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NATIONAL
April 20, 2012 | By David Horsey
We have learned a secret of the Secret Service: At least a few of those tight-lipped tough guys are not quite as straight-laced and serious as they appear to be. In fact, they apparently love to party like frat boys. Three Secret Service agents have already lost their jobs after it was revealed that 11 agents and 10 U.S. military personnel engaged the services of as many as 20 prostitutes in one wild night while they were doing advance work for President Obama's visit to Colombia. According to preliminary reports, the dusk-to-dawn drunken sex spree came to light when one of the women - who insisted that she was a high-paid call girl, not a common street hooker - got upset when one agent refused to pay her a fee worthy of her status.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- Investigators reviewing allegations of misbehavior by Secret Service agents tasked with safeguarding the president and other top administration officials found no evidence that “misconduct is widespread” or that the agency's leadership “tolerates inappropriate behavior.” However, the investigation by the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general, launched after several agents were caught in 2012 with Colombian prostitutes,...
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NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By James Oliphant
When the U.S. Secret Service decided to order two custom-made buses, including the one that transported President Obama through the upper Midwest this week, they had a specific model in mind.  The service, which has been transporting protectees by bus since Ronald Reagan's 1980 campaign, wanted a particular model only available from the Quebec-based manufacturer Prevost.  “The vehicle had to support the weight of security and communication equipment...
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- The White House is resuming public tours on a limited schedule after stopping the popular tourist draw when budget cuts hit federal agencies in March. A scaled-back schedule of tours will begin Nov. 5, the White House said in a statement. Member of Congress, who request tickets on behalf of constituents, were also notified of the decision Friday. The tours through the East Wing and the executive residence were stopped in March, when across-the-board spending cuts forced federal agencies to immediately slash a total of $85 billion from the budgets.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The man who shot Ronald Reagan and three other men in 1981 has been behaving normally when he leaves the mental hospital in Washington, D.C., where he is being treated, according to Secret Service observations in newly released court documents. John Hinckley Jr., 57, shops at Wal-Mart, Target and PetSmart during visits to his mother's home in Williamsburg, Va. One of his first stops is often a Wendy's. At home with his mother, he performs lots of chores, plays guitar and makes art. He shows few of the symptoms that led to the 1982 finding that he was insane, and therefore not guilty of attempted murder and other charges in the assassination attempt.
OPINION
May 3, 2012 | By Gregory J. Wallance
The great irony of the Secret Service sex scandal is that for many decades its agents had protected presidents and senior officials from scandal over sexual trysts and romantic affairs - indeed, often discreetly facilitating them - only to embarrass itself in a hotel in Cartagena, Colombia. The 12 Secret Service employees being investigated for cavorting with at least 20 prostitutes last month were in Colombia to prepare for President Obama's arrival for the Summit of the Americas.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Twitter users sent more than 6.5 million Tweets during the third presidential debate Monday - and a few of them were death threats against President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Less than 24 hours later, the Secret Service took to Twitter in what the department calls a new tactic to gather information on potential threats against the people they protect. “To report a tweet that concerns you,” @SecretService wrote Tuesday in its first such Tweet , “call the nearest field office in your state.” The agency posted a similar message Wednesday morning.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Danielle Ryan
WASHINGTON -- The House has voted to give lifelong Secret Service protection to former presidents and their wives, due to increased national security threats posed post-Sept. 11. The bill passed Wednesday morning by voice vote. The bill's sponsor, Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.), said in a statement that “the increased mobility and youth” of still-living former presidents added to the necessity of the extension. The measure, which now goes to the Senate, would reverse a 1994 law limiting Secret Service protection to 10 years after a president leaves office.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- Investigators reviewing allegations of misbehavior by Secret Service agents tasked with safeguarding the president and other top administration officials found no evidence that “misconduct is widespread” or that the agency's leadership “tolerates inappropriate behavior.” However, the investigation by the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general, launched after several agents were caught in 2012 with Colombian prostitutes,...
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - More resignations are expected soon in the Secret Service prostitution scandal. "It is our understanding the resignations could come today or tomorrow," Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said Thursday. He has been briefed by Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan. The Secret Service announced Wednesday that it was seeking to fire one supervisor tied to the alleged misconduct. Another supervisor is retiring, and a third agent will be allowed to retire.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano and Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- The woman shot to death after a police chase from the White House to Capitol Hill had been suffering from mental health issues, according to federal law enforcement officials, including postpartum depression after her daughter was born and a troubling fixation on President Obama. Miriam Carey's declining mental stability, the sources said, developed into a belief that the president was “controlling" her life, which may explain why she appeared Thursday afternoon next to the White House and then led Secret Service agents and Washington police on a two-mile, three-minute chase down Pennsylvania Avenue.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Michael A. Memoli, Lisa Mascaro and David Lauter, This post has been updated. See below for details.
