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Second Presidential Debate

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NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON - So much for political fatigue. Television viewers appeared hungry to watch the second matchup between President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, with an estimated 65.6 million people tuning in to watch Tuesday night's debate between the two men at Hofstra University, according to Nielsen . That was just a 2% dip from the 67.2 million who watched the first debate on Oct. 3. The biggest drop-off was among television...
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Claire Zulkey
  New "SNL" cast member Aidy Bryant may wish that CNN correspondent Candy Crowley was a more high-profile part of the 2012 presidential campaign. After lurking in the background of the new season, especially compared with breakout new cast addition Kate McKinnon, the Second City actress finally got the chance to appear front and center Saturday night as she introduced the episode's cold open (and closed it by delivering the show's classic introductory line.) Not surprisingly, the second presidential debate was the topic of the cold open.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Claire Zulkey
  New "SNL" cast member Aidy Bryant may wish that CNN correspondent Candy Crowley was a more high-profile part of the 2012 presidential campaign. After lurking in the background of the new season, especially compared with breakout new cast addition Kate McKinnon, the Second City actress finally got the chance to appear front and center Saturday night as she introduced the episode's cold open (and closed it by delivering the show's classic introductory line.) Not surprisingly, the second presidential debate was the topic of the cold open.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By James Rainey
A review of by a non-partisan media monitor found that Republican Mitt Romney endured more interruptions than President Obama did during Tuesday's second presidential debate. Obama cut off Romney in mid-sentence 36 times, while Romney cut off Obama 28 times, according to the Center for Media and Public Affairs at George Mason University in Virginia. Moderator Candy Crowley cut off Romney 23 times, compared with the 15 times she cut off Obama. The organization combined all forms of interruption and found that Romney was interrupted 59 times, compared with 43 times for Obama.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By David Horsey
If the Barack Obama who showed up for the second presidential debate had shown up for the first debate, there is a good chance Republicans would now be sullenly turning their thoughts to 2016 and arguing over how they got tricked into nominating a loser two elections in a row. The Obama who did show up for that first debate breathed new life into Romney's candidacy by being lifeless himself. Tuesday night, though, the president was in command. He reinvigorated his own campaign by delivering the best debate performance of his political career.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2012 | By Paul West and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. - In a town-hall-style debate that was supposed to focus on questions from ordinary voters, President Obama and Mitt Romney circled each other on the stage and engaged in finger-pointing displays, arguing over energy, immigration and the deadly attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya. Obama ducked a question from audience member Kerry Ladka about who in the administration had denied a request for extra diplomatic security in Libya, and why. But Obama seized an opening when Romney challenged the president's statement that he had described the incident as an act of "terror" on the day after the attack.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
President Obama misstated the rising rate of healthcare costs. Vice President Joe Biden mischaracterized the drawdown of troops in Afghanistan. Mitt Romney overstated the number of jobless Americans, a figure his running mate, Paul D. Ryan, repeated. None of those misleading statements in the last two debates was as important, however, as the way they were delivered: by a slumberous Obama, an energetic Biden, an authoritative Romney and an earnest if sometimes ruffled Ryan. When Obama and Romney meet on New York's Long Island on Tuesday night for their second matchup, this one a town-hall-style debate, legions of experts will be ready to pounce on their every utterance, calling out exaggerations and citing obvious omissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1992
Remember in the second presidential debate when George Bush couldn't explain how the recession has affected him and his family? I think he can now. CHRIS HIBLER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
NBC isn't the only network that will deal with a scheduling problem over the upcoming presidential debates. Several days after NBC management decided to air the debate after all (in lieu of Summer Olympics coverage), ABC is now facing a similar sports-vs.-politics problem, the Washington Post reported Tuesday. On the night of Oct. 5, the vice-presidential debate between Sen. Dan Quayle (R-Ind.) and Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
President Obama will be a guest on “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart” next Thursday, Comedy Central announced Friday. It will be Obama's second visit to the show since he took office and his sixth overall. The appearance is scheduled for just two days after Tuesday's second presidential debate. Host Stewart , like many other pundits, was fiercely critical of the president's lackluster performance in the first debate against Mitt Romney, and with the various missteps his campaign has made since -- especially a mocking ad featuring Big Bird.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
American women may have gotten a fabulous idea for a Halloween costume from Tuesday night's presidential debate - wrap themselves in binders! - but they didn't get an answer to the one question exclusively about them. When 24-year-old Katherine Fenton asked, "In what new ways do you intend to rectify the inequalities in the workplace, specifically regarding females making only 72% of what their male counterparts earn?" both men danced around the issue with the Republican and Democratic versions of the gender-gap two-step.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
Gentlemen, gentlemen, there's no reason to fight over us. Really. Well, in fact, I suppose there is. It was the undecided voters invited to the town hall at Hofstra University who were the nominal target audience of the presidential debate Tuesday night, but it was women -- the majority of voters and the gender gap that Democrats have relied on, and that Republicans hope to close -- who were being wooed by President Obama and GOP rival Mitt...
