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NATIONAL
March 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A group advocating transparency has released audio of Pfc. Bradley Manning reading his 35-page, handwritten statement about why he gave massive troves of secret government documents to the website WikiLeaks. Audio and transcript below. The Freedom of the Press Foundation, a nonprofit conglomerate of activists and journalists formed in December , released the audio Tuesday morning. Manning, 25, pleaded guilty in military court Feb. 28 to 10 criminal charges of misusing classified material, including unauthorized possession and willful communication of information from military databases.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
The story of Pfc. Bradley Manning is a grand personal tragedy with a small potential for a happy ending. On Wednesday, a military judge sentenced Manning to 35 years in prison for giving WikiLeaks some 750,000 classified military documents. On Thursday, Manning announced that he will begin living as a woman, and his name will be Chelsea Manning. Those two stark facts may seem unrelated, but they are deeply intertwined. “As I transition into this next phase of my life,” Manning wrote in a statement that Savannah Guthrie read on the "Today" show, "I want everyone to know the real me. I am Chelsea Manning.
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NEWS
January 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. college librarian harmed China's national security by taking large batches of secret documents out of the country and has confessed, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Tuesday. Song Yongyi, who worked at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania and had planned to become a U.S. citizen last September, was on a summer trip to China to collect source material on the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution. Police detained him and his wife in August but allowed her to return to the United States in November.
NATIONAL
August 16, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - For decades, it was the U.S. government's Cold War-era secret that hid in plain sight, the 1000-pound elephant in the Nevada desert that Washington continually denied - "What test site?" - and the rest of the country turned into a breeding ground for conspiracy theories. Well, now it's official: Area 51 really does exist. In newly declassified documents, the Central Intelligence Agency is acknowledging the existence of the mysterious war-test site in central Nevada that has captivated listeners on the far ends of the radio dial, spawning endless speculation about UFO landings and top-secret aliens.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You need to hang (hang without fail, so that the public sees) at least 100 notorious kulaks, the rich, and the bloodsuckers. "Publish their names. Take away all of their grain. Execute the hostages. "This needs to be accomplished in such a way, that people for hundreds of miles around will see, tremble, know and scream out: let's choke and strangle those blood-sucking kulaks." --Vladimir I. Lenin, 1918 The order by Russian Communist leader Vladimir I.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | Associated Press
The trial of ex-White House aide Oliver L. North was postponed today until after the presidential election to give lawyers more time to study hundreds of thousands of top-secret documents. The decision by U.S. District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell canceling the Sept. 20 date means that the first criminal trial arising from the Iran-Contra affair won't be held while Vice President George Bush campaigns for the presidency.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush acceded Wednesday to a Senate demand and ordered the release of secret documents dating back to the Vietnam War on Americans missing in action. The President issued an order to all executive departments and agencies to make available all documents and files except for those that would invade the personal privacy of people involved. Earlier this month, the Senate unanimously demanded the release of the secret documents "expeditiously." At the time, Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1985 | JOEL SAPPELL and ROBERT WELKOS, Times Staff Writers
In one of the largest court demonstrations in Los Angeles in years, about 1,500 Church of Scientology members crammed three floors of the County Courthouse on Monday, effectively blocking public access to documents that the church considers secret and sacred. For hours, Scientologists swamped workers in the clerk's office with hundreds of requests to photocopy the documents, which reveal some of the organization's most fundamental beliefs.
NEWS
July 7, 1988
Fired White House aide Oliver L. North and his defense lawyers attended a closed hearing to argue their requests to use secret documents as evidence in the Iran-Contra conspiracy case. The hearing before U.S. District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell was closed both to the public and to prosecutors, to protect the secrecy of the documents and North's defense strategy.
NEWS
June 18, 1986
Jurors in the espionage retrial of former FBI agent Richard W. Miller ended a second day of deliberations without reaching a verdict. Miller, 49, is charged with espionage and bribery for allegedly passing secret documents to Soviet agents. His first trial ended in a hung jury in November.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A group advocating transparency has released audio of Pfc. Bradley Manning reading his 35-page, handwritten statement about why he gave massive troves of secret government documents to the website WikiLeaks. Audio and transcript below. The Freedom of the Press Foundation, a nonprofit conglomerate of activists and journalists formed in December , released the audio Tuesday morning. Manning, 25, pleaded guilty in military court Feb. 28 to 10 criminal charges of misusing classified material, including unauthorized possession and willful communication of information from military databases.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Army Pfc. Bradley Edward Manning pleaded guilty Thursday to 10 charges that he illegally acquired and transferred U.S. government secrets, agreeing to serve 20 years in prison for leaking classified material to WikiLeaks that described U.S. military and diplomatic efforts in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the globe. The 25-year-old soldier, however, pleaded not guilty to 12 more serious charges, including  espionage for aiding the enemy, meaning that his criminal case will go forward at a general court-martial in June.
WORLD
July 10, 2011 | By Alexandra Jinjikhashvili and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
The personal photographer for Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili and two others were charged Saturday with spying for Russia, officials said, as a cold war between the two countries showed no signs of abating. Saakashvili photographer Irakli Gedenidze, Foreign Ministry photographer Giorgi Abdaladze and European Pressphoto Agency photographer Zurab Kurtsikidze had been arrested Thursday. Their lawyers said Saturday that the espionage trial may start as early as Sept. 1. Russia and Georgia, a former Soviet republic, fought a brief war in August 2008, and diplomatic relations between the two countries have been severed since then.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2010 | By David G. Savage and Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
The publication this week of classified military reports from Afghanistan has brought home to the nation's capital what Hollywood has seen of late with the raw tapes of Mel Gibson's angry voice: the Internet has fundamentally transformed how secrets are disclosed. No longer can lawyers for the government or a big star rush to court or phone a top news executive to head off a damaging disclosure in a newspaper or on television. Now raw secrets can be posted online for all the world to see or hear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins
Navy officials in Port Hueneme inadvertently mailed the Social Security numbers and security classifications of more than 200 civilian employees to an engineer and two other employees accused of being security risks, according to the engineer, his attorney and a union representing government employees. Also mailed were several documents marked "secret" and "top secret," according to the engineer, Gary Biggers, and his attorney, Jack Futoran. Navy spokesman Darrell Waller said the documents "were inappropriately marked, but not by this command."
WORLD
April 10, 2009 | Henry Chu
Britain's top counter-terrorism official resigned Thursday after committing an embarrassing breach of security that forced police to prematurely launch raids against suspected Al Qaeda plotters. Bob Quick, an assistant commissioner at Scotland Yard, apologized for having potentially jeopardized "a major counter-terrorism operation" when he was photographed and filmed Wednesday carrying top-secret documents in plain view.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2009 | Washington Post
The International Committee of the Red Cross concluded in a secret report that the Bush administration's treatment of Al Qaeda captives "constituted torture," according to newly published excerpts from the long-concealed 2007 document. The report, an account of alleged physical and psychological brutality inside CIA "black site" prisons, also states that some U.S. practices amounted to "cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment." Such maltreatment is expressly prohibited by the Geneva Convention.
WORLD
February 5, 2009 | Henry Chu
Two of Britain's most senior judges accused the United States on Wednesday of having threatened to withhold intelligence from the British government if it released information about the alleged torture of a terrorism suspect currently being held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Binyam Mohammed, an Ethiopian resident of Britain, has alleged that he was tortured during interrogations by American, British and Pakistani security agents after being detained in Pakistan in 2002.
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