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Sebastian Faulks

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2010 | By Tim Rutten
The English writer Sebastian Faulks is one of those curious novelists whose predilection for well-told stories and popularity with readers often have seemed impediments to serious regard. That's a bit unfair because, with its knowing nods to Trollope, Dickens and Tom Wolfe, "A Week in December" -- his ninth work of full-length fiction -- is a formally ambitious, intelligently entertaining, rather provocative novel of contemporary manners. Moreover, while the story is deeply rooted in today's London, if you tweaked a couple of the characters slightly and adjusted some of the social style for local nuance, the author's essential points could just as aptly apply to Manhattan's Upper West Side or, for that matter, Brentwood Park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It was a threesome in Mumbai that persuaded the judges to give the 2013 Bad Sex in Fiction award to Manil Suri for his novel "The City of Devi. " The award was presented in London on Tuesday by film and television star Joan Collins. In one notable passage, Suri wrote , "Surely supernovas explode that instant, somewhere, in some galaxy. The hut vanishes, and with it the sea and the sands -- only Karun's body, locked with mine, remains. We streak like superheroes past suns and solar systems, we dive through shoals of quarks and atomic nuclei.
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BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | GEORGE GARRETT
First published in England last year, "Birdsong," by former journalist Sebastian Faulks, is the story of a young Englishman, Stephen Wraysford, who goes to France in 1910 on a business trip, impulsively falls into a passionate and adulterous love affair and chooses to remain in France. When the war comes, Wraysford joins the British army and by 1916 is in combat. He serves and suffers until the end.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Long-dead folk hero Woody Guthrie leads the contenders for the 2013 Bad Sex in Fiction prize . The shortlist was announced by the Literary Review, a London literary journal that endeavors -- through embarrassment, mostly -- to coax novelists to do a better job writing about sex. Guthrie wrote his only completed novel, "House of Earth," in 1947. It had been filed away with Guthrie's papers and languished undiscovered until recently, when scholar Douglas Brinkley came across a mention and went looking for it. Johnny Depp launched his HarperCollins imprint with it in October of this year.
BOOKS
April 7, 1996 | George Garrett, George Garrett's new novel is "The King of Babylon Shall Not Come Against You" (Harcourt Brace)
Judging by this century's literature, we have been (certainly since 1914) and we remain deeply haunted by the shocking images, like shell fragments, of the first World War: the trenches, the shell holes and barbed wire, the mud and excrement, the terrible wounds and the casualties beyond calculation. To this day they are still digging up dangerous unexploded shells in parts of Belgium and France.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007 | Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON -- Sebastian Faulks is comfortable in the past, and readers love him for it. It's the present that has eluded him. The British writer is best known for intelligent, stirring historical novels that have sold in the millions: the World War II Resistance saga "Charlotte Gray" and "Birdsong," a story of love and war set in the trenches of World War I. Faulks' latest novel, "Engleby," is a departure -- so much so that he offered to have it published under a pseudonym.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2010
A Week in December A Novel Sebastian Faulks Doubleday: 392 pp., $27.95
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It was a threesome in Mumbai that persuaded the judges to give the 2013 Bad Sex in Fiction award to Manil Suri for his novel "The City of Devi. " The award was presented in London on Tuesday by film and television star Joan Collins. In one notable passage, Suri wrote , "Surely supernovas explode that instant, somewhere, in some galaxy. The hut vanishes, and with it the sea and the sands -- only Karun's body, locked with mine, remains. We streak like superheroes past suns and solar systems, we dive through shoals of quarks and atomic nuclei.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Long-dead folk hero Woody Guthrie leads the contenders for the 2013 Bad Sex in Fiction prize . The shortlist was announced by the Literary Review, a London literary journal that endeavors -- through embarrassment, mostly -- to coax novelists to do a better job writing about sex. Guthrie wrote his only completed novel, "House of Earth," in 1947. It had been filed away with Guthrie's papers and languished undiscovered until recently, when scholar Douglas Brinkley came across a mention and went looking for it. Johnny Depp launched his HarperCollins imprint with it in October of this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2012 | Louis Bayard, Bayard is a novelist and reviewer whose most recent book is "The School of Night."
