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Sebastiao Salgado

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2002 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
A Brazilian gold mine as a hellishly beautiful pit, strung with rickety ladders and crawling with human worker bees. An Indian train station so unbearably crowded that a stream of people pressed between two railway cars gushes into a flood. A ravishingly gorgeous Ecuadorean landscape, cut by a long, sad line of women trudging to market. Sebastiao Salgado's moody black-and-white pictures of the world's poor and oppressed make a visual epic of human drama and travail.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Sebastião Salgado embarked on his "Genesis" project as a recovery mission -- for himself as much as for the planet. After decades documenting varieties of human and environmental degradation, the photographer set off in 2004 to record populations and landscapes untouched by modernity. He sought evidence of people and places living in equilibrium, to affirm that it was still possible. Completed in 2011, "Genesis" offers a stunning visual antidote to the tougher, bleaker side of Salgado's output.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sebastiao Salgado is not as well as he appears. The photographer has just returned from the refugee camps of Tanzania, the war-ravaged streets and hills of Rwanda, the slowly rebuilding society of Mozambique, only to find himself suffering from malaria. The Brazilian-born photographer, whose work can be seen at the Fahey/Klein Gallery through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2002 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
A Brazilian gold mine as a hellishly beautiful pit, strung with rickety ladders and crawling with human worker bees. An Indian train station so unbearably crowded that a stream of people pressed between two railway cars gushes into a flood. A ravishingly gorgeous Ecuadorean landscape, cut by a long, sad line of women trudging to market. Sebastiao Salgado's moody black-and-white pictures of the world's poor and oppressed make a visual epic of human drama and travail.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1990 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For all those who have wondered what happens to a famine when it leaves the front page or if children stop dying just because cameras stop recording, photojournalist Sebastiao Salgado provides an answer. Surprisingly, it's not a completely sad revelation, as we see in "An Uncertain Grace: Photographs by Sebastiao Salgado," an exhibition of more than 120 images from 1977 to the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Sebastião Salgado embarked on his "Genesis" project as a recovery mission -- for himself as much as for the planet. After decades documenting varieties of human and environmental degradation, the photographer set off in 2004 to record populations and landscapes untouched by modernity. He sought evidence of people and places living in equilibrium, to affirm that it was still possible. Completed in 2011, "Genesis" offers a stunning visual antidote to the tougher, bleaker side of Salgado's output.
BOOKS
September 12, 1993 | Jose Galvez, Jose Galvez is a former Los Angeles Times photographer who now runs a picture stock agency in Tucson, Ariz
This is, in many ways, a monumental work. Its price tag: $100. Its weight: A tad under seven pounds. The number of photographs: 350. Countries visited: 21. Workers photographed: in the thousands. Brazilian photographer Salgado has created a photographic essay devoted to the multitudes who toil for their daily bread. He has divided the book into six chapters: Agriculture, Food, Mining, Industry, Oil and Construction.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2001
Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado captures the bleak lives of men, women and children in Rwanda, Mexico, Mozambique and the Sudan in "Salgado: The Spectre of Hope" (7 p.m. Cinemax). SERIES "The Job," ABC's offbeat police show starring Denis Leary as an unconventional New York cop with a wife, a mistress and some bad habits, returns at 9:30 p.m. MOVIES Kevin Bacon stars in "Hollow Man" (10 p.m. Cinemax), a violent variation on the invisible man saga.
BOOKS
December 9, 2007 | Sara Lippincott
THE celebrated Brazilian photojournalist Sebastiao Salgado has recorded numerous major upheavals on the African continent, beginning in the mid-1970s -- wars of independence, civil wars, drought, famine, genocide. In "Africa" (Taschen: 336 pp., $59.99), more than 300 of his photographs, dating from 1974 to 2006, are beautifully reproduced.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sebastiao Salgado is not as well as he appears. The photographer has just returned from the refugee camps of Tanzania, the war-ravaged streets and hills of Rwanda, the slowly rebuilding society of Mozambique, only to find himself suffering from malaria. The Brazilian-born photographer, whose work can be seen at the Fahey/Klein Gallery through Sept.
BOOKS
September 12, 1993 | Jose Galvez, Jose Galvez is a former Los Angeles Times photographer who now runs a picture stock agency in Tucson, Ariz
This is, in many ways, a monumental work. Its price tag: $100. Its weight: A tad under seven pounds. The number of photographs: 350. Countries visited: 21. Workers photographed: in the thousands. Brazilian photographer Salgado has created a photographic essay devoted to the multitudes who toil for their daily bread. He has divided the book into six chapters: Agriculture, Food, Mining, Industry, Oil and Construction.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1990 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For all those who have wondered what happens to a famine when it leaves the front page or if children stop dying just because cameras stop recording, photojournalist Sebastiao Salgado provides an answer. Surprisingly, it's not a completely sad revelation, as we see in "An Uncertain Grace: Photographs by Sebastiao Salgado," an exhibition of more than 120 images from 1977 to the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1997
Works offered by auction by top photographers, including Sid Avery, Greg Gorman, Mary Ellen Mark, Annie Liebovitz, Sebastiao Salgado, Alfred Steiglitz and William Wegman, can be previewed through Wednesday (10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.) at the G. Ray Hawkins Gallery in Santa Monica, 910 Colorado Ave. Both live and silent auctions of the works will be held Thursday from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Directors Guild in Hollywood, 7920 Sunset Blvd.
NEWS
February 25, 1999 | CHRIS RUBIN
Local photographer Mark Edward Harris traveled the world to meet, interview and photograph 20 master photographers, all of whom have shot memorable iconic images that helped define the 20th century. The result is "Faces of the Twentieth Century: Master Photographers and Their Work" (Abbeville Press, 1998), a coffee-table book that combines Harris' pictures of these photographers with five of their own classic images, in addition to lengthy interviews.
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