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Secret Recipe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001
I don't know why the Col. Sanders people are worried about anyone knowing their secret recipe ("Couple Say They've Found KFC Recipe," Jan. 29). Everyone knows how to make a hamburger, but people still go to McDonald's. KURT SIPOLSKI Palm Desert
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 3, 2013 | Jonathan Gold
If you follow the peregrinations of local Chinese kitchens, you've probably been hearing a bit about Chengdu Taste lately, a new restaurant specializing in the dishes of its namesake city that was pretty much acclaimed as the best Sichuan restaurant in town from the first days of its opening. When I noted the unavailability of an appetizer translated as "Diced Rabbit With Younger Sister's Secret Recipe," the San Gabriel Valley cognoscenti knew what I was referring to even without a mention of the restaurant's name, and I was sent links to recipes, to articles noting the dish's ubiquity in Chengdu and a short biography of the woman who invented it. (According to Fuchsia Dunlop, second-sister rabbit cubes were popular enough to inspire a Chengdu poet to compose an ode in its honor.)
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BUSINESS
October 15, 1997 | KAREN E. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Q: I have developed my own recipes for certain foods that I would like to market. Is there a patent for a recipe? If not, how can someone protect a recipe? --Nestor C. Balila, Los Angeles A: It is possible to obtain a patent on a recipe, provided that you have some unique combination of elements. However, a better--and cheaper--way to protect it is by considering it a trade secret.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Roasted garlic: It's one of the most amazing flavors in the kitchen. Add it to soups and stews, whisk it into a vinaigrette or tomato sauce, brush it onto grilled steaks, use it to lend extra flavor to your secret recipe for mashed potatoes. Or simply rub it over toasted bread, like butter. If you've never roasted garlic before, I can't stress enough how easy it is. Grab a whole head of garlic (or two, or three) next time you're at the market. Cut the top of the pointy tip off the garlic (no peeling necessary!
FOOD
November 30, 2005 | Linda Burum, Special to The Times
THE Korean passion for octopus runs so deep that there is a whole street of restaurants specializing in dishes prepared with them in the Mu Gyo Dong nightlife area of Seoul. Here in Los Angeles, the love affair with tentacled cephalopods is in its infancy, but local Korean-octopus aficionados can find their heart's desire at new specialty restaurants springing up in and around Koreatown.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
GIVE US YOUR BEER Beer geeks have started a petition on the White House website asking that the secret recipe for the home-brewed White House Honey Ale (brewed with honey from the White House beehive) be released to the public. More than 3,000 people have signed so far, still short of the 25,000 signatures required by Sept. 17 to receive an official response. President Obama is the first president to brew beer in the White House. [ New York Times ] EGGPLANT JAM?
OPINION
July 9, 2006
AN ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT at Coca-Cola Co. and two accomplices smuggle out a secret formula -- not the secret formula, but close -- and try to sell it to PepsiCo Inc. Pepsi rats them out to Coke. Coke rats them out to the feds. The FBI launches a six-week sting operation. Coke might be the real thing, but the conspirators turn out to be anything but.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Roasted garlic: It's one of the most amazing flavors in the kitchen. Add it to soups and stews, whisk it into a vinaigrette or tomato sauce, brush it onto grilled steaks, use it to lend extra flavor to your secret recipe for mashed potatoes. Or simply rub it over toasted bread, like butter. If you've never roasted garlic before, I can't stress enough how easy it is. Grab a whole head of garlic (or two, or three) next time you're at the market. Cut the top of the pointy tip off the garlic (no peeling necessary!
FOOD
July 5, 1991
Here's a funny note to add to your article by Laurie Ochoa, "Pasquale Makes Dough," (June 20). About seven years ago my ex-partner and I searched the world to find the best pizza from the south of France to Italy to New York. Finally, I walked into Cafe Roma in Beverly Hills, and found the best pizza. I made a deal with Tony (Morra), Pasquale's brother, to become pizza chef at R.J., Newport Beach. We built a pizza oven that was fit for a king. About a week before opening, Tony told us he couldn't take the job, but his brother, Pasquale, was arriving from Naples.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's amazing how gossip and innuendo can distort truth. Take "Hansel and Gretel." Common belief holds that these two innocents were mistreated by their stepmother, starved, abandoned, then imprisoned by a cannibalistic witch. Now for the real story. It seems that if Hansel and Gretel's busy investment banker parents hadn't left them alone, the spoiled little snoops wouldn't have stumbled across the gingerbread retreat of one of TV's most celebrated cooking show hosts.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
GIVE US YOUR BEER Beer geeks have started a petition on the White House website asking that the secret recipe for the home-brewed White House Honey Ale (brewed with honey from the White House beehive) be released to the public. More than 3,000 people have signed so far, still short of the 25,000 signatures required by Sept. 17 to receive an official response. President Obama is the first president to brew beer in the White House. [ New York Times ] EGGPLANT JAM?
