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BUSINESS
August 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Federal regulators Wednesday proposed a plan to allow public companies to begin using international accounting standards for reporting financial results in two years, and may require them to do so starting in 2014. The push by the Securities and Exchange Commission toward acceptance of a single, global accounting standard has raised objections from some investor advocates and key lawmakers. Supporters of the change say it makes sense in an era of increasingly globalized financial markets and would help lure foreign companies to U.S. markets.
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SPORTS
October 18, 2009 | Associated Press
at No. 2 Alabama 20, No. 22 South Carolina 6: Mark Ingram rushed for a career-high 246 yards and a game-clinching touchdown to help the Crimson Tide (7-0, 4-0) overcome four turnovers. The Gamecocks are 5-2, 2-2. Kentucky 21, at Auburn 14: Randall Cobb scored the go-ahead touchdown on a four-yard run with 3:17 to play and the Wildcats (3-3, 1-3) defeated the Tigers (5-2, 2-2) for the first time since 1966. Cobb set up the score with a 61-yard run two plays earlier. Georgia 34, at Vanderbilt 10: Joe Cox threw two touchdown passes, including one to Caleb King, who scored twice, and the Bulldogs (4-3, 3-2)
SPORTS
October 4, 2009 | Associated Press
No. 3 Alabama 38, at Kentucky 20: Mark Ingram ran for a career-high 140 yards and two touchdowns against mistake-prone Kentucky. Alabama quarterback Greg McElroy added a pair of scoring passes as the Crimson Tide (5-0, 2-0) pulled away from the Wildcats (2-2, 0-2) during a dizzying stretch in the second and third quarters when it scored 24 points in just over five minutes. No. 21 Mississippi 23, at Vanderbilt 7: Jevan Snead passed for three touchdowns to overcome his three interceptions for the Rebels.
SPORTS
November 22, 2012 | By Gary Klein
Lane Kiffin irked more than one Southeastern Conference coach during his short tenure at Tennessee. And his exit from Knoxville to USC in 2010 still makes tempers boil in SEC country. But with Alabama, Georgia and Florida still in the mix for the Bowl Championship Series title, coaches and fans across the South will be rooting for Kiffin and the Trojans on Saturday when they play top-ranked and unbeaten Notre Dame at the Coliseum. A USC victory opens the door, perhaps, for another all-SEC title game.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - As a lawyer in private practice, Mary Jo White worked for Wall Street all-stars: banking giant JPMorgan Chase & Co., auditor Deloitte & Touche, former Bank of America Corp. chief Ken Lewis. White, President Obama's pick to lead the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, even did legal work for former Goldman Sachs Group Inc. director Rajat Gupta, the highest-profile catch in the federal government's crackdown on insider trading, according to disclosures White filed ahead of her U.S. Senate confirmation hearing.
SPORTS
December 7, 2013 | Chris Dufresne
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The final Saturday of the first Bowl Championship Series season in 1998 ended with shocking losses by Kansas State and UCLA that turned the BCS on its ear hole. Wild endings in St. Louis and Miami that day put Tennessee and Florida State in the first title game. It seemed only right that the final Saturday of the last BCS season should match that chaotic conclusion. Well, it certainly tried. In the end, though, somehow, it sort of broke cleanly. How?
BUSINESS
July 15, 2010 | By Walter Hamilton, Tom Petruno and James Oliphant
The $550-million deal between Goldman Sachs Group and federal regulators to settle the highest profile fraud case stemming from the financial crisis gave each side a measure of what it desperately needed. The government finally had an answer for critics who say Washington has been too soft on Wall Street. And Goldman Sachs could get on with making money, paying a fine that it can easily afford. Thursday's settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission came as Congress passed the most significant financial reform in decades — legislation designed to prevent the type of abuses Goldman was accused of. With the law, President Obama declared a new era of oversight for the financial industry.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2002
Why is the Securities and Exchange Commission worried about Cole Bartiromo ["SEC Files New Charges Against Teen," April 30]? He's simply taking advantage of the stupid and the greedy. Joe Martin Lakewood
BUSINESS
February 7, 2010 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
When it comes to securities fraud, 2009 was either the best of times or the worst. Both arguments are made in the statistics. Last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the nation's top investment regulator: Sought 71 temporary restraining orders to halt misconduct and prevent further harm to investors. That was up 82% from 2008. Doubled the number of formal investigations of securities violations. Ordered wrongdoers to disgorge some $2.1 billion in ill-gotten gains, up 170% from the previous year.
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