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NEWS
December 13, 1988
A federal judge refused to stop random drug testing of uniformed Secret Service agents. U.S. District Judge Thomas A. Flannery denied a motion by a public employees' union for a preliminary injunction, noting that other courts have refused to halt ongoing drug-testing programs while the question of their legality is pending. Flannery did not rule on the merits of the challenge, saying he would issue an opinion within a week.
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NATIONAL
April 16, 2008 | DeeDee Correll, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dick Cheney does not have to testify as an eyewitness in a civil lawsuit filed against Secret Service agents by a man who says he was wrongfully arrested for criticizing the vice president -- at least not yet, U.S. District Magistrate Judge Craig Shaffer ruled Tuesday.
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NEWS
May 11, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Score one for the common man--Michael S. Dukakis has convinced the Secret Service to let him keep his tomato patch. When Secret Service agents board Dukakis' plane today for a campaign swing to New Jersey, Oregon and California, it will mark the end of a months-long debate in which the Massachusetts governor stubbornly resisted entreaties by his staff and his wife, Kitty, to accept bodyguards.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Secret Service expects to borrow more than 2,000 immigration officers and federal airport screeners next year to help guard an ever-expanding field of presidential candidates. It also expects to shift 250 of its own agents from investigations to security details. The agency has a $110-million budget for campaign protection. It spent a record $65 million for the 2004 election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001 | RICHARD FAUSSET and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As CEO of one of L.A.'s few prop companies that prints dummy currency for the movies, Gregg H. Bilson Jr. walks a fine line between counterfeiting laws and producers' demands for the most realistic bills possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the illicit relationship with his best friend's 16-year-old daughter was discovered--an affair that led to his conviction Friday on sex and drug charges--U.S. Secret Service Agent Timothy John O'Brien lived the good life. At work, he had reached the top rungs of his profession--the presidential detail. O'Brien was assigned to protect the Bel-Air home of former President Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy.
NEWS
July 8, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a significant victory for independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, an appellate court ruled Tuesday that Secret Service employees must tell the Monica S. Lewinsky grand jury what they saw or learned of President Clinton's relationship with the former White House intern.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a "highly unusual" move, independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr began bringing Secret Service and other witnesses before two different grand juries meeting simultaneously on Thursday. That witnesses were being ushered before separate grand juries, both meeting on the third floor of the federal courthouse here, was the strongest indication yet that Starr is dramatically picking up the pace of his six-month investigation of President Clinton's relationship with former White House intern Monica S.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Sitting on a desk in a government office, it hardly looked like the paraphernalia for stealing $14 million from automated teller machines across the country. U.S. Secret Service agents say, however, that the IBM personal computer, encoding machine, poster board, paper cutter, glue and roll of magnetic tape could have been used to pull off the biggest ATM heist ever. "This one could have worked real well," said Richard J. Griffin, head of the Secret Service office in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man already serving life in prison for a triple murder was sentenced Tuesday to death in the shotgun slaying of Julie Cross, the only female Secret Service agent to die in the line of duty. After handing down the sentence, Superior Court Judge Charles Horan ordered the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department to deliver Andre Alexander, 44, to San Quentin's death row within 10 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2004 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
It is an Angeleno's dream: cruising down the Harbor Freeway during rush hour, all seven lanes of traffic completely cleared in your direction, jealous commuters on the other side of the divider barely inching forward. That was the reality when the president visited Los Angeles in March. The regular rules of the road also are suspended for presidential candidates, the vice president and foreign heads of state. Last week, evening rush-hour traffic was parted for Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001 | RICHARD FAUSSET and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As CEO of one of L.A.'s few prop companies that prints dummy currency for the movies, Gregg H. Bilson Jr. walks a fine line between counterfeiting laws and producers' demands for the most realistic bills possible.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight current or former Secret Service agents who are black charged Wednesday that top officials are dragging their feet on ridding the agency of deep-rooted racial discrimination, which they said has also infected Vice President Al Gore's protective detail. The group, among 38 African American agents who so far have filed sworn declarations in federal court, appealed to Gore for help in getting the service to sit down with them to discuss a class-action lawsuit filed in May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scrambling to respond to a federal court order invalidating their security plan, the Los Angeles Police Department, U.S. Secret Service and other agencies said Thursday they are weighing options that would put protesters closer to delegates and might force the deployment of hundreds of additional officers.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | From Bloomberg News Service
Black U.S. Secret Service agents filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday accusing their employer, the Treasury Department, of discriminating against them for more than two decades. The bodyguards, who protect the president and other top officials, said that since 1974, they have been victims of racial bias through the agency's employment practices, mainly by being passed up for promotions. The agents also said colleagues subjected them to repeated racial slurs.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yvette Summerour decided at the age of 6 that she would become a Secret Service agent when she saw her mother crying as she ironed clothes and watched President Kennedy's funeral on television. Now the longest-tenured African American woman in the Secret Service, Summerour on Thursday reluctantly joined two other black agents in a discrimination complaint against the agency. Passed over at least five times for promotion, she said, she regrets having to denounce the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years after the murder of Julie Cross--the only female Secret Service agent to die in the line of duty--the Los Angeles district attorney's office filed murder charges Thursday against a convicted triple murderer serving a life sentence in state prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1995 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal agents say the computer hacker called "Alpha Bits" was looking to sell stolen cellular phone account information when he ventured into "Celco 51," an Internet bulletin board that veteran cyber-crooks treated as an on-line black market. "Celco 51" was known as the place to sell ill-gotten credit card numbers and cellular phone accounts, all from the comfort of your home computer, authorities allege.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A small New Hampshire company that wants to build a national database of driver's license photos got nearly $1.5 million in funds from the Secret Service last year, according to sources. Congressional leaders envisioned using the photo file to combat terrorism, immigration abuses and other identity crimes. Image Data LLC said the database would only be used to prevent check and credit card fraud. The Nashua, N.H.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | Times Wire Services
U.S. Secret Service Director Lewis Merletti is going from watching the Top Dog to keeping an eye on Big Dawg. The Clinton White House's top Secret Service man is leaving his job in Washington to join the reincarnation of the Cleveland Browns as the NFL expansion team's vice president and director of stadium and security affairs.
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