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Secret Police

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boris Gudz, 104, a veteran of the Soviet secret police who helped track down British spy Sydney Reilly in the early 1920s, died Wednesday in Moscow, said a spokesman for the Federal Security Service, or FSB. Born in 1902, Gudz joined the Bolshevik OGPU secret police in 1923, and in 1925 took part in its so-called Operation Trust, aimed at luring Reilly, a top British agent, to Russia to join an anti-Bolshevik organization that was in fact an OGPU trap.
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NEWS
October 4, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, the Bibi Saleh Center in downtown Kuwait city has been a haven for wealthy foreigners and Kuwaiti playboys and their girlfriends, a symbol of the oil-rich emirate's penchant for the pleasures of life. But in the two months since Iraq seized Kuwait, the four-towered condominium complex has become a cornerstone of Kuwait's brutal subjugation, according to reliable sources fleeing the country.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
East Germany's Parliament decided today to go out of business in a blaze of candor by revealing the names of lawmakers who worked for the Communist secret police. Soon afterward, Construction Minister Axel Viehweger resigned from the Cabinet of Prime Minister Lothar de Maiziere and admitted he had contacts to the former secret police under the old regime.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German opposition leaders threatened Monday to break off political talks with the Communists after rejecting assurances that the hated secret police have been disbanded. The opposition insisted that most of the secret police, the Stasi, are still at their posts around the nation even though the Communist government said two months ago that it would abolish the unit. The opposition leaders called on Prime Minister Hans Modrow to promise that the secret police will be disarmed and disbanded.
NEWS
February 8, 1985 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
A Polish court Thursday convicted four secret police officers of murdering one of the nation's most popular Roman Catholic priests but rejected death penalties and sentenced all four to long prison terms. Capt. Grzegorz Piotrowski, 33, described as the chief organizer of the killing, and Col. Adam Pietruszka, 47, the oldest of the accused men, were both sentenced to 25-year prison terms, the longest possible under Polish law.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret police serving fallen dictator Nicolae Ceausescu were deeply suspicious of new Romanian leader Ion Iliescu and his connections with the Soviet Union months before the popular uprising that toppled the regime, according to interviews with former political prisoners here.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Reuters
The trial of 21 former secret police and others opened today with the prosecution charging that, to cover up their crime, they stole and burned the corpses of 40 protesters they had killed. Local residents jeered the 21 defendants in this Transylvanian city, birthplace of the December revolution that swept dictator Nicolae Ceausescu from power in December.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of angry demonstrators stormed the headquarters of the state security police in East Berlin on Monday after officials disclosed the extent of the agency's spying on the people. They rifled the agency's files, sprayed paint in the corridors and hurled furniture from windows, the East German news agency ADN reported. Thousands shouting "We are the people!" were reported to have been involved. A television station reported that as many as 100,000 took part.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Gen. Manuel Contreras, the notorious chief of secret police in the 1970s, is finally behind bars. Officials said his imprisonment early Saturday, after months of delays and political tension, shows the Chilean army's subordination to democratic civilian rule. Contreras was convicted of ordering the 1976 assassination of Orlando Letelier, a prominent Chilean Socialist who was killed by a car bomb in Washington.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice has not quite caught up with retired army Gen. Manuel Contreras, chief of the notorious secret police under this nation's former military government. But an Italian court Friday increased his debt to society by 20 years. The court convicted and sentenced Contreras, in absentia, for ordering a 1975 attempt to kill an exiled Chilean politician in Rome.
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