A Possible Life A Novel in Five Parts Sebastian Faulks Henry Holt: 304 pp. $25 -- In the wake of bestselling, highly praised historical tales such as "Birdsong" and "Charlotte Gray," Sebastian Faulks has been hailed as one of those authors who straddles art and commerce -- which may be another way of saying he belongs to neither camp entirely. We should not be surprised, then, that his latest book, "A Possible Life," gravitates between poles of its own. At first blush, it is a collection of five longish short stories, self-containable, not obviously related, ranging in era from early 19th century France to futuristic Italy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2012 | Louis Bayard, Bayard is a novelist and reviewer whose most recent book is "The School of Night."
A Possible Life A Novel in Five Parts Sebastian Faulks Henry Holt: 304 pp. $25 -- In the wake of bestselling, highly praised historical tales such as "Birdsong" and "Charlotte Gray," Sebastian Faulks has been hailed as one of those authors who straddles art and commerce -- which may be another way of saying he belongs to neither camp entirely. We should not be surprised, then, that his latest book, "A Possible Life," gravitates between poles of its own. At first blush, it is a collection of five longish short stories, self-containable, not obviously related, ranging in era from early 19th century France to futuristic Italy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2010
A Week in December A Novel Sebastian Faulks Doubleday: 392 pp., $27.95
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2010 | By Tim Rutten
The English writer Sebastian Faulks is one of those curious novelists whose predilection for well-told stories and popularity with readers often have seemed impediments to serious regard. That's a bit unfair because, with its knowing nods to Trollope, Dickens and Tom Wolfe, "A Week in December" -- his ninth work of full-length fiction -- is a formally ambitious, intelligently entertaining, rather provocative novel of contemporary manners. Moreover, while the story is deeply rooted in today's London, if you tweaked a couple of the characters slightly and adjusted some of the social style for local nuance, the author's essential points could just as aptly apply to Manhattan's Upper West Side or, for that matter, Brentwood Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
James Bond was the 20th century's most famous spy and -- almost as certainly -- one of its best-known literary characters. Had he lived, 007's creator, Ian Fleming, would be 100 years old today.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007 | Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON -- Sebastian Faulks is comfortable in the past, and readers love him for it. It's the present that has eluded him. The British writer is best known for intelligent, stirring historical novels that have sold in the millions: the World War II Resistance saga "Charlotte Gray" and "Birdsong," a story of love and war set in the trenches of World War I. Faulks' latest novel, "Engleby," is a departure -- so much so that he offered to have it published under a pseudonym.
NEWS
May 27, 2002 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
THE FATAL ENGLISHMAN Three Short Lives By Sebastian Faulks Vintage 314 pages; $14 * The three doomed and glamorous Englishmen who are the subjects of Sebastian Faulks' sparklingly written trio of biographies were fair-haired boys in every sense of the phrase: gifted, charming, filled with promise, but fated to early deaths. Christopher Wood set off for France in 1921 to become (as he hoped) the world's greatest painter.
NEWS
May 27, 2002 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
THE FATAL ENGLISHMAN Three Short Lives By Sebastian Faulks Vintage 314 pages; $14 * The three doomed and glamorous Englishmen who are the subjects of Sebastian Faulks' sparklingly written trio of biographies were fair-haired boys in every sense of the phrase: gifted, charming, filled with promise, but fated to early deaths. Christopher Wood set off for France in 1921 to become (as he hoped) the world's greatest painter.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a magic surrounding Charlotte Gray. A blond-haired, blue-stockinged Scottish lass, she travels down to the bombed-out London of 1942 with the determination to put her brains to work for the war effort. Intense, intelligent and innocent, Charlotte falls in love with an RAF pilot named Peter Gregory and, after his plane disappears, volunteers as a courier to track him down in occupied France.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a magic surrounding Charlotte Gray. A blond-haired, blue-stockinged Scottish lass, she travels down to the bombed-out London of 1942 with the determination to put her brains to work for the war effort. Intense, intelligent and innocent, Charlotte falls in love with an RAF pilot named Peter Gregory and, after his plane disappears, volunteers as a courier to track him down in occupied France.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | GEORGE GARRETT
First published in England last year, "Birdsong," by former journalist Sebastian Faulks, is the story of a young Englishman, Stephen Wraysford, who goes to France in 1910 on a business trip, impulsively falls into a passionate and adulterous love affair and chooses to remain in France. When the war comes, Wraysford joins the British army and by 1916 is in combat. He serves and suffers until the end.
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