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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
The board of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District will decide tonight whether to overhaul its secondary education programs. The decision comes on the heels of the discovery that the vast majority of the incoming students at Newport Harbor High School read at their grade level. Supt. Mac Bernd said the board may decide to study ways to change the curriculum. The board will also consider ways to improve the space at the district's secondary schools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Navigating the job market without a college degree is harder than ever, but there are plenty of solid jobs in the U.S. that don't require degrees, according to a new report. Some 29 million so-called middle jobs - those with annual salaries of more than $35,000 but that don't require college degrees - exist in the U.S., according to a report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. That's 1 in 5 jobs. Of those, 11 million pay $50,000 or more a year.
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SPORTS
January 29, 2005 | From Associated Press
Freddie Mitchell's big mouth struck again. Philadelphia's other loquacious receiver -- the one without the Pro Bowl pedigree and ankle injury -- offended some members of the New England Patriots when he dissed the team's secondary in a television interview. Mitchell, a starter only because All-Pro Terrell Owens is hurt, said he just knew the numbers -- not the names -- of New England's cornerbacks. He singled out Rodney Harrison, saying he "has something" for the veteran strong safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2009 | From A Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Senate on Friday confirmed Thelma Melendez de Santa Ana, Pomona's schools chief, as the U.S. assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education. Praised as a reform-minded leader, Melendez has been superintendent of the 33,000-student Pomona Unified School District since 2006. She was named California's superintendent of the year in November by the Assn. of California School Administrators. In her new role, she will be a top advisor to Education Secretary Arne Duncan.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | United Press International
President Bush will nominate John MacDonald, commissioner of education for the state of New Hampshire, to be assistant education secretary for elementary and secondary education, the White House announced Wednesday.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | United Press International
Beryl Dorsett was sworn in Thursday as assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, becoming the first woman to hold the position.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Beryl Dorsett, acting principal of an elementary school in the Bronx, N.Y., will be nominated by President Reagan to be the Education Department's assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, it was announced Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
Concordia University will host a "Focus Day" from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday for people considering a career in early childhood, elementary and secondary education. The public is welcome to attend the free event, which will be held on campus in the Faculty/Staff Lounge. Barbara Morton, dean of the School of Education, will give a presentation of careers in those fields. She will also describe the school's programs that offer credentials.
NEWS
December 5, 1986
Education Secretary William J. Bennett said that his department will spend $15.5 million next year to combat drug abuse on college campuses. Bennett, at a luncheon sponsored by the department's Fund for the Improvement of Post Secondary Education, complained that school administrators are ignoring or tolerating illegal drug use by students, often because of a fear of litigation. "I fear that this issue, if not addressed . . . will damage higher education severely," Bennett said.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Senate Democrats increased pressure on the White House to increase spending on education, warning they may hold up action on President Bush's school proposals until a dispute concerning funding is resolved. While White House and congressional negotiators have agreed on a wide range of policy changes to improve education, they remain far apart on funding for elementary and secondary education next year. Democrats are seeking an increase of $13 billion.
SPORTS
January 29, 2005 | From Associated Press
Freddie Mitchell's big mouth struck again. Philadelphia's other loquacious receiver -- the one without the Pro Bowl pedigree and ankle injury -- offended some members of the New England Patriots when he dissed the team's secondary in a television interview. Mitchell, a starter only because All-Pro Terrell Owens is hurt, said he just knew the numbers -- not the names -- of New England's cornerbacks. He singled out Rodney Harrison, saying he "has something" for the veteran strong safety.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Senate Democrats increased pressure on the White House to increase spending on education, warning they may hold up action on President Bush's school proposals until a dispute concerning funding is resolved. While White House and congressional negotiators have agreed on a wide range of policy changes to improve education, they remain far apart on funding for elementary and secondary education next year. Democrats are seeking an increase of $13 billion.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From the Washington Post
President Bush, seeking to inject momentum into the impending Senate debate over his goal of reshaping the federal role in education, said Wednesday that he is making progress with Democrats on the "core principles" of his plan.
OPINION
September 3, 2000 | MARY ANNE SCHWALBE and SUZI SCHIFFER PARRASCH, Mary Anne Schwalbe serves on the board of directors for the Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children and recently returned from Myanmar, Sudan and Serbia. Suzi Schiffer Parrasch is a writer and consultant for the commission
Millions of American parents and children are now enjoying the last days of summer vacations--camp, backyard barbecues, baseball, long days at the beach--before thoughts turn to school. However, for millions of refugee children around the world, a forced "summer vacation" from school carries the threat of becoming a permanent vacation. "The moment I became an orphan my life stopped," says Stefanie, a young Rwandan girl living in a muddy refugee camp outside Gisenyi.
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Democratic pol is stumping for votes among the black political establishment in the San Gabriel Valley. Over lunch at the Sheraton hotel in Pomona, she rails against racism, profiteering oil companies and the growing wealth gap, all reliable Democratic issues. But when it comes to schools, Sen. Dianne Feinstein doesn't sound much like a proud defender of the education establishment and its powerful unions.
NEWS
March 3, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate passed legislation Thursday that would press two popular election-year buttons at once: expanding the amount of money parents could save tax-free and allowing them to spend it on their children's education. A splinter group of Democrats joined the Republican majority in support of the measure, dubbed the "Affordable Education Act."
NEWS
August 22, 1985
I read with interest your article (Aug. 1) about the possibility of Naval ROTC at Hoover High School. I applaud the community's efforts to add this option to Glendale secondary education. Naval ROTC offers our youth a window to another world. Whether students elect to enter the military in their later years, they will have learned about an element of our world that they would not have understood as well otherwise. I wish this effort the traditional Navy blessing: May they have smooth seas and a following wind!
MAGAZINE
August 1, 1999
Karen Michel's recollection of English teacher Fred Holtby and University High School in the early 1960s brought back floods of memories ("Both Sides Now," June 27). I was in the Class of 1964, which Holtby described to a classmate of mine a few years ago as "the last class of Jewish intellectuals." I remember a friend exhorting me to sign up for Holtby's English class: "He'll teach you how to read"--and he did. Holtby introduced us to the life of the mind, leaving an indelible imprint.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
None of the Great Society ambitions has been frustrated more bitterly than the dream of narrowing the education gap between poor children and kids who go home to more comfortable beds. Since 1965, Washington has poured more than $120 billion into that effort through Title I, a massive program that pays for extra instruction for low-income students. Nearly half of all American schools, and one-quarter of all students, receive services (such as tutoring and remedial instruction) under Title I.
MAGAZINE
August 1, 1999
Karen Michel's recollection of English teacher Fred Holtby and University High School in the early 1960s brought back floods of memories ("Both Sides Now," June 27). I was in the Class of 1964, which Holtby described to a classmate of mine a few years ago as "the last class of Jewish intellectuals." I remember a friend exhorting me to sign up for Holtby's English class: "He'll teach you how to read"--and he did. Holtby introduced us to the life of the mind, leaving an indelible imprint.
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