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Sebastian International

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BUSINESS
April 22, 1986 | ALAN GOLDSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The wet head is no longer dead. And Sebastian International, a Woodland Hills-based hair-care company whose best-selling products are called Shpritz, Shpritz Forte and, of course, Wet, is capitalizing on the trend. The company has become a hair-care leader by touting its products as a necessity for a certain contemporary look in hair styles. "They're hot, probably the hottest in the business," said Mary Atherton, editor of Modern Salon, a trade magazine that carries advertising from the company.
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NEWS
January 26, 1997 | JANET WISCOMBE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From her perch at a table on the marble terrace of their Villa Dei Fiori, Geri Cusenza listens as husband John talks about his journey from the poor streets of Tunisia to the pinnacles of fortune. John Cusenza, better known as John Sebastian of Sebastian International, is a big warm bear of a man who reigns as patriarch of the multimillion-dollar family-owned beauty business, a company with a reputation ranging from earth consciousness to Molding Mud.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | MICHELE LINGRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the mid-1980s, John Sebastian Cusenza, founder and president of the hair-care and cosmetics company Sebastian International Inc., abandoned several of his products that contained harmful or polluting ingredients such as ammonia. Instead, he started marketing products that were more environmentally sensitive. He chose the Rainforest Foundation--a high-profile charity that fights the destruction of the Amazon rain forest--to be a symbol of Sebastian International's new "green" image.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surf's up here, and Sebastian International Inc. is hoping to catch a wave. So the Woodland Hills-based hair salon products company is bringing more than 2,000 people to Huntington Beach's Waterfront Hilton next week for a convention and sales force pep rally tied to the company's role as a major sponsor of the inaugural U.S. Open of Surfing. Sebastian will also be introducing a new line of products. "We're involved with the U.S.
NEWS
December 24, 1987
Here's a typical pre-party scene: a straight-haired woman tearing her hair in frustration before the mirror because . . . it just won't curl! Or a curly haired woman also tearing her hair because . . . it won't curl the way she wants! Oh, sure, they could set it, but not everyone can manage that these days. And a permanent, well, that means permanent damage, at least until the hair grows out.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surf's up here, and Sebastian International Inc. is hoping to catch a wave. So the Woodland Hills-based hair salon products company is bringing more than 2,000 people to Huntington Beach's Waterfront Hilton next week for a convention and sales force pep rally tied to the company's role as a major sponsor of the inaugural U.S. Open of Surfing. Sebastian will also be introducing a new line of products. "We're involved with the U.S.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sebastian International did more than sing the praises of its latest cuts and colors early this week at the Hairdressers' Guild show in Long Beach. Executives of the Woodland Hills hair-care and cosmetics company put employees in issue-oriented T-shirts ("Protect the Planet, Protect the Species"), introduced biodegradable packaging and sealed its commitment to the Rainforest Foundation with a $50,000 check and a promise of $200,000 more by the end of the year.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | JANET WISCOMBE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From her perch at a table on the marble terrace of their Villa Dei Fiori, Geri Cusenza listens as husband John talks about his journey from the poor streets of Tunisia to the pinnacles of fortune. John Cusenza, better known as John Sebastian of Sebastian International, is a big warm bear of a man who reigns as patriarch of the multimillion-dollar family-owned beauty business, a company with a reputation ranging from earth consciousness to Molding Mud.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | THE FASHION STAFF
The French fashion community is hoping to lure even more Italian, English and American designers to show in Paris. The French Culture Ministry and Paris' Federation of Haute Couture and Ready-to-Wear have finalized an agreement to build a brand-new complex devoted to fashion shows. The building, scheduled to open in 1993 in the gardens of the Louvre, is being designed by I. M. Pei, the architect of the controversial Louvre Pyramid, and Michael Macary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weeping jungle animals survey a field of tree stumps, thinking: "If people cut the trees, we will have to live in the zoo." An enfeebled planet Earth with a red thermometer in its mouth grieves that "the world is getting sicker and sicker." Those were among the paintings shown to 16 elementary school students at Sebastian International's Woodland Hills headquarters Wednesday.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | MICHELE LINGRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the mid-1980s, John Sebastian Cusenza, founder and president of the hair-care and cosmetics company Sebastian International Inc., abandoned several of his products that contained harmful or polluting ingredients such as ammonia. Instead, he started marketing products that were more environmentally sensitive. He chose the Rainforest Foundation--a high-profile charity that fights the destruction of the Amazon rain forest--to be a symbol of Sebastian International's new "green" image.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sebastian International did more than sing the praises of its latest cuts and colors early this week at the Hairdressers' Guild show in Long Beach. Executives of the Woodland Hills hair-care and cosmetics company put employees in issue-oriented T-shirts ("Protect the Planet, Protect the Species"), introduced biodegradable packaging and sealed its commitment to the Rainforest Foundation with a $50,000 check and a promise of $200,000 more by the end of the year.
NEWS
December 24, 1987
Here's a typical pre-party scene: a straight-haired woman tearing her hair in frustration before the mirror because . . . it just won't curl! Or a curly haired woman also tearing her hair because . . . it won't curl the way she wants! Oh, sure, they could set it, but not everyone can manage that these days. And a permanent, well, that means permanent damage, at least until the hair grows out.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1986 | ALAN GOLDSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The wet head is no longer dead. And Sebastian International, a Woodland Hills-based hair-care company whose best-selling products are called Shpritz, Shpritz Forte and, of course, Wet, is capitalizing on the trend. The company has become a hair-care leader by touting its products as a necessity for a certain contemporary look in hair styles. "They're hot, probably the hottest in the business," said Mary Atherton, editor of Modern Salon, a trade magazine that carries advertising from the company.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1998 | Josh Susong
This month, mousse and conditioner purveyor Sebastian International celebrates its 25th anniversary; and so, as a result, does the world's first crimping iron. It was big and solid, 50 watts of heavy-duty crimping power, and Barbra Streisand's trademark '70s look--think "A Star Is Born" waves--inspired its invention.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Winner in Spain: In San Sebastian, Spain, an Argentine film by a director who has not shot a movie in four years won the top prize at Europe's oldest film festival. "Un Lugar en el Mundo (A Place in the World)," directed by Adolfo Aristarain, won the Golden Shell award for the best film at the San Sebastian International Film Festival. Critics have called the film, an account of a man's return to the small village where he grew up, Aristarain's best work.
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