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Secord

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990
Isn't it ironic that Secord is now calling Reagan "cowardly"? Here is a man who lied to his country. He didn't have the guts to stand up for the truth! Secord, a convicted felon, should be lucky that he received a probationary sentence. The fact that he now says Reagan is cowardly carries no weight. A real coward is someone who is afraid to stand up for the truth when the moment is at hand. KELVIN D. FILER Compton
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BUSINESS
June 20, 1994 | KEN STIER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, who won notoriety for his role in the Iran-Contra scandal during the Reagan Administration, spent part of his Air Force career trying to bring this city to its knees. Nowadays, instead of flying combat missions in tactical fighter aircraft at several thousand feet, he is pounding the pavement, trying to make business deals with his former adversaries.
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NEWS
May 23, 1987 | SARA FRITZ and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
Joseph Coors, the Colorado brewer who donated $65,000 to buy a single-engine plane for the Nicaraguan resistance, was shocked to learn this week that the aircraft now belongs not to the contras but to retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, a middleman in the Iran-contra affair. "I didn't give this money to Gen. Secord," Coors told the congressional Iran-contra investigating committees. "I gave it to the freedom fighters of Nicaragua."
BOOKS
October 11, 1992 | Larry Bensky, National-affairs correspondent for Pacifica radio, Bensky won a George Polk award for his coverage of the Iran-Contra hearings
When a defensive, truculent retired Air Force major general appeared as the first witness testifying to the Iran-Contra committees in the summer of 1987, few in the packed Senate hearing room, or among those following the hearings nationwide, were prepared to assess his significance in the burgeoning scandal. Even after three days on the witness stand, Richard Secord remained an enigma. Why was he the first witness called? What had he really done? By whose authorization?
NEWS
June 9, 1989
U.S. District Judge Aubrey Robinson today consolidated two sets of indictments against former Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord into a 12-count package of charges stemming from the Iran-Contra scandal. The government, which asked for the consolidation of the charges, is expected to ask Robinson to dismiss three other counts. Secord, who worked closely with fired White House aide Oliver L. North in establishing a private aid network for the Nicaraguan Contra rebels, was indicted in March, 1988, on six counts.
NEWS
March 21, 1988 | United Press International
The independent counsel in the Iran-Contra case has evidence that retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord and Albert A. Hakim, his Iranian-born business partner, used nearly $1 million from the proceeds of the Iran arms sales for their personal gain, the Chicago Tribune reported today. Independent counsel Lawrence E.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord pleaded not guilty Monday to nine felony charges that he lied to the congressional Iran-Contra committees when he swore that he did not expect to profit from secret arms sales directed by Oliver L. North. Secord, 56, who showed no emotion during his brief arraignment, also faces an earlier conspiracy indictment stemming from an independent counsel's Iran-Contra investigation. Defense lawyer Thomas C. Green persuaded U.S. District Judge Aubrey E. Robinson Jr. to delay the perjury case for 10 days while government and defense lawyers discuss which trial should come first or whether they should be heard together.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | Associated Press
Two assistants to retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord told House and Senate investigators that they shredded records last December after public disclosure of the Iran- contra affair, according to depositions released Tuesday. But one of the office workers later changed her testimony, telling the congressional Iran-contra committees in a sworn affidavit that the shredding more likely took place in November.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The independent counsel in the Iran- contra scandal has made retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord a formal target of his grand jury investigation, a source close to the investigation said Tuesday. The special counsel, Lawrence E. Walsh, has spoken with lawyers who represent the targets of his investigation and is likely to ask the grand jury in late September or October formally to issue indictments, the source said.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A key figure in the Iran-Contra affair said Thursday that President Bush played a much larger role than he has admitted in promoting secret arms-for-hostages sales during the Ronald Reagan Administration. "Bush has claimed to have been 'out of the loop' with respect to the Iran initiative. That's absolutely false," retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord said in an interview promoting a book published today.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran CIA officer testified Monday that former CIA spy chief Clair E. George had expressed concern about retired Air Force Gen. Richard V. Secord's participation in the arms for hostages deal with Iran, despite earlier statements by George to the contrary. The reluctant but potentially damaging testimony by George W.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard V. Secord, a key operative in the Iran-Contra case, testified Wednesday that he took part in a 45-minute meeting with ex-CIA spy chief Clair E. George in January, 1986--nine months before George told a Senate committee he did not know Secord.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | The Washington Post
Retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, a key figure in the network set up by former White House aide Oliver L. North to arm the Nicaraguan Contras, agreed Friday to drop an appeal of his conviction for his role in the Iran-Contra affair, according to court papers. In a plea agreement with independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, Secord last year pleaded guilty to a felony count of lying to congressional investigators and was sentenced to two years of probation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1990
Please allow me to publicly correct a part of my letter ("Secord Gets Probation," Feb. 2) and to publicly apologize to Gen. Richard V. Secord for not standing and fighting this injustice like a man. The fact is that he is doing just that. Gen. Secord writes, "I filed an appeal against the sentence" the day following his sentence, Jan. 25. "I still maintain that what we did during Iran/Contra was right, proper and legal." Gen. Secord concludes, "President Reagan has, in my opinion, behaved disgracefully.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990
Who took the blindfold off Lady Justice? How can a "justice" system say to Secord, a known criminal involved in multi-nation illegal activity (which murdered thousands of innocent people in Nicaragua), that prison would be "too harsh"? In contrast, hundreds of loyal Americans unselfishly giving their time, energy and physical comfort to call attention to major evils in U.S. foreign policy--specifically arming oppressive genocidal governments--face the possibility of prison and a fine exceeding Secord's $50!
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