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Sebastian Junger

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June 9, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Last Oscar season, author Sebastian Junger and photojournalist Tim Hetherington walked the red carpet together. Their documentary "Restrepo," recorded while they were embedded with a U.S. Army platoon in Afghanistan's remote and dangerous Korengal Valley, was nominated for an Academy Award. For months the two men had lived with the troops, sharing the same food, the same stifling quarters, and the same long stretches of boredom punctuated by moments of adrenaline-fueled terror.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Sebastian Junger's heartfelt, intense and maddening (in the right way) documentary "Which Way Is the Front Line From Here?: The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington" examines the open-hearted, peripatetic nature of his acclaimed "Restrepo" co-director, who was killed in a mortar attack in 2011 covering the civil war in Libya. A brave, curious soul with an uncanny, almost serene connection to the humanity of his subjects - blinded war children and theatrically dangerous rebel fighters in West Africa, close-knit American soldiers in Afghanistan (the subject of "Restrepo")
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010
BOOKS Nicholas Montemarano The author of the novel "A Fine Place" and the short-story collection "If the Sky Falls" writes with dark honesty and arresting clarity. He will read from the manuscript of his recently completed novel, "The Book of Why," which he has been writing for the past three years. A brief discussion and book signing will follow. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 7 p.m. Free. (310) 443-7000. hammer.ucla.edu. Sebastian Junger The contributing editor to Vanity Fair and author of "The Perfect Storm" has penned another dispatch of adventurous journalism with "War," a vivid account of battlefield life in Afghanistan's Korengal Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011
The soldiers walk single file along the crest of the spur spaced ten or fifteen yards apart. The terrain falls off steeply on both sides into holly forests and shale scree. The moon is so bright that they're not even using night vision gear. Unknown to Winn and his men, three enemy fighters are arrayed across the crest of the ridge below them, waiting with AK-47s. Parallel to the trail are ten more fighters with belt-fed machine guns and RPGs. In the U.S. military, this is known as an "L-shaped ambush.
BOOKS
April 23, 2006 | Barry Siegel, Barry Siegel, a former Times national correspondent, directs the literary journalism program at UC Irvine, where he is a professor of English. He won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2002.
IN his first book, "The Perfect Storm," Sebastian Junger made clear his attraction to chronicling the unknowable. "I've written as complete an account as possible of something that can never be fully known," he advised us at the start. "It is exactly that unknowable element ... that has made it an interesting book to write." If he pulled it off -- and I'd say he did -- it's because he faced the problem head-on.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | ANTHONY DAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You remember in Norman Maclean's 'Young Men and Fire' when he says that the young firefighters [soon to die in a forest fire] didn't know they owed the universe a tragedy? "I felt that way until I cut my leg." This is Sebastian Junger talking. He was working in suburban New York taking down trees from the top, piece by piece, with a chain saw. One day he forgot to bring his leather boots, so he was up in a tree in tennis shoes.
BOOKS
June 6, 1999
Gay Degani, homemaker: "Caesar: Let the Dice Fly" by Colleen McCullough (William Morrow). " 'Caesar: Let the Dice Fly,' the latest in McCullough's 'Masters of Rome' series, details Caesar's campaign in Gaul and his decision to cross the Rubicon. People--and politicians--haven't changed much over the last 2,000 years." **** Douglas Post, lawyer: "The Perfect Storm" by Sebastian Junger (HarperPaperbacks).
NEWS
October 17, 2002 | Scott Timberg
Rambles from a rambler With his chiseled jaw, bulky physique and daring exploits -- dropping into war zones to interview warlords, hanging with firefighters -- Sebastian Junger can seem at a distance like a slim, literary Schwarzenegger. But at a reading and signing at the Central Library last Thursday night, the "Perfect Storm" author seemed somewhere between a big, innocent kid and what one observer called "a really smart bartender" with a knack for war stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Sebastian Junger's heartfelt, intense and maddening (in the right way) documentary "Which Way Is the Front Line From Here?: The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington" examines the open-hearted, peripatetic nature of his acclaimed "Restrepo" co-director, who was killed in a mortar attack in 2011 covering the civil war in Libya. A brave, curious soul with an uncanny, almost serene connection to the humanity of his subjects - blinded war children and theatrically dangerous rebel fighters in West Africa, close-knit American soldiers in Afghanistan (the subject of "Restrepo")
BOOKS
April 23, 2006 | Nick Owchar, Nick Owchar is deputy editor of Book Review.
