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NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Two more Secret Service employees have resigned and another two have been cleared as part of the ongoing prostitution scandal investigation. According to the agency, the actions Tuesday bring to eight the number of employees who have resigned or left the agency for alleged misconduct in Cartagena, Colombia, ahead of President Obama's arrival for an international summit April 13. Three employees have now been cleared of serious misconduct but...
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2012 | By Katherine Skiba, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Senate Homeland Security Committee will hold public hearings on the Secret Service sex scandal, Chairman Joe Lieberman said Sunday, to explore whether the incident in Colombia was isolated and what rules govern the conduct of agents who are on assignment but off-duty. "From what we know about what happened in Cartagena, they were not acting like Secret Service agents," Lieberman (I-Conn.) told "Fox News Sunday. " "They were acting like a bunch of college students away on spring weekend.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
WASHINGTON -- An internal review found no evidence that White House staff members engaged in "improper conduct" in Cartagena, Colombia, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said. Carney said the Office of White House Counsel conducted the review of White House staff members "out of due diligence" and not in response to a "specific credible allegation. " The Colombian prostitution scandal has consumed much of Washington for more than a week and led to rampant speculation, as reports of heavy drinking and hard partying among a Secret Service and military advance team have leaked out.   "There is no indication that the White House advance team engaged in any improper conduct or behavior," Carney said.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Katherine Skiba
WASHINGTON - Topic A on Sunday's talk shows was federal employees behaving badly, with most outcry over the Secret Service agents ensnared in a prostitution scandal in Colombia. But criticism also mounted for the General Services Administration, caught in its own brouhaha over extravagant spending at a Las Vegas conference and other venues. Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), who chairs the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, said the GSA's lavish spending in Las Vegas was “really outrageous” and “sickening” because it didn't represent most people who work for the federal government.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Katherine Skiba
WASHINGTON - In the aftermath of the Secret Service sex scandal in Colombia, Sen. Joe Lieberman said Sunday that the Homeland Security Committee he chairs would send questions to the agency this week and hold public hearings to explore questions such as whether the case was isolated and what rules govern the conduct of agents who are on assignment but off-duty. “From what we know about what happened in Cartagena, they were not acting like Secret Service agents,” said Lieberman (I-Conn.)
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
? Three more Secret Service employees who were involved in the Colombian prostitution scandal are leaving the agency, bringing the total to a half-dozen agents or uniformed officers who saw their careers cut short in a widening investigation of alleged misconduct. The latest casualties of the embarrassing episode "have chosen to resign," according to Paul Morrissey, spokesman for the Secret Service. He also announced that a 12th agency employee is being investigated, one more than previously known.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - Three more Secret Service employees who were involved in the Colombian prostitution scandal are leaving the agency, bringing the total to half a dozen agents or uniformed officers who saw their careers cut short in a widening investigation of alleged misconduct. The latest casualties of the embarrassing episode “have chosen to resign,” said Paul Morrissey, spokesman for the Secret Service. He also announced that a 12th agency employee is being investigated, one more than previously known.
OPINION
April 20, 2012
Who's watching? Re "3 Secret Service agents dismissed in prostitution scandal," April 19 It's nobody's business what others do behind their bedroom doors. If they're employees and their extracurricular activities do not diminish their on-the-job performance, then I don't give a hoot. In the case of the Secret Service agents implicated in the prostitution scandal in Colombia, it's what's between their ears that is in question, not what they do in bed. The real message in all of this is that some in the media and President Obama's opponents are undoubtedly investing great sums of time and money to convince people that these events are somehow reasons that he should not be reelected.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2012 | By David Horsey
We have learned a secret of the Secret Service: At least a few of those tight-lipped tough guys are not quite as straight-laced and serious as they appear to be. In fact, they apparently love to party like frat boys. Three Secret Service agents have already lost their jobs after it was revealed that 11 agents and 10 U.S. military personnel engaged the services of as many as 20 prostitutes in one wild night while they were doing advance work for President Obama's visit to Colombia. According to preliminary reports, the dusk-to-dawn drunken sex spree came to light when one of the women - who insisted that she was a high-paid call girl, not a common street hooker - got upset when one agent refused to pay her a fee worthy of her status.
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