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Secret Weapon

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SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
Yasiel Puig has been a sensation. Matt Kemp, maybe baseball's best player two years ago, is back from injury. Adrian Gonzalez galvanizes the Latino fan base and leads the team in homers an RBIs. Andre Ethier is called a team savior. Then there's Hanley Ramirez. A player who won a batting title, is a three-time all-star, is a former National League rookie of the year and is in the prime of his career. And he's being overlooked? Yeah, kind of. Compared with Puig captivating the sporting world and the adulation thrown at Kemp, the attention hasn't exactly been heaped on Ramirez.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"Dallas Buyers Club" star Matthew McConaughey went to great lengths to get into character as Ron Woodroof, the real-life Texas electrician who became an unlikely AIDS activist after being diagnosed with HIV in the mid-1980s. McConaughey shed more than 40 pounds and pored over 16-plus hours of interview tapes, for example. At a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series , the actor talked about his preparation and what his "secret weapon" was. McConaughey's first resource was the cache of tapes that screenwriter Craig Borten recorded with Woodroof months before Woodroof's death in 1992.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Whoops - Kanye West went and started a feud with someone who has a powerful weapon apparently not possessed by the volatile rapper: a sense of humor. Guess who won? West took a shot at online shoe retailer Zappos during a Tuesday podcast with Bret Easton Ellis that touched on topics ranging from film to fashion, E! News reported. During the chat, West slammed Zappos' chief exec, Tony Hsieh. "I got into this giant argument with the head of Zappos that he's trying to tell me what I need to focus on," West said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Whoops - Kanye West went and started a feud with someone who has a powerful weapon apparently not possessed by the volatile rapper: a sense of humor. Guess who won? West took a shot at online shoe retailer Zappos during a Tuesday podcast with Bret Easton Ellis that touched on topics ranging from film to fashion, E! News reported. During the chat, West slammed Zappos' chief exec, Tony Hsieh. "I got into this giant argument with the head of Zappos that he's trying to tell me what I need to focus on," West said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
So, let's see if we've got this straight. When Ja'Nel is on the red team, the team racks up an unbelievable winning streak, taking home the trophy for every single challenge -- save one. And when she gets switched over the the blue team, lo and behold, they turn their losing streak around by nailing the relay challenge. Is Ja'Nel the one to beat? Perhaps, if she can stay out of the way of flying lobster. And perhaps, unless we find out this has all been crafty editing and one of the other competitors -- Mary, maybe?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"Dallas Buyers Club" star Matthew McConaughey went to great lengths to get into character as Ron Woodroof, the real-life Texas electrician who became an unlikely AIDS activist after being diagnosed with HIV in the mid-1980s. McConaughey shed more than 40 pounds and pored over 16-plus hours of interview tapes, for example. At a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series , the actor talked about his preparation and what his "secret weapon" was. McConaughey's first resource was the cache of tapes that screenwriter Craig Borten recorded with Woodroof months before Woodroof's death in 1992.
MAGAZINE
October 18, 1998 | Julie Logan
There's something going around at Creative Artists Agency, and the bug can be traced to the Wilshire Boulevard penthouse suite of a Beverly Hills dermatologist. Here, beyond the bric-a-brac of his more-is-more waiting room decor, Dr. Harold Lancer fills a steady stream of requests for a form of the bacteria that causes botulism. The beauty of Botox, as agents have discovered in the few years since it landed on planet Hollywood, is its calming effect on facial winces and grimaces.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
England's Alton Towers is set to unleash the latest salvo in its arsenal of Secret Weapon roller coasters in March 2013 with the addition of a $29-million "world's first" ride aimed squarely at thrill-seekers. PHOTOS: Secret Weapon 7 (SW7) coaster at Alton Towers The United Kingdom theme park recently submitted plans to the local planning district that show a compact track layout with numerous inversions and several subterranean sections. Coaster fans have already converted the submitted plans into highly detailed concept art and animated videos . Alton Park has released few details about the new coaster, codenamed Secret Weapon 7 or SW7 for short, other than to say the two minute and 45 second ride will feature an initial drop of 98 feet and cover more than 3,800 feet of track while topping 50 mph. The custom track layout appears to feature at least eight inversions (with as many as 11, by some accounts)
SPORTS
February 1, 1996 | PETER YOON
Letters from NCAA Division I coaches arrive at Ruben Douglas' home two or three times a month. Phone calls from some of the same coaches are taken in Eli Essa's office on a weekly basis. None of this is unusual. Douglas is a standout basketball player for the Bell-Jeff High boys' basketball team. Essa is his coach. But what is a bit unusual is that such recruiting is taking place when Douglas is a sophomore. "I wasn't expecting to get all this attention this early," Douglas said.