"AFTER 'The Perfect Storm,' I knew I didn't want to write about the sea, meteorology or storms anymore," Sebastian Junger said in a recent phone interview from his Cape Cod home. "I was done with that. I didn't want to become trapped in a category where I was expected to write about only one thing." Following the success of his 1997 bestseller, Junger was eager to find new literary ground. He traveled overseas and started writing about war zones around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Last Oscar season, author Sebastian Junger and photojournalist Tim Hetherington walked the red carpet together. Their documentary "Restrepo," recorded while they were embedded with a U.S. Army platoon in Afghanistan's remote and dangerous Korengal Valley, was nominated for an Academy Award. For months the two men had lived with the troops, sharing the same food, the same stifling quarters, and the same long stretches of boredom punctuated by moments of adrenaline-fueled terror.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010
BOOKS Nicholas Montemarano The author of the novel "A Fine Place" and the short-story collection "If the Sky Falls" writes with dark honesty and arresting clarity. He will read from the manuscript of his recently completed novel, "The Book of Why," which he has been writing for the past three years. A brief discussion and book signing will follow. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 7 p.m. Free. (310) 443-7000. hammer.ucla.edu. Sebastian Junger The contributing editor to Vanity Fair and author of "The Perfect Storm" has penned another dispatch of adventurous journalism with "War," a vivid account of battlefield life in Afghanistan's Korengal Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Marjorie Miller, Los Angeles Times
On a typically blissful Sunday morning in Southern California, physically and figuratively about as far as you can get from eastern Afghanistan's Korengal Valley, hundreds of Angelenos have come to hear author Sebastian Junger speak about men at war on the other side of the world. Junger's latest book, "War" (Twelve: 290 pp., $26.99), has been compared to Michael Herr's Vietnam-era "Dispatches." To an audience at this year's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at UCLA, the journalist is quick to highlight the differences between Herr's subject and his own. Vietnam, he explains, was an unpopular war fought with draftees, while the war in Afghanistan has broader public support and a force that willingly signed up to fight.
BOOKS
April 23, 2006 | Barry Siegel, Barry Siegel, a former Times national correspondent, directs the literary journalism program at UC Irvine, where he is a professor of English. He won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2002.
IN his first book, "The Perfect Storm," Sebastian Junger made clear his attraction to chronicling the unknowable. "I've written as complete an account as possible of something that can never be fully known," he advised us at the start. "It is exactly that unknowable element ... that has made it an interesting book to write." If he pulled it off -- and I'd say he did -- it's because he faced the problem head-on.
BOOKS
April 23, 2006 | Nick Owchar, Nick Owchar is deputy editor of Book Review.
"AFTER 'The Perfect Storm,' I knew I didn't want to write about the sea, meteorology or storms anymore," Sebastian Junger said in a recent phone interview from his Cape Cod home. "I was done with that. I didn't want to become trapped in a category where I was expected to write about only one thing." Following the success of his 1997 bestseller, Junger was eager to find new literary ground. He traveled overseas and started writing about war zones around the world.
NEWS
October 17, 2002 | Scott Timberg
Rambles from a rambler With his chiseled jaw, bulky physique and daring exploits -- dropping into war zones to interview warlords, hanging with firefighters -- Sebastian Junger can seem at a distance like a slim, literary Schwarzenegger. But at a reading and signing at the Central Library last Thursday night, the "Perfect Storm" author seemed somewhere between a big, innocent kid and what one observer called "a really smart bartender" with a knack for war stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011
The soldiers walk single file along the crest of the spur spaced ten or fifteen yards apart. The terrain falls off steeply on both sides into holly forests and shale scree. The moon is so bright that they're not even using night vision gear. Unknown to Winn and his men, three enemy fighters are arrayed across the crest of the ridge below them, waiting with AK-47s. Parallel to the trail are ten more fighters with belt-fed machine guns and RPGs. In the U.S. military, this is known as an "L-shaped ambush.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Marjorie Miller, Los Angeles Times
On a typically blissful Sunday morning in Southern California, physically and figuratively about as far as you can get from eastern Afghanistan's Korengal Valley, hundreds of Angelenos have come to hear author Sebastian Junger speak about men at war on the other side of the world. Junger's latest book, "War" (Twelve: 290 pp., $26.99), has been compared to Michael Herr's Vietnam-era "Dispatches." To an audience at this year's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at UCLA, the journalist is quick to highlight the differences between Herr's subject and his own. Vietnam, he explains, was an unpopular war fought with draftees, while the war in Afghanistan has broader public support and a force that willingly signed up to fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2001 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He'd witnessed mayhem in Bosnia, Sierra Leone and Cypress, but none of that prepared journalist Sebastian Junger for the 30 days he spent in Afghanistan last November. The visit, chronicled in the "Frontline Diaries: Into the Forbidden Zone" documentary to air Tuesday at 9 p.m. on the National Geographic Channel, threw even this seasoned war correspondent for a loop.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Perfect Storm" didn't get its name by being nice. Rather, as Sebastian Junger's book explained, this was "a storm that could not possibly have been worse," a marine event with 120-mph winds, rain so intense it drowned birds in mid-flight and waves of a size "few people on Earth have ever seen." When meteorologists began calling this the storm of the century, no one thought to argue. Taken from Junger's enormously popular book (3.
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