for Britain's prestigious -- and financially rewarding -- Man Booker Prize, but U.S. readers will have to wait to read most of the titles. The finalists include "Never Let Me Go," about three young friends being raised to supply body parts to others, by Kazuo Ishiguro, who previously won for "The Remains of the Day." The short list includes three other previous finalists.
BOOKS
April 22, 2007 | Nick Owchar
WHAT'S another word for an ill-conceived anthology? Try "cemetery": a bunch of strangers lined up and stripped of all context, except for a slight headstone -- an editor's brief explanatory note. "The Writer's World" series -- "Irish Writers on Writing," "Mexican Writers on Writing," "Polish Writers on Writing" (Trinity University Press: $24.95 each, paper) -- defies this sepulchral sentiment. How?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
Robert Alter, a UC Berkeley professor and author of 22 works on the Bible, literary modernism and contemporary Hebrew literature, will be the 29th recipient of the Robert Kirsch Award when the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes are presented April 24. The Kirsch is a lifetime achievement honor named for a past L.A. Times book critic. The Times Book Prizes honor 45 nominees in nine categories. Here is a complete list: Biography H.W.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By David Ng
The 2013 season at the Mark Taper Forum will feature plays by Bruce Norris and Sebastian Barry, as well as revivals of classics by August Wilson and Joe Orton. Actor Brian Dennehy will be featured in Barry's "The Steward of Christendom. "  In all, the new season, which will begin in February, will offer five productions, down from six in the current season. "Tribes," by Nina Raine, will kick off the season (Feb. 27-April 14) in a production directed by David Cromer. The staging comes from New York's Barrow Street Theatre, where the comedy currently is running.
BOOKS
March 13, 2005 | Richard Zimler, Richard Zimler is the author of, most recently, "Hunting Midnight," which has been nominated for the International Dublin IMPAC Literary Award, and the forthcoming novel "Guardian of the Dawn."
Up until the last few decades, history books tended to reflect only the interests and judgments of those who won the battles and elections, and to systematically exclude the viewpoints of those who lost. Therein lies one of the most exciting motivations for the writing of historical fiction: to allow men and women omitted from official accounts of events -- or even slandered -- to describe their experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
One thing's for sure with "Frank Loesser's Hans Christian Andersen": You will believe a Dane can fly. For in truth we have here "Martha Clarke's Frank Loesser's Hans Christian Andersen," and everyone in this half-crazy, elegant misfire spends 50% of their stage time above the stage, not on it--floating figments of its subject's tortured romantic imagination.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said Tuesday it will pay $1.2 billion for a controlling stake in Mexico's No. 1 retailer, Cifra, placing a major bet that this country's beleaguered consumers will finally start feeling the economic recovery. The move--the largest U.S. investment to date in Mexico's retail sector--will turn this country into Wal-Mart's biggest foreign market, with 373 stores. Previously, Wal-Mart had run 145 stores here in a joint venture with Cifra.
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