SPORTS
September 18, 2009 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, ON HIGH SCHOOLS
On the eighth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack, Steven Manfro of Valencia did his best to make a statement that life must go on. He's 16 now and living far away from New York, where he was in 2001. "I was in school," he recalled. "It was pretty traumatic, and the fact it almost killed my father made it worse." His father, Marc, was a New York police officer who became ill in the aftermath of the attack. The family moved months later to Castaic to start a new life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Michael Phillips
And now for a wildly improbable romantic comedy recommendation. Already a hit in its native England, "About Time" presents all sorts of small- and medium-sized problems threatening to upset writer-director Richard Curtis' film from within, beginning with the premise (Only men in this family can time travel? Are the women at least allowed to vote?) and including the clanking interpolation of near-death experiences designed to make us care. The charm of the script comes in three fabrics: genuine, artificial and what you might call a cotton/poly blend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
John F. Kennedy High School considers itself Newark, N.J.'s "Best Kept Secret" - the staff even answers the phone with that tag line, and deservedly so. But as Samantha Buck's moving documentary makes clear, the secret weapon at the public school for special-needs students is Janet Mino, an inspirational teacher with limitless patience and indefatigable enthusiasm. Mino has taught her classroom of a half-dozen autistic boys in the country's 10th-poorest city for four years. They are all about to age out of the system - or, as one mom in Buck's research referred to it, "fall off the cliff.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In "The Diplomat," premiering Tuesday on ESPN, directors Senain Kheshgi and Jennifer Arnold look at figure skater Katarina Witt in the context of her changing times. (It shows as part of the network's documentary series "Nine for IX," as in Title IX, about women in sports.) Witt's career began in what used to be called East Germany and ended in the reunified state; it's a story from back when the developed world was divided into capitalist and communist, and the twain met only with difficulty - and perhaps most often through athletics.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
Yasiel Puig has been a sensation. Matt Kemp, maybe baseball's best player two years ago, is back from injury. Adrian Gonzalez galvanizes the Latino fan base and leads the team in homers an RBIs. Andre Ethier is called a team savior. Then there's Hanley Ramirez. A player who won a batting title, is a three-time all-star, is a former National League rookie of the year and is in the prime of his career. And he's being overlooked? Yeah, kind of. Compared with Puig captivating the sporting world and the adulation thrown at Kemp, the attention hasn't exactly been heaped on Ramirez.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Few places in the aerospace industry are as revered as Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Skunk Works. For decades, employees at the secretive site have designed and built the some of the most innovative military aircraft ever built. The U-2 spy plane. The SR-71 Blackbird. The F-117 Nighthawk. This week, the shadowy weapons development facility in Palmdale silently celebrated its 70th anniversary. It should come as no surprise that the milestone came with little fanfare, considering the Skunk Works mantra is "quick, quiet and quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
So, let's see if we've got this straight. When Ja'Nel is on the red team, the team racks up an unbelievable winning streak, taking home the trophy for every single challenge -- save one. And when she gets switched over the the blue team, lo and behold, they turn their losing streak around by nailing the relay challenge. Is Ja'Nel the one to beat? Perhaps, if she can stay out of the way of flying lobster. And perhaps, unless we find out this has all been crafty editing and one of the other competitors -- Mary, maybe?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In "The Diplomat," premiering Tuesday on ESPN, directors Senain Kheshgi and Jennifer Arnold look at figure skater Katarina Witt in the context of her changing times. (It shows as part of the network's documentary series "Nine for IX," as in Title IX, about women in sports.) Witt's career began in what used to be called East Germany and ended in the reunified state; it's a story from back when the developed world was divided into capitalist and communist, and the twain met only with difficulty - and perhaps most often through athletics.
NEWS
February 23, 1988 | Maura Dolan
What a birthday party! Loreen Gephardt, mother of candidate Gephardt, turned 80 over the weekend and met her son for what the campaign billed as a "birthday party" on the campaign trail. The "party" turned out to be a Gephardt speech about trade and farm policy in front of 135 Democrats in Watertown, S.D. Nobody sang "Happy Birthday." There were some birthday touches, however: balloons in the campaign's red, white and blue colors, and a sheet cake that was cut after the candidate left.
SPORTS
May 31, 2013 | By Mike Hiserman
With all that has been said about Kris Bryant's prodigious baseball talents — the tape-measure home runs, pitches he shouldn't have been able to hit but did — he is also a scholar-athlete, a highly intelligent young man. It must run in the family. Because Grandpa was certainly no fool. From the time Bryant was 8 or so, college baseball's most feared slugger recalls his grandfather awarding him $20 for every home run. The practice allowed Bryant to accumulate quite a bundle of Jacksons before the rewards stopped during his high school years.
SPORTS
February 22, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
In a practice gym at the Galen Center, Dewayne Dedmon runs and dunks a basketball as if there were nothing easier in the world. He doesn't seem concerned with 15-foot jump shots either. Dedmon is 7 feet tall, and it would seem he will eventually make a living by staying close to the basket. In the same gym on a Thursday afternoon, the 7-foot-2 Omar Oraby catches a pass with sure hands, takes one step and dunks the ball. The catch, the move, the dunk happen so quickly it would seem as though nothing could stop Oraby from scoring dozens of points or grabbing dozens of rebounds.
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