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Secret Sunshine

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May 15, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
For nearly three decades, Yun Jung-hee was one of the brightest lights in Korean cinema. She made her feature debut in 1967's "Sorrowful Youth," then went on to appear in nearly 300 films, amassing a reputation as possibly the greatest actress in the nation's history. Since she announced her retirement in 1994 after completing the film "Two Flags" — Yun married pianist Kun-woo Paik and together they raised a daughter in Paris — cinéastes have been clamoring for her return. Yun, now 66, concedes that she too was perhaps just waiting for the right role.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
For nearly three decades, Yun Jung-hee was one of the brightest lights in Korean cinema. She made her feature debut in 1967's "Sorrowful Youth," then went on to appear in nearly 300 films, amassing a reputation as possibly the greatest actress in the nation's history. Since she announced her retirement in 1994 after completing the film "Two Flags" — Yun married pianist Kun-woo Paik and together they raised a daughter in Paris — cinéastes have been clamoring for her return. Yun, now 66, concedes that she too was perhaps just waiting for the right role.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tony Leung Chiu-wai won the best actor award Monday at the second Asian Film Awards in Hong Kong for his performance in the Ang Lee spy thriller "Lust, Caution." The big winner, however, was "Secret Sunshine," the South Korean story of a widow's mental breakdown, which captured awards as best movie, best director for Lee Chang-dong and best actress for Jeon Do-yeon. The role earlier earned Jeon acting honors at the Cannes Film Festival. Best supporting actress went to veteran Joan Chen for "The Sun Also Rises," and China's Sun Hong-lei won best supporting actor for "Mongol."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Poetry" is daring in the ways only quiet, unhurried but finally haunting films have the courage to be. A character study of remarkable subtlety joined to a carefully worked-out plot that fearlessly explores big issues like beauty, truth and mortality, it marks the further emergence of Korean writer-director Lee Chang-dong. Lee's script for this film took the best screenplay prize at Cannes last year, and his previous directing effort, 2008's "Secret Sunshine," won the festival's best actress award for Jeon Do-yeon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008
Director Lee Chang-Dong has worn many hats in his life -- high school teacher, novelist, actor and South Korean minister of culture and tourism from 2002 to 2004 -- but it's the art of storytelling to which he gives the most credit. "All of my experience built who I am today, but my experience as a writer influenced how I view this world and people's lives," Lee says. "It helped me realize things beyond their physical existence." Lee, who counts John Cassavetes as his favorite director, will be honored at LACMA this week with screenings of his four features, closing with "Secret Sunshine," whose star Jeon Do-Yeon won the best actress prize at Cannes last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Poetry" is daring in the ways only quiet, unhurried but finally haunting films have the courage to be. A character study of remarkable subtlety joined to a carefully worked-out plot that fearlessly explores big issues like beauty, truth and mortality, it marks the further emergence of Korean writer-director Lee Chang-dong. Lee's script for this film took the best screenplay prize at Cannes last year, and his previous directing effort, 2008's "Secret Sunshine," won the festival's best actress award for Jeon Do-yeon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Associated Press
The New York Film Festival will open with Wes Anderson's "The Darjeeling Limited" and honor the Coen brothers' "No Country for Old Men" as its centerpiece in a particularly American slate for the internationally-minded festival. The Film Society of Lincoln Center, which produces the festival, announced the opening and centerpiece films Thursday, but not the closing movie. The 45th annual festival runs from Sept. 28 to Oct. 14.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
HONG KONG -- Ang Lee's spy thriller "Lust, Caution" and Peter Chan's historical epic "The Warlords" led with six nominations each in the shortlist for the second Asian Film Awards announced Thursday. Other top contenders include Jiang Wen's "The Sun Also Rises," with five nominations. The Japanese movie "I Just Didn't Do It" and South Korea's "Secret Sunshine" each had four in the event organized by the Hong Kong International Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Over the last decade writer-director Lee Chang-dong has emerged not only as a major force in the revitalized Korean cinema landscape but also as a world-class filmmaker who puts his characters through profoundly harrowing experiences that reveal the workings of human nature and society.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | Sheigh Crabtree, Times Staff Writer
The 2007 Oscar awards season has officially begun. The Telluride Film Festival, the Colorado celluloid fete that serves as an intimate family reunion for cinephiles and a launching pad for specialty-film Oscar campaigns, unveiled its 34th annual lineup Thursday. The four-day event in the San Juan Mountains will include 33 new feature films, 15 revivals and 16 new short films beginning this evening and wrapping up Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tony Leung Chiu-wai won the best actor award Monday at the second Asian Film Awards in Hong Kong for his performance in the Ang Lee spy thriller "Lust, Caution." The big winner, however, was "Secret Sunshine," the South Korean story of a widow's mental breakdown, which captured awards as best movie, best director for Lee Chang-dong and best actress for Jeon Do-yeon. The role earlier earned Jeon acting honors at the Cannes Film Festival. Best supporting actress went to veteran Joan Chen for "The Sun Also Rises," and China's Sun Hong-lei won best supporting actor for "Mongol."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008
Director Lee Chang-Dong has worn many hats in his life -- high school teacher, novelist, actor and South Korean minister of culture and tourism from 2002 to 2004 -- but it's the art of storytelling to which he gives the most credit. "All of my experience built who I am today, but my experience as a writer influenced how I view this world and people's lives," Lee says. "It helped me realize things beyond their physical existence." Lee, who counts John Cassavetes as his favorite director, will be honored at LACMA this week with screenings of his four features, closing with "Secret Sunshine," whose star Jeon Do-Yeon won the best actress prize at Cannes last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Win Win 20th Century Fox, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 Writer-director Tom McCarthy's "Win Win" is a wonderfully acted sports drama that hits all its expected beats with confidence. Paul Giamatti plays a small-town New Jersey attorney having trouble both with his practice and with the high school wrestling team he coaches. Then he takes on the well-paying guardianship of one of his elderly clients, and learns that the client has a grandson who's a championship-caliber wrestler. McCarthy doesn't do anything exceptional with this story, yet "Win Win" is hard to dislike, in part because McCarthy knows how to make his "schlub succeeds" stories go down easy, and in even larger part because Giamatti is so terrific as a decent man in over his head.
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