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BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- A major Wall Street figure did something unusual in a settlement with the country's top securities regulator: admit he did something wrong. Philip Falcone, a billionaire who runs the hedge fund Harbinger Capital Partners, must admit wrongdoing in addition to paying an $18-million penalty to settle two June 2012 enforcement actions by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Falcone also agreed to be barred from the securities industry for at least five years. “Falcone and Harbinger engaged in serious misconduct that harmed investors, and their admissions leave no doubt that they violated the federal securities laws,” Andrew Ceresney, the SEC's co-director of enforcement, said in a statement.
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SPORTS
September 11, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
A day after Sports Illustrated unveiled a five-part series alleging football corruption at Oklahoma State, a Yahoo Sports investigation alleged that five SEC players took impermissible benefits  while they were in college. The list includes former Alabama star offensive tackle D.J. Fluker, former Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray, another Tennessee player and two from Mississippi State. We'll see where this leads and how fast the NCAA responds. Alabama Athletic Director Bill Battle issued a statement saying the school was looking into the charge against Fluker before the Yahoo report.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission pressed Facebook Inc. executives to explain in more detail how a user shift to mobile devices could impact the company's profits, according to documents made public Friday. "Assuming that the trend toward mobile continues and your mobile monetization efforts are unsuccessful, ensure that your disclosure fully addresses the potential consequences to your revenue and financial results rather than just stating that they 'may be negatively affected,'" the agency wrote to Facebook on Feb. 28. Facebook shares have fallen about 24% since the stock began trading at $38 on May 18 in part because of concern about the company's mobile strategy.
SPORTS
September 20, 2009 | Associated Press
No. 23 Georgia 52, at Arkansas 41: Joe Cox threw for 375 yards and five touchdowns for the Bulldogs (2-1, 2-0), who overcame a 408-yard, five-touchdown effort by Ryan Mallett of the Razorbacks (1-1, 0-1). at No. 4 Alabama 53, North Texas 7: Greg McElroy passed for two touchdowns to lead the Crimson Tide (3-0). at No. 5 Mississippi 52, Southeastern Louisiana 6: Jevan Snead threw three touchdown passes for the Rebels (2-0). at No. 9 Louisiana State 31, Louisiana Lafayette 3: Chad Jones had two interceptions for the Tigers (3-0)
SPORTS
December 2, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
ATLANTA -- No one down here in Southeastern Conference country was surprised Sunday when the final Bowl Championship Series standings confirmed Alabama would be playing Jan. 7 for the national title. The surprise is why the SEC isn't playing the SEC again, just like last season. "Do you think Florida deserves to play for the national title more than Notre Dame?" someone actually asked Alabama Coach Nick Saban on Saturday after his team clinched the SEC with a 32-28 win over Georgia.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - They've called from pay phones. They've had furtive meetings at hotels and even a church. On internal government documents, they go by code names like Mr. X. For the last year, whistle-blowers deep inside corporate America have been dishing dirt on their employers under a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission program that could give them a cut of multimillion-dollar penalties won by financial regulators. A new bounty program has been an intelligence boon to the securities industry regulator, which has struggled to redeem itself after failing to stop Bernard Madoff's epic Ponzi scheme and rein in Wall Street before the 2008 financial crisis.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The Securities and Exchange Commission has declined to impose new regulations on money market mutual funds, which were exposed as vulnerable during the 2008 financial crisis. Panicked investors withdrew more than $300 million from the funds in one week in September 2008. This cast doubt on the security of the funds, which are not insured. SEC Chairwoman Mary L. Schapiro had lobbied for new regulations that would require the funds to keep cash reserves to cover large redemptions, and to let their prices fluctuate like other mutual funds.
SPORTS
November 22, 2009
at No. 1 Florida 62, Florida International 3: Tim Tebow accounted for three touchdowns and Brandon Spikes returned an interception for a score to extend the nation's longest winning streak to 21 games. Florida improved to 11-0 for only the second time in school history. at No. 2 Alabama 45, Chattanooga 0: Mark Ingram ran for 102 yards and two long touchdowns in the first half, and the Crimson Tide breezed. Ingram ran for touchdowns of 25 and 40 yards, and Javier Arenas set the SEC career record with his seventh punt return for a touchdown, sprinting 66 yards.
SPORTS
November 1, 2009 | Associated Press
at No. 9 Louisiana State 42, Tulane 0: Brandon LaFell caught two touchdown passes, moving him into second on LSU's career list, and the ninth-ranked Tigers shut out the Green Wave (2-6) for the first time since 1969. Charles Scott rushed for 112 yards. at Tennessee 31, No. 21 South Carolina 13: The Volunteers took three fumbles and turned them into touchdowns in the upset. Jonathan Crompton threw two touchdowns, Montario Hardesty ran for two more and Rico McCoy forced two fumbles as Coach Lane Kiffin grabbed his first win over a ranked opponent.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2008 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission has backed away from its plan to force money managers to disclose publicly how they've "shorted" stocks. The agency late Wednesday announced changes to a series of emergency rules it put in place beginning Sept. 17 to curb short selling, which has been fingered -- some say unfairly -- as a major cause of the collapse of many bank and brokerage stocks. As expected, the SEC, under Chairman Christopher Cox, said it would extend its outright ban on shorting of nearly 1,000 financial stocks beyond the scheduled expiration today.
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