NEWS
August 10, 2006 | Mark Sachs
LATE-NIGHT cable fans can recite his taglines like something out of a Schwarzenegger flick: "The only tears you'll shed will be tears of joy." "But wait, there's more." And the hands-down fave: "Set it -- and forget it." In the three-easy-payments world of infomercial pitchmen, Ron Popeil is the gold standard. The Biography Channel gives the 71-year-old Beverly Hills resident his due Tuesday at 5 p.m. (repeating at 9) -- an hourlong special on Popeil's remarkable Ronco rise.
OPINION
July 9, 2006
AN ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT at Coca-Cola Co. and two accomplices smuggle out a secret formula -- not the secret formula, but close -- and try to sell it to PepsiCo Inc. Pepsi rats them out to Coke. Coke rats them out to the feds. The FBI launches a six-week sting operation. Coke might be the real thing, but the conspirators turn out to be anything but.
FOOD
November 30, 2005 | Linda Burum, Special to The Times
THE Korean passion for octopus runs so deep that there is a whole street of restaurants specializing in dishes prepared with them in the Mu Gyo Dong nightlife area of Seoul. Here in Los Angeles, the love affair with tentacled cephalopods is in its infancy, but local Korean-octopus aficionados can find their heart's desire at new specialty restaurants springing up in and around Koreatown.
NEWS
September 10, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only people in the dingy New Wind Restaurant at lunchtime are the cooks, who are playing cards. Asked about the restaurant's specialties, owner Ding Huang skips the sales pitch with a curt: "It's Chinese food." Across the parking lot, smiling hostesses, "flowers," as they are known, welcome a steady stream of customers to KFC. Cash registers ring up a sale every 90 seconds in the two-story air-conditioned restaurant.
MAGAZINE
July 29, 2001 | LOU MATHEWS, Lou Mathews last wrote about chiles rellenos for the magazine
My grandmother, Eda Peyton, was often described by my grandfather as "a good plain cook." Lawrence G. Peyton had his blind spots. He was a founding member of California's Condor Society, a renowned amateur ornithologist who was the last person to legally collect a condor egg--it was for the Museum of Science and Industry--spoke Spanish in his sleep and made a living as an orange grower for 60 years, while saddled with ne'er-do-well relatives. But he was wrong about his wife's cooking talent.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | ROY RIVENBURG
Something About Mary: One of the biggest mysteries left over from the previous century (aside from why anyone ever let Pauly Shore have a career) is: What is the third secret of Fatima? For those unfamiliar with the story, in 1917 the Virgin Mary appeared to three shepherd children in Fatima, Portugal, and delivered three messages, or secrets. The first was a prophecy that World War I would end but be followed by a bigger conflict.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1985
The Atlanta beverage maker confirmed that it will sweeten the taste of its 99-year-old flagship cola and also Diet Coke. Coke said it will start shipping the new product to stores about May 8. The new cola will come in slightly redesigned cans accented by a silver stripe with the exclamation NEW at the top of the can. The new products will be backed by an advertising campaign that will de-emphasize Coke's marketing strategy of berating Pepsi for being too sweet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001
I don't know why the Col. Sanders people are worried about anyone knowing their secret recipe ("Couple Say They've Found KFC Recipe," Jan. 29). Everyone knows how to make a hamburger, but people still go to McDonald's. KURT SIPOLSKI Palm Desert
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | ROY RIVENBURG
Something About Mary: One of the biggest mysteries left over from the previous century (aside from why anyone ever let Pauly Shore have a career) is: What is the third secret of Fatima? For those unfamiliar with the story, in 1917 the Virgin Mary appeared to three shepherd children in Fatima, Portugal, and delivered three messages, or secrets. The first was a prophecy that World War I would end but be followed by a bigger conflict.
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