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Secession Movement

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999
The effort to split off the San Fernando Valley from Los Angeles cleared a major hurdle earlier this month when Los Angeles County elections officials validated more than 132,000 signatures on a petition to study the creation of what would become the nation's sixth-largest city. The costly analysis, estimated at $8 million, would tally and divide the city's assets and liabilities to ultimately determine whether a Valley city would be economically self-sufficient.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2010 | By Rich Connell and Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Keith Richman, a three-term Republican state assemblyman who fought for pension reform and was a leader in the San Fernando Valley secession movement, has died. He was 56. Richman died of brain cancer Friday at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, said his brother Craig. A physician, Richman was elected in 2000 to the California Assembly, representing the 38th District, which includes the Santa Clarita Valley, Simi Valley and northeast San Fernando Valley. He could serve only six years because of term limits.
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OPINION
June 2, 2002 | BILL BOYARSKY, Bill Boyarsky, former city editor and columnist for The Times, is senior consultant for the Center for Governmental Studies and a lecturer at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communications. He is writing a biography of the late California political leader, Jesse M. Unruh.
On San Fernando Valley nights lately, if you have a long memory, you can almost sense Howard Jarvis' ghost prowling the shopping centers and suburban neighborhoods where he found recruits for his Proposition 13, the state constitutional amendment that has forever limited the growth of government in California. Jarvis was the prototype neighborhood character, a loud, unmannerly, cantankerous former pro boxer who loved a stiff drink almost as much as he loved bending his neighbors' ears about crooked politicians and spendthrift bureaucrats.
OPINION
July 22, 2002
"Marital Bliss Just Pipe Dream" (July 18), concerning the new cities' water supply in the event of secession, is inadequate in that it merely echoes the Local Agency Formation Commission's decision that the water supply is "community property" that can be divided just like any other asset. It ignores the fact that the Valley and Hollywood would be reneging on an agreement they made to annex to Los Angeles to obtain water from the Owens Valley. LAFCO's assumption is that this is no longer a valid legal agreement, and the new cities would retain proportional rights to this water, as well as the L.A. River water, after secession.
OPINION
June 1, 2002
Ron Kaye, managing editor of the Daily News, was a journalistic "watchdog" long before there ever was a Valley secession movement ("Daily News Becomes a Herald of Secession," May 30). How about a few words--in this story, not the next one--about The Times' financial stake in opposing secession? As a former Daily News reporter, I would like to note for the record that the paper's editing style has changed little in the last decade, with the exception of today's more sensational headlines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000
I couldn't help but laugh at Jeff Brain's comparison of city secession to the civil rights and women's suffrage movements ("Secession Efforts Are Part of an American Activist Tradition," Dec. 10). These historical movements were about the individual's rights to fundamental liberties conferred upon them by the 14th Amendment of the United States Constitution, not a debate over whose street is cleaner or who receives better trash pickup. Forgive my cynicism, but I find it quite amusing whenever I hear wealthy attorneys and multimillion-dollar business owners touting "grass-roots" efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying they fear the impact of the San Fernando Valley's proposed secession on Latinos, several prominent community activists have called a summit--at which leaders of the secession movement are not welcome. The invitation-only forum Saturday already has ignited a local political firestorm and may mark the emergence of the first grass-roots group to question the wisdom, for Valley residents, of secession from Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999
This is to inform the citizens of the northwest San Fernando Valley, namely the area covered by LAPD's Devonshire Division, that there is a persistent rumor floating about regarding the department's intent on closing the jail at Devonshire. Such a closure would necessitate officers from that division taking their arrestees to a jail several miles from Devonshire Division, most likely Van Nuys area jail. In such an event, Devonshire Division would be depleted of resources at various times, as there usually exists a backlog of bookings in the Van Nuys Jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001
Michael Finnegan's story about LAFCO [Local Agency Formation Commission] executive Larry Calemine's conflict of interest activities with lobbyists and developers reinforces other evidence that he is not an objective person to be heading the secession study ("LAFCO Official Earns Substantial Fees Advising Clients on City Hall Business," Feb. 6). Recently, Calemine supported Valley VOTE's attack on a city study that showed that the San Fernando Valley only produced 31% of the city's tax revenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying they fear the impact on Latinos, several prominent community activists have called a summit on splitting the San Fernando Valley from Los Angeles--one to which leaders of the secession movement are not welcome. The invitation-only forum Saturday has already ignited a local political firestorm and may mark the emergence of the first grass-roots group to question the wisdom of secession for Valley residents.