WASHINGTON -- A driver who appears to have tried to ram her car through security barriers near the White House was shot and killed by police outside the U.S. Capitol on Thursday afternoon, law enforcement officials said. Two police officers, one from the Secret Service and the other from the U.S. Capitol Police, were injured in the incident, both apparently from car crashes. Both are in good condition, officials said. A 1-year old child who was in the car is also in good condition and was taken into protective custody, officials said.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The official in charge of investigating potential misdeeds at the Department of Homeland Security is under investigation on allegations of nepotism, abusing his position and covering up details about a Secret Service prostitution scandal. Senate investigators are looking into allegations that Deputy Inspector Gen. Charles K. Edwards was "susceptible to political pressure" and that he changed and withheld information for reports on the misconduct of U.S. Secret Service agents who hired prostitutes in Cartagena, Colombia, during a visit before a 2012 presidential trip, according to a letter two senators sent to Edwards on June 27. "Numerous" complaints from fellow employees allege that Edwards improperly employed his wife, Madhuri Edwards, as a supervisory auditor in his office, that he arranged for her to telecommute from India for seven months, and that he took "retaliatory action" against people who objected, according to the letter from Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat who chairs the oversight subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, and the subcommittee's top Republican, Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum and Andrew Blankstein
Secret Service officials in town for Friday's visit of President Obama said they are aware of the shooting at Santa Monica College, but do not expect it to affect his trip. "We are aware of the incident and it is not impacting the visit," said Ed Donovan, a spokesman for the Secret Service. "It's a local police matter at this point. " Obama landed at LAX shortly before 11 a.m. and flew by helicopter to Santa Monica Airport, where he was greeted on the Tarmac by  the outgoing and incoming mayors of Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa and Eric Garcetti.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- An envelope addressed to President Obama and intercepted at a mail processing facility has tested positive for the poison ricin, a law enforcement official said Wednesday. Officials are conducting additional tests to confirm the result, said the official, who was not authorized to speak to the press because the tests are part of an ongoing investigation. Investigators believe the letter to the White House may have been sent by the same person who mailed a suspicious envelope to Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.)
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- President Obama has called officials in Boston to offer “whatever assistance is necessary” to investigate and respond to the deadly bomb blasts Monday and plans to speak publicly on the incident this evening, a senior White House official said. Shortly after hearing of the bombs just minutes after they went off, Obama called the Boston mayor and Massachusetts governor to express his concern for the injured to “make clear that his administration is ready to provide needed support,” the official said.
NEWS
November 16, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The U.S. Secret Service said Wednesday that a suspect potentially tied to a shooting incident near the White House on Friday has been arrested in Pennsylvania. According to a statement from the agency, Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, 21, was apprehended by Pennsylvania state troopers at a hotel in Indiana, Pa., at 12:35 p.m. EST based on information generated by Secret Service agents in the Pittsburgh field office. The Secret Service, ATF, FBI, U.S. Park Police and the Washington Metropolitan Police Department had been working together to locate Ortega-Hernandez after law enforcement Friday responded to the sound of gunfire on Constitution Avenue, approximately 700 yards south of the White House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998
Most of us believe the president wants the Secret Service to keep the service a secret. HAL ROTHBERG Woodland Hills
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The man who shot Ronald Reagan and three other men in 1981 has been behaving normally when he leaves the mental hospital in Washington, D.C., where he is being treated, according to Secret Service observations in newly released court documents. John Hinckley Jr., 57, shops at Wal-Mart, Target and PetSmart during visits to his mother's home in Williamsburg, Va. One of his first stops is often a Wendy's. At home with his mother, he performs lots of chores, plays guitar and makes art. He shows few of the symptoms that led to the 1982 finding that he was insane, and therefore not guilty of attempted murder and other charges in the assassination attempt.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Tuesday named a high-ranking career employee of the U.S. Secret Service to become its first female director. Julia A. Pierson, a veteran of the agency's Miami and Orlando, Fla., field offices, serves as chief of staff of the law enforcement agency that is best known for protecting the U.S. president. As Obama puts together his team for the second term, Pierson is the first woman he has appointed to head a national security agency. Obama faced some criticism when he named men to head three of the most high-profile departments:  the Pentagon, the State Department and the CIA. PHOTOS: Supreme Court considers gay marriage He has, however, named a number of new female appointees, including Sally Jewell to head Interior, Gina McCarthy to be the Environmental Protection Agency administrator, Mary Jo White to chair the Securities and Exchange Commission and Sylvia Mathews Burwell to be director of the Office of Management and Budget.
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