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON - So much for political fatigue. Television viewers appeared hungry to watch the second matchup between President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, with an estimated 65.6 million people tuning in to watch Tuesday night's debate between the two men at Hofstra University, according to Nielsen . That was just a 2% dip from the 67.2 million who watched the first debate on Oct. 3. The biggest drop-off was among television...
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Bob Secter, Chicago Tribune
President Obama's once commanding lead in Wisconsin had evaporated before Tuesday night's second presidential debate, and a once-Democratic tilting U.S. Senate contest had become a dead heat, according to a new poll. A Marquette University Law school survey released Wednesday showed a virtual tie between Obama and Republican Mitt Romney, with the president up by 49% to 48% among likely voters, well within the poll's 3.4 percentage point margin of error.   The race, poll director Charles Franklin said, was “just as close as it could possibly be at this point.” Just two weeks ago, a Marquette poll gave Obama a 53% to 42% edge over Romney in Wisconsin, which has 10 electoral votes and had once been all but ceded to the Democrats, but that margin largely vanished after Romney's commanding performance in the first presidential debate two weeks ago. DEBATE QUIZ: Who said it?
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Michael McGough
If one thing seemed clear after Tuesday's presidential debate, it was that Mitt Romney had been caught in an embarrassing error over whether President Obama had referred to the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, as an act of terror.  But Romney supporters are insisting that Romney was right after all. Here's the key exchange: Obama: "The day after the attack, governor, I stood in the Rose Garden and I told the American people and the world that we are going to find out exactly what happened.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By David Horsey
If the Barack Obama who showed up for the second presidential debate had shown up for the first debate, there is a good chance Republicans would now be sullenly turning their thoughts to 2016 and arguing over how they got tricked into nominating a loser two elections in a row. The Obama who did show up for that first debate breathed new life into Romney's candidacy by being lifeless himself. Tuesday night, though, the president was in command. He reinvigorated his own campaign by delivering the best debate performance of his political career.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By James Rainey
A review of by a non-partisan media monitor found that Republican Mitt Romney endured more interruptions than President Obama did during Tuesday's second presidential debate. Obama cut off Romney in mid-sentence 36 times, while Romney cut off Obama 28 times, according to the Center for Media and Public Affairs at George Mason University in Virginia. Moderator Candy Crowley cut off Romney 23 times, compared with the 15 times she cut off Obama. The organization combined all forms of interruption and found that Romney was interrupted 59 times, compared with 43 times for Obama.
OPINION
October 16, 2012
President Obama bounced back in Tuesday's presidential debate with a focused and forceful presentation nothing like his neurasthenic performance in his first encounter with Mitt Romney. That's obviously a relief for Obama partisans, but the president's articulate defense of his own policies and his detailed dissection of his opponent's also served the electorate in general by bringing sharply into focus the fundamental differences between the candidates. Obama was most effective in a task that he fumbled badly in the first debate: challenging the Republican candidate's insistence that he can achieve across-the-board cuts in tax rates without aggravating the federal deficit or depriving middle-income Americans of tax breaks they have come to rely on. Romney insisted that under his (still sketchy)
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Watch news clips of Tuesday night's presidential debate and chances are that the back-and-forth between President Obama and GOP challenger Mitt Romney on energy policy will loom large -- not because of the policies under discussion, which were a rehash of old talking points, but because of the playground-style sniping ("Did not reduce drilling on federal lands!" "Did so!") that might have marked a new low point in the history of such debates. For anybody who cares which man was telling the truth in that embarrassing exchange (they both were, sort of)
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By James Rainey
The second Obama-Romney debate featured much more spirited exchanges than debate No. 1 two weeks ago. And Politics Now's video Debate of the Debate - pitting liberal Times Columnist Michael Hiltzik against conservative blogger Jon Fleischman - promises more of the same. We're not guaranteeing the “quien es mas macho”-style stare downs that President Obama and challenger Mitt Romney exchanged Tuesday night at Hofstra University in New York. But there will be plenty of energy at 10:30 a.m. PDT, 1:30 EDT, from Hiltzik, an authority on business and economic history, and Fleischman, a one-time California Republican Party official and editor of the conservative Flash Report blog.
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