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Secrecy

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NEWS
November 29, 1992 | BETH SHERMAN, NEWSDAY
Leading a double life would seem to be the exclusive domain of professional spies, fictional secret agents and undercover operatives with foreign accents. But seemingly ordinary men and women sometimes hide extraordinary secrets from those closest to them: their families, friends and co-workers. Consider the well-respected chief executive who embezzles funds from his company. The man with two wives and two sets of children who know nothing of one another's existence.
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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
If you've ever wanted to read a 20,000-word story about Edward Snowden, you'll get your chance pretty soon. The former National Security Agency contractor -- and currently world-famous intelligence leaker -- has been granting more and more interviews since he absconded with agency documents and sought asylum in Russia last year after sharing those documents with journalists. Idolized and reviled by many, one of Snowden's newest appearances in the spotlight will come in a long narrative story about his leak (and life thereafter)
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NEWS
April 15, 1990 | Associated Press
Federal court records have been unsealed in a case one attorney dubbed "Water Closet Gate" involving secret videotaping inside a police station men's room. The documents released on Friday show that Concord Police Chief George Straka was on vacation in the summer of 1986 when Capt. Bob Evans ordered the camera to be hidden in the ceiling above a urinal. Evans hoped to catch officers suspected of clogging the urinal with paper towels, resulting in the flooding of the chief's adjacent office.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Oklahoma's law governing executions is unconstitutional because privacy provisions prevent anyone from learning about the drugs used to kill the condemned, a state judge ruled Wednesday in the latest case in the growing area of death penalty litigation. Oklahoma County District Judge Patricia Parrish ruled that the state's secrecy laws prevent the courts and inmates from getting information about the drugs that would be used in executions, thus preventing them from exercising their rights under the Constitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1991 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Michael Verhoeven's film "The Nasty Girl" is Germany's entry in the foreign-language category in this year's Academy Awards. It is an occasionally surrealistic and often very funny account of a teen-aged Fraulein's distinctly unfunny and dangerous attempts to investigate the Nazi years in her hometown.
OPINION
January 10, 2014
Re "Snowden in shades of gray," Opinion, Jan. 8 Doyle McManus divides Edward Snowden as a whistle-blower (good) and a knave (bad). But what this country needs is a policy on secrecy. This will not be achieved by our Supreme Court ruling on two federal court decisions, one declaring the NSA's acts constitutional, the other the opposite. The government's "right" to secrecy should not be bounced around from one administration to the next. Nor should the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act "court" be the overseer for what is done in our name, again in secret.
OPINION
January 6, 2010 | By Jon Wiener
'For a long time now there's been too much secrecy in this city." That's what President Obama said on his first day in office. He was talking about the way George W. Bush and Dick Cheney had used 9/11 as a pretext for pulling a veil over many of their key policies and actions. Last week, Obama announced he was replacing Bush's executive order on classified documents with a new one designed to reduce secrecy. Obama's policies are a distinct improvement, but they don't really solve the underlying problem.
OPINION
February 27, 2013
When Congress and the executive branch collude to keep Americans in the dark about whether their privacy is being invaded, the Supreme Court should be willing to lift the veil of secrecy - at least to the extent of forcing the government to explain how often it is monitoring the confidential conversations of Americans. The court abdicated that important watchdog role Tuesday when it ruled 5 to 4 that a group of journalists, lawyers and activists couldn't challenge the constitutionality of a shadowy electronic surveillance program.
OPINION
March 19, 2012 | Jim Newton
We're in the second month of a vitally important experiment at the Los Angeles County Dependency Court, where court officers and others are wrestling with what it means to be watched. So far, so good: The public has gotten a look, not one child has been hurt, and awareness is slowly growing. Taking advantage of the order by Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Juvenile Court, I made another trip recently to the Monterey Park courthouse where Dependency Court is housed. Just a few months ago that would have been unthinkable, as dependency hearings - where the fates of children in the foster care system are decided - were closed except in unusual circumstances.