OPINION
June 2, 2002 | BILL BOYARSKY, Bill Boyarsky, former city editor and columnist for The Times, is senior consultant for the Center for Governmental Studies and a lecturer at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communications. He is writing a biography of the late California political leader, Jesse M. Unruh.
On San Fernando Valley nights lately, if you have a long memory, you can almost sense Howard Jarvis' ghost prowling the shopping centers and suburban neighborhoods where he found recruits for his Proposition 13, the state constitutional amendment that has forever limited the growth of government in California. Jarvis was the prototype neighborhood character, a loud, unmannerly, cantankerous former pro boxer who loved a stiff drink almost as much as he loved bending his neighbors' ears about crooked politicians and spendthrift bureaucrats.
OPINION
June 1, 2002
Ron Kaye, managing editor of the Daily News, was a journalistic "watchdog" long before there ever was a Valley secession movement ("Daily News Becomes a Herald of Secession," May 30). How about a few words--in this story, not the next one--about The Times' financial stake in opposing secession? As a former Daily News reporter, I would like to note for the record that the paper's editing style has changed little in the last decade, with the exception of today's more sensational headlines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2002 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what's been described as an "unintended consequence" of the secession movement, an expanse of hillsides and canyons above Hollywood, home to about 20,000 people, may be virtually cut off from the rest of Los Angeles if the San Fernando Valley and Hollywood secede from the city. The odd situation has produced, at least in this corner of Los Angeles, a lot of believers in what the 17th-century author John Donne once sermonized: "No man is an island."
NEWS
May 1, 2002 | JOHN BALZAR
What Los Angeles needs: a coherent discussion of our shared future. What Los Angeles has: a laugh track. Greater Los Angeles--you define its boundaries--is a community, except in name. Except in organization. Except by how we govern ourselves. Regionally, we have grown big without thinking big. We entrust no civic body, no individuals, to see from our mountains to our coast. Yet vision, above all, is the catalyst for making our community livable. At the start of the millennium, I opened a file folder for news clippings: "Ideas Offered for the Future of Los Angeles."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2002 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Right next to the bakery where they make Wonder Bread, in a quiet business park on the site of San Pedro's old drive-in movie theater, a group of church volunteers, retired teachers and union members are plotting revolution. Andrew Mardesich, an earnest nonstop talker who sometimes garbles quotes from the Founding Fathers, lays out for the gathering his vision of a community so small, so intimate that the mayor is your brother-in-law and your city councilman is the local dentist.
OPINION
February 3, 2002 | JOEL KOTKIN
The San Fernando Valley secession movement is stalled. What once seemed all but inevitable now appears increasingly unlikely. There are many reasons, most of them unrelated to the virtue of the cause. For example, the state's energy crisis during the past year highlighted the importance of the Valley's link to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Sept. 11 and its aftermath made the very idea of breaking away seem "unpatriotic." But the biggest obstacle to the success of the secession movement is the Valley's own political and social culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1997 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before the governor has decided whether to sign newly enacted legislation that would allow neighborhoods or regions to divorce themselves from the cities where they are located, a new group has been formed to press ahead with the secession of the San Fernando Valley from Los Angeles. A formal announcement is expected this afternoon at a news conference. "The next phase is the implementation of the bill when the governor signs it," said Sherman Oaks homeowner leader Richard Close.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001
What a disappointment. One Los Angeles, a new group formed to fight San Fernando Valley secession, is following the example of its nemesis in keeping its donor list secret. The secession group Valley VOTE for years has refused to disclose who funds its Valley cityhood campaign. Both groups cite fear of retribution to excuse keeping the public in the dark about who is bankrolling the battle of Los Angeles. Never mind the question of what happened to the courage of one's convictions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001
What a disappointment. One Los Angeles, a new group formed to fight San Fernando Valley secession, is following the example of its nemesis in keeping its donor list secret. The secession group Valley VOTE for years has refused to disclose who funds its Valley cityhood campaign. Both groups cite fear of retribution to excuse keeping the public in the dark about who is bankrolling the battle of Los Angeles. Never mind the question of what happened to the courage of one's convictions.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somalia's first central government in a decade is struggling to assert its authority, sparking fears that the country could once again disintegrate into the anarchy it witnessed in the early 1990s. There are no properly functioning ministries. With government offices in ruins, most Cabinet ministers conduct their daily business in heavily guarded homes or hotel rooms.
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