OPINION
August 11, 2002
You're right, there should be no secrets in a time of war ("Secrecy vs. the Republic," editorial, Aug. 6). The media have already done a great job of publishing our prospective war plans and satellite photos of our airbase in Qatar. Perhaps we could install closed-circuit cameras in the Pentagon and make President Bush conduct his security briefings on an intercom. Following this strategy sure makes me feel confident of survival. Aaron Smith Carlsbad Regarding the use of military tribunals and lack of openness by the Justice Department in holding detainees: If we use the tools of the enemy to fight the enemy, how then do we distinguish ourselves from the enemy?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A Los Angeles County supervisor blasted her government attorneys Tuesday for not allowing her to see reports from internal investigations of deputy-involved shootings and other use-of-force incidents. Gloria Molina, who has frequently complained about the cost to the county of lawsuits alleging wrongdoing by the Sheriff's Department, said board members aren't getting information needed to decide whether taxpayers should pay to represent deputies in court. Molina wants other board members to support her request for Sheriff's Department investigation records related to a September 2013 deputy-involved shooting in East Los Angeles.
OPINION
February 9, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The public knows a great deal more now about a Los Angeles Police Department shooting than it did a few weeks ago. We know that officers fired more than 100 shots into and at a truck in Torrance on the morning of Feb. 7, 2013, only to discover that fleeing former LAPD Officer Christopher Dorner was not inside; instead, the truck was occupied by two women delivering morning newspapers. We know that one officer fired 28 rounds, and that officers were so poorly arrayed that they fired toward one another, adding to the confusion in the predawn darkness.
OPINION
January 12, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The 10-month gap between Sheriff Lee Baca's departure at the end of this month and the swearing-in of his elected successor in December should be a time of decisive action, not a ponderous waiting period or quiet intermission. Problems in the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department are deep and require immediate attention. Baca's unexpected but welcome resignation creates an unusual opportunity, before the arrival of an elected sheriff, to lock in badly needed reforms. Even as candidates campaign for the job and deputies wonder who their next leader will be, there is an existing diagnosis of the department's problems and an agenda for fixing them.
OPINION
January 10, 2014
Re "Snowden in shades of gray," Opinion, Jan. 8 Doyle McManus divides Edward Snowden as a whistle-blower (good) and a knave (bad). But what this country needs is a policy on secrecy. This will not be achieved by our Supreme Court ruling on two federal court decisions, one declaring the NSA's acts constitutional, the other the opposite. The government's "right" to secrecy should not be bounced around from one administration to the next. Nor should the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act "court" be the overseer for what is done in our name, again in secret.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | By Paul Pringle and Rong-Gong Lin II
City Councilman Bernard C. Parks on Monday said Gov. Jerry Brown failed California taxpayers by ignoring his complaints about secrecy surrounding the deal that gave USC control of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and nearly all of its revenue. Parks said Brown and his representatives never replied to a letter the councilman sent the governor last June asking him to block the lease agreement between the private university and the publicly owned stadium. "They did not want to hear the information," Parks said.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Gus met his birth mother only once after being adopted. But she watches his life unfold on Facebook week by week: His first day of preschool, toting a tiny backpack spangled with letters and numbers. The purple turkey he sculpted in class. The Katy Perry song he now loves to sing. "You can never be loved enough," said Beth Stapleton, who adopted the 4-year-old with her husband, Joel, right after Gus was born. The Michigan family created a private page to share photos and videos with his birth mother, and later did the same for their adopted daughter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1986
California's Brown Act requires boards of supervisors, city councils, water districts, school boards and other local bodies to conduct business in public. The broad protections are good for democracy, but an action that violates the law can remain valid and secrecy is rarely, if ever, penalized. Those weaknesses need correcting. Assembly Bill 2674 would strengthen the Brown Act and make it easier to enforce. The California Legislature should make it law.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Irvine-based New Century Financial Corp., the biggest sub-prime lender in bankruptcy proceedings, asked a judge to keep secret a report on whether the company wrongly spent cash set aside as collateral. The report by bankruptcy examiner Michael Missal contains information protected by attorney-client privilege, New Century lawyers said in court papers filed Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2013 | By Paul Pringle and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Government overseers of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum entered into a sweeping secrecy agreement requested by USC to keep under wraps their negotiations to surrender control of the taxpayer-owned venue to the private university, a top stadium official testified Thursday. John Sandbrook, the stadium's interim general manager, said USC administrators drafted the confidentiality pact and had it signed by him and three members of the Coliseum Commission, including Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Don't be fooled by its deceptively simple title or the hesitant, unassuming way it begins. Writer-director Sarah Polley's "Stories We Tell" ends up an invigorating powerhouse of a personal documentary, adventurous and absolutely fascinating. Unexpectedly moving in unanticipated ways, this unusual film is a look at the complexities of one specific family's story as well as a broad examination of the interlocking nature of truth, secrecy and memory, not to mention the endless intricacies of human relationships.
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